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Senior Media Coordinator

Leisure and Cultural Services Department

Terms of Appointment:Non-civil serviceAcademic Qualification Requirement:DegreeSalary:Monthly HKD$ 60,000Application Deadline:19-03-2021ApplyApply
Supplies Assistant

Government Logistics Department

Terms of Appointment:Civil serviceAcademic Qualification Requirement:Secondary 4Salary:Monthly HKD$ 13,735Application Deadline:18-03-2021ApplyApply
Station Officer (Operational)

Fire Services Department

Terms of Appointment:Civil serviceAcademic Qualification Requirement:Degree, Associate Degree or Higher Diploma, Diploma from a registered post-secondary college, HKDSEE results, HKALE resultsSalary:Monthly HKD$ 41,380Application Deadline:Year-round RecruitmentVideoVideoApplyApply
Assistant Building Services Inspector

Housing Department

Terms of Appointment:Civil serviceAcademic Qualification Requirement:Diploma or Higher CertificateSalary:Monthly HKD$ 28,780Application Deadline:19-03-2021ApplyApply
Aircraft Technician (Airframe / Engine)

Government Flying Service

Terms of Appointment:Civil serviceAcademic Qualification Requirement:Certificate, HKDSEE results, HKCEE resultsSalary:Monthly HKD$ 21,780Application Deadline:18-03-2021ApplyApply

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What you need to know when applying for AO

Roles and DutiesAOs take up different positions in bureaux and departments, as well as district, Mainland and overseas offices in the Government at regular intervals. Through regular rotation of jobs, AOs receive wide exposure and acquire expertise in different policy areas, as well as develop multi-skills and accumulate rich experience in public administration. Not only are they required to possess a good understanding of their respective policy areas, they should also be alert and sensitive in listening to the views of different stakeholders and members of the public so that they are able to approach policy work with the overall public interest in mind. In formulating policies that contribute to the long-term development and benefits of Hong Kong, AOs also work closely with members of professional grades both within and outside the Government (such as various regulatory authorities and statutory bodies). Annual Recruitment Timeline*The information below is FOR REFERENCE ONLY. The actual periods and details of events will be announced nearer the events. You are advised to refer to the announcements made by then.>>Beginning of Recruitment Cycle<<JUL/AUG: Application Period for the Common Recruitment Examination (CRE) and Basic Law Test (BLT) SEP/OCT: Application Period for the AO PostOCT: CRE and BLTDEC: Joint Recruitment Examination (JRE)following yearFEB/MAR: Preliminary InterviewMAR/APR: Final InterviewJUN/JUL: First Batch of Offers of Appointment (Subject to completion of recruitment formalities)JUL/AUG: First Batch of New Recruits Reporting Duty>>End of Recruitment Cycle<< Entry Requirements1. Permanent Residency (At the time of appointment, must be a permanent resident of HKSAR; AND resided in Hong Kong for not less than 7 years.)2. Qualification (A first or second class honours bachelor’s degree from a Hong Kong university, or equivalent; OR A postgraduate degree from a Hong Kong university, or equivalent, where the qualifications considered in totality are comparable to the requirement in (i).)3. Good Command of both Chinese and English (Meeting the language proficiency requirement of Level 2 in the two language papers (Use of Chinese and Use of English) in the Common Recruitment Examination (CRE), or EQUIVALENT.)4. Aptitude Test (A Pass in the Aptitude Test in the Common Recruitment Examination (CRE).) Remuneration Package1. Starting SalaryPitched at Point 27 of the Master Pay Scale, which is at present HK$55,995 per month2. Annual Vacation LeaveAnnual vacation leave of 18 days per year3. Fringe BenefitsFree medical and dental treatment. On reaching Point 34 of the Master Pay Scale, officers will become eligible for housing benefits (a non-accountable cash allowance)4. Retirement BenefitMandatory Provident Fund on appointment on probationary terms; Civil Service Provident Fund on appointment on permanent terms. For more details, please visit the AO Recruitment website.And we have invited two young Adminstrative Officers Vincent and Kiki to share their reasons of serving at the Administrative Officer Grade, working experience and interview tips. Don't miss the sharing if you are interested in the Administrative Officer Grade!  (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese)

