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The most popular exhibition: "Eternal Life – Exploring Ancient Egypt" (Leisure and Cultural Services Department)

Museum Director (Science Museum), Leisure and Cultural Services Department, CHAN Shuk-man, Paulina said, "The Hong Kong Science Museum explores around the world every year for spectacular exhibitions to bring to the citizens of Hong Kong.""We encountered many difficulties, such as the regulation of temperature and humidity. Throughout the exhibition venue, we had to maintain a consistent temperature and humidity. We realised that there was not enough space at our Special Exhibition Hall. Therefore, we removed some exhibits from our Exhibition Hall temporarily so as to extend the exhibition space. The government has years of experience and established procedures in hosting exhibitions. But how do we give a facelift and bring a whole new experience to the public? We have to introduce new elements with our innovative spirit."CHAN Shuk-man, Paulina added, "We must have the vision and passion to bring high quality cultural events and exhibitions to the citizens of Hong Kong." The project, the exhibition on "Eternal Life – Exploring Ancient Egypt",  was primarily managed by Paulina and the Curatorial officers of the Science Museum.  The exhibition is so far the most popular exhibition of the Leisure and Cultural Services Department, attracting over 0.85 million visitors. Let’s see how they went the extra mile in using innovation to create the “world-class” exhibition.Exhibitions on Egyptian mummies are mostly presented from historical and archaeological perspectives. The Hong Kong Science Museum and The British Museum jointly organised the exhibition on “Eternal Life – Exploring Ancient Egypt” in 2017, using a scientific approach to unveil the myth about the eternal life of the ancient mummies.Paulina said, "Throughout the year, the Hong Kong Science Museum constantly looks out for spectacular exhibition items from around the world to present them to the enjoyment of Hong Kong people. A few years ago, we learnt that The British Museum had done some novel research on the mummies ofancient Egypt. On knowing that we were going to organise this exhibition, we realised that cultural relics was the key to understand the historical background of the exhibits. Then we brainstormed ideas and used innovative thinking to explore ways to make this exhibition a whole new experience for the public."During the exhibition, the exterior setting of the Science Museum was a replicate of an ancient Egyptian shrine.The then Designer I (Science), WONG Yin-yiu, Angela said, "Due to the original design of the Science Museum, we could not turn it into a pyramid. We conducted lots of research and found that shrine was of great importance in ancient Egypt. We hoped to create for the audience an ambience of making a pilgrimage when they visited the Science Museum."Paulina added, "We encountered quite a lot of difficulties. The British Museum is a world class museum. They have a very high standard for handling the cultural relics. They set stringent requirements in many aspects, such as the ambience temperature, humidity control, lighting arrangement at the venue, and even the air-tightness of the display cases."Technical Officer I (Science) Mechanical Engineering, CHAN Kim-fung said, "We all know how rarely in Hong Kong we have a relative humidity below 40%. We adopted a lot of measures. Our museum is not built for storing cultural relics, and our air conditioning system is a bit old without humidity control function. Therefore, we had to add a fresh air regulating function in our air conditioning system, to help control the humidity level of the exhibition halls." From venue setup, lighting design to the display of textual explanation, we hoped to bring to visitors an entirely new experience. For example, this multimedia programme, crafted by animations and 3D mapping technology, was the first of its kind among similar exhibitions worldwide.In addition to the original exhibits and textual explanations, to facilitate better understanding of the structure of the mummies from a scientific perspective, the Science Museum borrowed from a supplier a medical CT Scan. They used it to illustrate from a scientific perspective how archaeologists and other specialists applied non-intrusive method to determine the age and sex of the mummified bodies. Other themes, such as diet, health conditions, mummification process and religious customs of the ancient Egyptians were included.Curator (Science), CHUNG Chun-wah, Kelvin said, "In conjuring up this event, we wanted to introduce new elements. Then we came up with the idea of the “Escape Room”, which was something we never did before, and it was quite well received. The content of the “Escape Room”revolved around the information shown in the exhibition. We hoped that the visitors could make use of the information as clues to solve the puzzles, and then escape from the room."Paulina said, "The British Museum is a world class museum. We were contemplating how we could craft an exhibition suitable for Hong Kong people. We have put a lot of thoughts in designing the event, apart from the treatment of the cultural relics. I believe that colleagues in the museum need to have a vision and a passion for bringing high quality cultural activities and exhibitions to the people of Hong Kong." (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

Promoting the Development and Application of Renewable Energy (Drainage Services Department)

