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Ten landscapes and Ten characters – the fantastic MacLehose Trail

Ten landscapes and Ten characters – the fantastic MacLehose Trail This year is the 40th anniversary of the MacLehose Trail. Rated by the National Geographic as one of the top 20 dream trails in the world, the MacLehose Trail definitely worth a visit, at least a section, by every Hong Konger.This 100-kilometre trail is divided into ten sections, traversing the New Territories from East to West through eight country parks namely Sai Kung East, Sai Kung West, Ma On Shan, Lion Rock, Kam Shan, Shing Mun, Tai Mo Shan and Tai Lam. If you have ever visited any of one section, you would probably find it amazing with There are coastline, mountains, valleys and reservoirs. The trail offers hikers beautiful countryside scenery in New Territories as well as overlooking view of the cityscape of the Kowloon Peninsula. This famous trail has been named as one of the world's 20 dream trails by the National Geographic.Each of the ten sections is quite unique indeed. If you have geared up but are yet to decide which section to start for your journey, watch the ten videos below produced by the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department now for more details of the landscapes and characters of the MacLehose Trail! "MacLehose Trail Section 1: Extraordinary Craftsmanship" Pak Tam Chung to Long KeStarting Point: Pak Tam ChungFinishing Point: Long KeLength: 10.6 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 2: Boundless Nature" Long Ke to Pak Tam AuStarting Point: Long KeFinishing Point: Pak Tam AuLength: 13.5 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 3: Unwind Yourself" Pak Tam Au to Kei Ling HaStarting Point: Pak Tam AuFinishing Point: Kei Ling HaLength: 10.2 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 4: Continous Challenges" Kei Ling Ha - Tate's CairnStarting Point: Kei Ling HaFinishing Point: Tate's CairnLength: 12.7 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 5: One Mountain One City" Tate's Cairn to Tai Po RoadStarting Point: Tate's CairnFinishing Point: Tai Po RoadLength: 10.6 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 6: Respect Nature" Tai Po Road to Shing MunStarting Point: Tai Po RoadFinishing Point: Shing Mun ReservoirLength: 4.6 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 7: Historical Traces" Shing Mun to Lead Mine PassStarting Point: Shing Mun ReservoirFinishing Point: Lead Mine PassLength: 6.2 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 8:Top of Hong Kong " Lead Mine Pass to Route TwiskStarting Point: Lead Mine PassFinishing Point: Route TwiskLength: 9.7 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 9: Enjoy the Serenity" Route Twisk to Tin Fu TsaiStarting Point: Route TwiskFinishing Point: Tin Fu TsaiLength: 6.3 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 10: Picturesque Landscapes" Tin Fu Tsai to Tuen MunStarting Point: Tin Fu TsaiFinishing Point: Tuen MunLength: 15.6 kilometresClick here for detail map (Information provided by Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department)

Park Warden

Apart from being a Park Warden, Choi King-fung is also an enthusiastic photographer particularly good at shooting natural scenery and the flora and fauna. Watch the video now to learn the tips for taking good photographs in a country park as well as more about the work of a Park Warden. Organisation chartOfficial recruitment page

Savoring Nature Up-close in Hong Kong

Savouring Nature Up-close Everything about nature is grand and wondrous. The ecology of the city is vibrant and inspiring. Embark on a journey of ecological exploration and experience for yourself the many different aspects of nature and its irresistible pulse of life. Hong Kong Biodiversity Festival 2019 Hong Kong Biodiversity Festival 2019 provides 150 educational activities for you to savour nature up-close with Mr. B. The Biodiversity in Hong Kong PlantThe major vegetation of Hong Kong belongs to the evergreen broad-leaved forest of the subtropics. Many species typical of the Southeast Asian tropical flora are also seen here at the limit of their northern distribution range. About 3,300 species and varieties of vascular plants have been recorded in Hong Kong, around 2,100 of which are native.MammalAmong the 57 existing terrestrial mammalian species in Hong Kong, 27 species are bats and 30 species are non-flying mammals, such as Barking Deer, East-Asian Porcupine and Eurasian Otter. There are also two species of marine mammalian species, including Chinese white dolphin and finless porpoise.HerptileHong Kong has over 108 species of amphibians and reptiles, including snakes, frogs, chelonians, lizards and etc. Among all herptiles, there are endemic species "Bogadek's Burrowing Lizard" and species first recorded from Hong Kong, such as "Romer's Tree Frog".FishHong Kong has over 200 species of freshwater fish that inhabit most Hong Kong watercourses, from swift flowing hill streams to trickling lowland rivers and estuaries. There are almost 1,000 of marine fish species recorded.BirdAround 550 species of birds have been recorded in Hong Kong. Most of them are passage migrants in Spring and Autumn, and wintering visitors. Hong Kong has a variety of habitats which provide a rich supply of food and shelter for these birds.InsectHong Kong is rich in insect fauna. There are about 200 species of butterflies and over 100 species of dragonflies being recorded in the territory. Most of them are brilliantly coloured and they are the most attractive flying creatures other than birds.   (Information provided by Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department)

Explore Kat O and Ap Chau

Ap Chau Geosite Visitors can see extraordinary red breccia at Ap Chau which is rare in Hong Kong, and appreciate a diverse range of striking wave erosion landforms at close range, such as a sea cliff, wave-cut platform, wave-cut notch, sea arch and sea stack, plus the famous ‘Duck’s Eye’. Ap Chau once had a thriving fishing community but only a few villagers continue to live on the island today. Its rustic bucolic charm is still inviting. How to get there Take the ferry operating between Ma Liu Shui to Kat O and Ap Chau on Saturdays, Sundays and Public holidays or join a local tour.To take the ferry, visitors can travel by MTR East Rail and get off at the University Station, Exit B, then walk for about 15 minutes to Ma Liu Shui Landing No.3 for the ferry service to Kat O and Ap Chau. The normal boat traveling time is about 2 hours. Visitors are advised to take the *ferry schedule into consideration in planning the trip.Service days: Saturdays, Sundays and Public HolidaysFare: $90 return ticket / $50 for single trip from Kat O to Ma Liu Shui onlyBooking & enquiries: 2555 9269 (Best Sonic Industrial Limited)(subject to operator’s announcement) *Ferry Schedule Route of ferry Departure Arrival Depart from Ma Liu Shui to Kat O 8:30 am   1st stop at Kat O   10:00 am  Depart from Kat O 10:15 am   2nd stop at Ap Chau   10:30 am  Depart from Ap Chau 12:00 nn   3rd stop at Kat O   12:15 pm Depart from Kat O 15:30 pm   Back to Ma Liu Shui   17:00 pm   (Information provided by Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department)

Veterinary

Elaine has returned to Hong Kong after graduating from her veterinary studies in Australia. Not interested in private practice, she has joined the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department and is determined to be a veterinary surgeon with a difference. She has been involved in enacting animal ordinances of great interest to Hong Kong, as well as quarantine work for the horses coming to Hong Kong for the Olympic equestrian events. Organisation chartOfficial recruitment page

Fisheries Technical Officer

Does a science student always end up with a job in the lab? Lawrence Leung, a Fisheries Technical Officer II, tells us that, with his science background, he was assigned on the first day of his job to take diving lessons and come into direct contact with the undersea world. From one who did not know much about fish, to one who has fallen in love with the ocean, he can now distinguish between different kinds of sea creatures. Through this job, he has come to embrace marine life and enter the diverse world of fisheries. As a result, he has also developed a greater fondness for the earth. Organisation chartOfficial recruitment page