Gov Job

11-12-2020

Smart sensing technology to monitor tree stability

Every year before the onset of wet season, tree management departments will complete Tree Risk Assessments (TRAs) and implement appropriate risk mitigation measures to protect tree health and public safety. In recent years, the Government has launched several pilot schemes to explore the use of technology in tree management to enhance its quality and efficiency. Here we invited a colleague of the Greening, Landscape and Tree Management Section (GLTMS) of the Development Bureau (DEVB) to talk about tree inspections before wet season. We also invited Dr WONG Man-sing, Charles, Associate Professor of the Department of Land Surveying and Geo-Informatics of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU), to introduce how to apply smart sensing technology to monitor tree stability.Risk assessments before wet seasonAccording to the “Guidelines on Tree Risk Assessment and Management Arrangement”, every year before the onset of wet season, tree management departments are required to complete TRAs in areas with high pedestrian and traffic flow professionally and systematically and implement appropriate risk mitigation measures based on the assessment results, such as crown pruning and installation of support systems. Dangerous trees with untreatable problems need to be removed as soon as possible to safeguard public safety. Mr TSANG Kwok-on, the GLTMS’s Tree Management Officer, said that tree inspection personnel mainly perform ground inspection to examine and assess various parts of a tree, including the crown, leaves, branches, trunk, roots and the surrounding environment of the tree, etc. Inspection personnel would also employ tools to aid their work, for example, using a plastic mallet to tap the trunk to assess its structural condition and using binoculars to observe the growing conditions of the higher branches and leaves. If necessary, inspection personnel would climb up the tree to inspect the hidden parts from different angles. If decay or other structural problems are found or suspected, they would use a resistograph or sonic tomograph (pictured) to examine the internal structural condition of the tree. Applying smart sensing technology in tree managementUnder adverse weather such as rainstorm or typhoon, it is inevitable that trees would suffer different degrees of damage. A research team formed by DEVB, the PolyU and other tertiary institutions is conducting a 3-year Jockey Club Smart City Tree Management Project to monitor tree stability on a large scale through smart sensing technology and Geographic Information System. The research team will assess the risk of tree failure by monitoring trees’ swaying or tilting condition, thereby strengthening tree risk management.Dr WONG Man-sing, Charles, Associate Professor of the Department of Land Surveying and Geo-Informatics of the PolyU, said that the sensors are installed at the lower trunks of the trees to assess the trees’ tilting angles and directions, and the data would then be sent to the university’s data centre via network transmission for big data analytics. If it is shown that the tilting angle of the lower trunk of the tree exceeds the threshold, the system would immediately send an alert to the designated parties to undertake timely and appropriate risk mitigation measures. Large-scale monitoring of tree stabilityDr WONG said that the Smart Sensing Technology pilot scheme started in February in 2019. An initial trial was conducted in Tai Tong, Yuen Long, to set reference for the design of sensors and monitoring system. Upon fine tuning the system, the research team has installed the second batch of sensors in Wan Chai and Kowloon East districts to test the network transmission performance in urban areas. The whole pilot scheme involves the installation of a total of 8 000 sensors on selected urban trees and all stonewall trees across Hong Kong Island and Kowloon, which will be completed in phases between the end of 2019 and early 2020. The trees are mainly located in areas with high pedestrian and traffic flow such as pavements, slopes and parks.Trees are very much intertwined with our daily lives. In an urbanised city like Hong Kong, trees let us have a green living environment. While we make our best endeavours to manage tree risks, we also need private property owners and property management companies to conduct proper tree care within their properties. (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese) (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

Gov Job

18-12-2020

Landslide Emergency Services and Slope Maintenance Teams (Civil Engineering and Development Department)