"As an experienced propellant of renewable energy projects in the Drainage Services Department, I constantly ponder ways to introduce breakthrough improvements in this area for the department and our community." Drainage Services Department Senior Project Manager, Li Chung-leung, Ricky said."I often encourage my colleagues to proactively voice out effective and innovative methods and ideas, enabling the department to continuously enhance the renewable energy focused quality service culture. Inculcating the mindset of “You Can Do It”, we strive to overcome the challenges encountered during the application of new technologies and the operation of renewable energy facilities."Ricky said, "I encourage them to try boldly and verify carefully, inspire and lead colleagues to pay extra effort and exert team spirit to resolve problems." Today, the harbour in Hong Kong is so beautiful that citizens can enjoy swimming and experience the excellent water quality. This is the result of Drainage Services Department’s (DSD) years of hard work.In addition to sewage treatment and flood prevention, DSD has been actively developing and promoting the application of renewable energy in recent years, contributing to the sustainable development in Hong Kong.Rapid population growth coupled with the dramatic increase in economic activities have inevitably generated a large amount of sewage. DSD collects up to 2.8 million m3 of sewage every day, enough to fill up 1,120 standard size swimming pools. The collected sewage is then conveyed to sewage treatment works for treatment. The conveyance and treatment processes consume substantial amount of energy.The four major secondary sewage treatment works in DSD have been employing the latest technology to utilise the biogas produced during the sludge treatment process to generate electricity and heat for use within the sewage treatment works. To maximise the use of renewable energy, DSD sent staff on study visits to the United States, Germany, and other regions to learn from their experience and to explore effective ways of developing renewable energy in Hong Kong.Ricky said, "Apart from getting our job done, we are constantly exploring ways to bring greater benefits to the environment. Taking the Tai Po Sewage Treatment Works as an example, we need to pay over a million dollars for electricity every month. Could it be self-sustainable in energy?" Riding on the production of biogas during the sludge treatment process, DSD, in the spirit of “Daring to Try, Practising with Care”, actively explores ways to increase the production of biogas. Finally, in 2016, DSD and the Environmental Protection Department (EPD) jointly developed the “Food Waste and Sewage Sludge Anaerobic Co-digestion” Trial Scheme. As the Scheme was new to Hong Kong, the departments encountered many challenges during implementation. Electrical & Mechanical Engineer, Drainage Services Department, Cheung Kin-kuen said, "Westerners’ diets are mostly meat-based, therefore, protein is the main component of their food waste, whereas in Hong Kong, the composition of food waste is mainly carbohydrates. To ensure the viability of this technology in Hong Kong, we commissioned a local university to conduct DNA test for micro-organisms to confirm that the technology is feasible to be applied in Hong Kong. It is estimated that EPD will provide the Tai Po Sewage Treatment Works of DSD with a maximum of 50 tonnes food waste per day. The pre-treated food waste will undergo anaerobic co-digestion with the sewage sludge in the sewage treatment works. The Scheme utilises existing facilities of DSD, to harness the synergy effect in generating 30% more biogas and at the same time reducing the amount of digestate by 30%. The Scheme not only helps alleviate the burden on landfills, but also supplies a million kilowatt-hours of electricity to the sewage treatment works annually, which helps save around a million dollars in electricity cost annually. In addition, DSD capitalises on its own advantages by installing photovoltaic panels at different sewage treatment works and pumping stations. Siu Ho Wan Sewage Treatment Works is equipped with over 4,200 photovoltaic panels with an installed generation capacity of 1.1 megawatt. When it came into operation in late 2016, it was the largest of its kind in Hong Kong. DSD also set up a Renewable Energy Information Centre there. Guided tours are provided with the aim of enhancing public awareness of the government’s effort in the development and application of renewable energy. To promote wider use of solar energy, DSD is exploring the feasibility of installing hotovoltaic panels on the covers of the sedimentation tanks at the Stonecutters Island Sewage Treatment Works, which is the largest of its type in Hong Kong. However, the curvy surface of the sedimentation tank covers makes it difficult to install traditional photovoltaic panels.The then Senior Electrical & Mechanical Engineer, Drainage Services Department, Wong Ying-ying, Regina added, "There are thin film photovoltaic panels available in the market. We installed them on the sedimentation tank Number 9 as a trial. Although we encountered different technical problems in the process, we are confident that by enhancing the design, more photovoltaic panels could be installed on the covers of sedimentation tanks." The then Deputy Director of Drainage Services, Drainage Services Department, Mak Ka-wai, JP said, "The mission of DSD is to provide the public with world-class sewage treatment and drainage services. With a “Do it from the Heart” attitude, we strive to develop renewable energy. On average, we produce around 27 million kilowatt-hours of electricity a year, which is equivalent to 9% of our overall electricity consumption. According to statistics, Hong Kong’s potential in developing renewable energy is about 3 to 4% of the total electricity consumed. Although we have already far exceeded this figure, DSD will keep the momentum going. We hope that by around 2030, we could successfully turn the Tai Po Sewage Treatment Works into a “zero emission” facility, achieving the goal of “waste-to-energy”. I believe that with the concerted efforts of our staff, we will be able to achieve it." (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