"My grandpa and uncle are engineers. As a kid, they nurtured my interest in this area. Back then, whenever I saw tunnels, I found them so remarkable. I was always wondering why a tunnel would not collapse." Geotechnical Engineer, Civil Engineering and Development Department, Fung Ka-wing told us."Hong Kong has lots of mountains and little flat land, and the population density is high. Every year, the Geotechnical Engineering Office receives about 300 reports on landslides." "Once, I arrived at a landslide site and I received a message at the same time that Super Typhoon Mangkhut would approach Hong Kong soon. I urged the villagers to move out temporarily as it was very dangerous. At first, the villagers did not listen to my recommendation. But I explained the situation to them patiently. Finally, they accepted it."He said, "Our top priority is to ensure the safety of the general public. We believe that they can feel it too." Hong Kong has a land area of about 1,100 km2. Around 60% of the land area consists of relatively steep natural terrain. During the rainy season, landslides occur frequently, with an average of 300 reported landslides in Hong Kong each year.The Geotechnical Engineering Office (GEO) of the Civil Engineering and Development Department (CEDD) has a slope safety management system in place to protect the general public from landslide hazards.When the Hong Kong Observatory issues a Landslide Warning or typhoon signal no. 8 or above, the Emergency Control Centre of the Geotechnical Engineering Office will be in operation.Over ten geotechnical engineers and technical officers will be on duty to provide geotechnical advice to government departments on handling landslide emergencies.Upon receiving landslide reports, geotechnical engineers will carry out site inspections and give advice to government departments to restore services and facilities disrupted by landslides.Geotechnical Engineer, Civil Engineering and Development Department, Ting Sui-man said, "Our top priority is to ensure the safety of the general public. If rescue work is required, we will collaborate with the Fire Services Department and provide advice to the Police on the areas to be cordoned off. We will also contact responsible works departments to carry out emergency slope works. It includes promptly covering the slopes with tarpaulin to prevent rainwater infiltration which may cause further landslides."When more serious landslides occur, the work of the geotechnical engineers will be even more hectic. In the evening of 29 August 2018, a massive landslide hit a road section of Fan Kam Road near Ta Shek Wu Tsuen. Both lanes of Fan Kam Road were closed due to inundation of debris and muddy water on the road.Geotechnical Engineer, Civil Engineering and Development Department, Fung Ka-wing said, "When I arrived at the site, the landslide debris from the hillside covered the entire road. The debris was up to knee level. I urged the villagers to move out temporarily."Resident, Angelina Yeung said, "I heard a “boom” and all of a sudden the debris rushed to near my house, and a van was bumped in. The Geotechnical Engineering Office used concrete blocks to build a barrier around the slope, covered the slope surface with tarpaulin and shotcrete the landslide scar."Angelina Yeung continued, "A lot of elderly people live here. They (CEDD) did a lot of works, some beyond their scope. They have been really helpful. And we are so grateful to them."The day after the landslide, staff of the Geotechnical Engineering Office and Survey Division visited the site again.They used drones and handheld laser scanners to quickly conduct landslide risk assessment. Detailed geographical data of the nearby natural terrain were collected, providing useful information for the design of emergency works.Geotechnical Engineer, Civil Engineering and Development Department, Choi Wai-kwok, Michael explained, "The data collected on site, i.e. the three-dimensional image, enabled our engineers to carry out landslide hazard study and to assess whether there is any immediate or long term landslide risk. Based on the estimated size and volume of potential further landslides, suitable engineering works would be carried out accordingly, such as the installation of soil nails and flexible barrier to protect Fan Kam Road at slope toe."Fan Kam Road is the main road connecting Fanling and Kam Tin. The landslide took place just before the school re-opening in September. To restore the road service as quickly as possible and to minimise disruption to the residents, the Geotechnical Engineering Office worked closely with the Highways Department. Immediate action was taken to mobilise the contractors to carry out emergency repair work at the critical location.Geotechnical Engineer, Civil Engineering and Development Department, Lo Ho-pong said, "Most of the landslide debris was accumulated at the mid-level of the hillside, posing subsequent landslide danger. The biggest challenge was how to deal with these debris. Our target was to re-open at least one lane of the road to cope with the traffic on the first day of school."He continued, "We discussed with our contractors and engineers on how to optimise the design to ensure that the construction works could be completed by 10 p.m. that night."Immediately after completion of Stage 1 emergency works, Stage 2 works was also successfully completed within the next two weeks. All these emergency works were essential for  preventing more severe landslides from happening when Super Typhoon Mangkhut hit Hong Kong.Actually, there are some other works of the Geotechnical Engineering Office that are closely related to the daily life of the general public.Geotechnical Engineer, Civil Engineering and Development Department, Chu Kei-hong said, "CEDD operates 90 raingauges in Hong Kong, which account for the majority amongst all government departments. The rainfall data collected by these raingauges enable us to have a clear picture of the rainfall condition of Hong Kong. This facilitates our joint decision with the Hong Kong Observatory on the issue or cancellation of a Landslide Warning."Chief Geotechnical Engineer, Civil Engineering and Development Department, Yeung Fei, Jenny said, "We are now facing the challenge of extreme rainfall events caused by global warming. We must stay alert, and cannot slack off. We will keep striving our best to serve the public, and to protect their lives and properties from the threats of landslides." (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

Gov Job

21-10-2020

Job Overview

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Common Recruitment Examination and Basic Law Test

Please read thoroughly the "Notes for Applicants" and "Frequently Asked Questions"