Enhancement of legal aid services through innovative use of information technology (Legal Aid Department)

The Legal Aid Department (LAD) commits to providing quality customer-oriented legal aid services. Aiming to improve service efficiency and provide prompt response to customers, LAD has developed new online services with the latest information technology to keep legal aid services abreast of the times. Service 1: EFFECTIVE USE OF QR CODES The pamphlet entitled How Your Financial Resources & Contribution are Calculated published by LAD contains calculation examples of different scenarios. However, as the rates of personal allowances and financial eligibility limits for legal aid are adjusted oftentimes, the calculation examples in the pamphlet require frequent updates, which are effort and time demanding but ephemeral. Resources were squandered consequently. To resolve the difficulty, LAD has added in the pamphlet relevant QR codes, through which members of the public can access the latest calculation examples on LAD’s website. When there is any adjustment to the calculation examples, it is necessary to update only the information on the website but not the pamphlet. Not only does this help protect the environment, but printing costs and staff resources could also be saved. Service 2:  MOBILE VERSION OF MEANS TEST CALCULATOR Since means assessment involves many factors concerning a legal aid applicant, LAD introduced in December 2008 an online Means Test Calculator, which provides a convenient way for members of the public to find out whether they are likely to be eligible for legal aid on means. The mobile version of the Means Test Calculator was subsequently introduced for easy access by mobile devices anytime anywhere. Service 3: ENHANCING SERVICES BY INSTANT TRANSLATION SYSTEM To overcome the language barrier faced by people of diverse race in making legal aid applications and the shortage of interpreters, LAD has developed an instant translation system, which can display and read out questions in languages commonly used by people of diverse race. The system also connects to an online translation programme which can translate the answers provided by legal aid applicants of diverse race in their own languages into English. LAD staff may then identify and provide suitable information to them to facilitate their legal aid applications. (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

Training beyond innovation (Electrical and Mechanical Services Department)

To support the implementation of this policy by various divisions, the Training Unit of the Electrical and Mechanical Services Department (EMSD) has taken the lead to apply I&T in its core training and enhanced the Technician Training Scheme to cultivate young professional teams with international vision, thereby injecting new blood into the E&M trade so as to tie in with the Government’s policy objective of building a smart city and developing I&T. IMPROVING TRAINING EFFECTIVENESS WITH I&T EMSD has converted a workshop in its headquarters building into a new digitalised Interactive Learning Centre in four months. Holographic images and three-dimensional projection technology are used to present to trainees the E&M equipment in buildings in great detail, which facilitates their clear understanding of the equipment’s structure and improves training efficiency. Moreover, the Department has tailor-designed various virtual reality training facilities, which not only enhance the flexibility, safety and coverage of training activities, but also significantly reduce the consumption of physical materials to achieve environmental benefits. JOINT TALENT TRAINING WITH THE TRADE To address the problem of an ageing workforce and manpower shortage in the E&M trade, EMSD enhanced its Technician Training Scheme, under which 100 places are added every year to nurture more young trainees so as to meet the needs arising from the digitalisation development. The Department has also collaborated with the trade and arranged for trainees to undergo internship in private organisations. Their performance has won recognition from the trade. Not only does this arrangement enrich the work experience of trainees, but it also helps solve the problem of manpower shortage in those organisations, a win-win for all. BROADENING INTERNATIONAL HORIZONS THROUGH TRAINING In order to enhance the skills of trainees and promote learning and exchange between young people in Hong Kong and Guangzhou, EMSD has signed the Memorandum of Co-operation on E&M Talent Development with the Guangzhou Municipal Human Resources and Social Security Bureau to train E&M talents for both cities and upgrade their skills as a whole. To broaden the international horizons of trainees, the Department encouraged them to participate in the biennial WorldSkills Competition. Two EMSD trainees who took part in the “Electrical Installations” and “Refrigeration and Air-conditioning” trades won in the WorldSkills Hong Kong and went on to represent Hong Kong in the WorldSkills Competition held in Kazan, Russia in August 2019. Coached by expert trainers, both trainees won Medallions for Excellence in the Competition, bringing glory to Hong Kong while proving that the technical skills of Hong Kong’s E&M personnel have attained international standards. (The video is conducted in Cantonese) (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

The pilot scheme of Tuen Mun Park inclusive play space (Architectural Services Department, Leisure and Cultural Services Department)

The Architectural Services Department (ArchSD) and the Leisure and Cultural Services Department (LCSD) have introduced the first inclusive playground in Hong Kong at Tuen Mun Park with two natural elements of “water” and “sand” in the design. This playground aims at providing a well-designed environment which allows children of different ages and abilities to equally enjoy a variety of physical, sensory and social play experiences. Children can take up challenges commensurate with their ability and interact with others while enjoying themselves in this playful environment. COMMUNITY DESIGN AND USER-ORIENTED APPROACH To respond to the demand for inclusive play spaces, ArchSD and LCSD swiftly implemented the winning schemes of the Inclusive Play Space Design Ideas Competition. Only a month after the competition, ArchSD had already completed the master layout plan and worked closely with LCSD on this project through exchange of ideas and inter-departmental design workshops. ArchSD and LCSD believe that the playground should be user-oriented. Stakeholders of various sectors were invited to join a series of focus group workshops and potential users’ views were collected. School children from Tuen Mun were invited to contribute ideas on the design of the sensory walls and the floor pattern of the water play area. The amazingly creative ideas of the children were gathered and seamlessly incorporated in the final design. The Tuen Mun District Council was also consulted and a swing area with feature swings were introduced to address the requests of the local community. COLLABORATE CLOSELY TO CATER TO DIFFERENT NEEDS To strike a balance between safety, enjoyment and inclusiveness, ArchSD and LCSD adopted an innovative approach to the design and management of the playground. Through collaborative team meetings and training workshops throughout the design and construction stages, the two departments discussed the management and maintenance arrangement of the playground, and all front-line staff were familiar with the inclusive design concept as well as the maintenance standard of the play equipment. ArchSD also customised suitable tools and accessories to facilitate the safe and effective work of LCSD’s team. Besides, ArchSD and LCSD had invited school children and professional bodies to join the experiencing workshops and trial play sessions, which not only promoted the project but also served as trial runs. Both departments could also observe the usage, survey users’ opinions, and conduct evaluation for the continuous improvement of the playground facilities and management. SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENT AND SUCCESSFUL INNOVATION The playground has been very popular and well received by the public, with extensive media coverage and shares on social media platforms. The concept of inclusive play has been successfully promoted in Hong Kong through this pilot project. It has won Gold Award 2018 presented by the Hong Kong Institute of Landscape Architects, the Special Architectural Award – Inclusive Design presented by the Hong Kong Institute of Architects, and the Annual Design Award presented by ArchSD, and has gained recognition from various government departments as well as committees on children and barrier-free affairs. Frequent site visits to the Park were held to share the experience gained. (The video is provided by Development Bureau) (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

New gear to save lives (Civil Aid Service)

Super typhoon Mangkhut left a path of destruction in Hong Kong last year when it knocked down more than 60,000 trees and caused extensive damage to the city. This year, the Government is readying for the wet season with new equipment and exercises to optimise its emergency response. One such drill, which put the Civil Aid Service’s preparedness for emergency operations to the test, saw service personnel efficiently cut apart a collapsed tree with new high-powered chainsaws in a Tsuen Wan campsite. Civil Aid Service (Department) Operations & Training Assistant Ng Shing-chiu said the new chainsaws are suitable for most scenarios involving typhoons. “The new chainsaw models have much more power and are simpler to use. “Another piece of equipment that has been introduced is the extended pole saw, which can stretch as high as 21 ft to reach broken branches on treetops.” To guarantee the chainsaw operator’s safety, the service also started using two types of protective chaps made of materials that can stop a chainsaw’s rotation, Mr Ng added. Better response Besides tree clearance, the service needs to deal with flooding, casualty evacuation, evacuation of residents and management of temporary shelters. It has introduced different types of specialised equipment to handle such scenarios, such as new and more comfortable life jackets for rescuers and victims. Previously the service only had one size of throwline, but now there are various sizes and lengths for different flood rescue scenarios. The rescuer can throw these throwlines from the shore or use them while they are in the water. Civil Aid Service (Department) Acting Principal Operations & Training Officer Chui Ka-yi said: “The service has seen all-around improvement in terms of equipment, training and relief effort strategies. “We also gained valuable experience from our deployment when super typhoons Mangkhut and Hato smashed into Hong Kong.” The service will hold talks and workshops in Kwun Tong and Sha Tin to introduce measures that residents should take when facing emergencies.” (For more details, please visit News.gov.hk website)

Butterflies add colour to HK (Field Officer II)

Tam Kin-chung joined the Agriculture, Fisheries & Conservation Department in 2012 and is an ecological surveyor in its Butterfly Working Group. The Field Officer is an expert on the winged insects and is well-versed in their behaviour. “The male butterflies usually put in a lot of effort to attract females. They try to find a plant with some special chemicals to convert them into pheromones to attract female butterflies.  “And some other butterflies, the male butterfly, will go to a hilltop. Such behaviour, we call that hill-topping. They go there to wait for a female butterfly to fly across so that they can have the courtship behaviour with them.” Survival skills The intricately detailed Tawny Mime is adept at imitating the appearance of the poisonous Chestnut Tiger to ward off predators, Mr Tam said. “They have a black forewing and a brown hindwing with some pale blue colour, colour stripes on their wings. “It is quite a beautiful butterfly but if you want to find one, it is quite difficult because the adults of Tawny Mime only appear in March and April every year. If you miss it, you will need to wait for another year to see this rare butterfly.” Mr Tam traverses the city to collect information on butterflies and finds it meaningful to help broaden people’s knowledge about the beautiful insects and to share the importance of environmental conservation. “Butterfly survey and investigation is very important to the public because butterflies are a part of our ecosystem. “When there are more butterflies, it means that there are more flowers and the vegetation should be quite good in the surrounding environment. They can support the butterflies, so that they come by. “It is very important for us to protect our environment so that more butterflies and animals can live there.” (For more details, please visit News.gov.hk Website)

T▪PARK – Transformation: Waste-to-Energy (Environmental Protection Department)

To support the concept of “waste-to-energy” and to promote a sustainable waste management strategy, T▪PARK, the first sludge incineration facility in Hong Kong was built in Tsang Tsui, Tuen Mun by the Environmental Protection Department (EPD). The facility is capable of processing up to 2,000 tonnes of sludge per day. In the past, sludge was disposed of at landfills, and this new approach has greatly alleviated the burden of depleting limited landfill capacity in Hong Kong. T▪PARK is also the largest and most advanced facility of its kind, combining sludge incineration, power generation, seawater desalination and wastewater treatment.AN INSPIRING AND MODERN DESIGNAt the beginning of the planning stage, EPD gathered the views of the public and later set up the District Liaison Group to strengthen communication with the key stakeholders. Many valuable suggestions, such as the expansion of the education centre and the addition of spa facilities, were incorporated into the design of T▪PARK. From the naming of the facility, the venue design, to the exhibits and the promotional activities, T▪PARK adopted an inspiring and modern design which combines environmental education with lifestyle trends to make it more attractive to the public.The design of the environmental education centre is highly innovative. The most eye-catching parts are the three indoor spa pools with different temperatures, which are maintained by the energy recovered from the sludge incineration process. The pools give the public a taste of the benefits of the “waste-to-energy” concept. The exhibition hall features a 180-degree projector to simulate the sludge treatment process in an interesting and interactive way via the use of sound, films and pictures, and lets the visitors experience what it would be like inside the incinerator. There is also an indoor walkway along the key processing areas where visitors can see the plant operation. T▪PARK features many environmental and conservational elements, including a bird sanctuary and a vegetarian eco-cafe which follows Food Wise, a food waste reduction campaign.WASTE-TO-RESOURCES, AND A FURTHER UNDERSTANDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTIONLocated next to a landfill outside the city centre of Hong Kong, T▪PARK is kept attractive to visitors by incorporating various creative elements in its exhibitions. One of the best examples is the furniture used in the cafe which is crafted from fender wood of the ex-Wanchai Ferry Pier area, showcasing the “waste-to-resources” concept.     Turning Ambition into Reality: Waste-to-energyWAN Gar-ling - Environmental Protection Officer, Environmental Protection Department. (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

"Letter to Hong Kong" Feature Video by Department Representatives

    (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

Drops · Livability (Drainage Services Department)

Happy Valley and its neighbourhood are low-lying areas flanked by hills. In the past, heavy rains triggered frequent flooding, which had a significant impact on the public. To protect people from the risk of floods, the Drainage Services Department (DSD) developed an innovative scheme to enhance flood protection in the district. The project team installed a stormwater storage tank underneath the Happy Valley Recreation Ground. During heavy rains, the tank temporarily stores excessive stormwater. Conventional drainage improvement schemes in urban areas are normally upgraded in-situ and in a large scale. In comparison, building a storage tank and storing flood water below ground greatly reduces disruptions to traffic flows and the general public. Movable weir The stormwater storage tank features a movable weir, which is a mechanism deployed by DSD for the first time. The weir’s opening, closing and overall positioning are automatically adjusted according to the real-time information on tidal levels as well as the water levels in the drainage culvert upstream and downstream. This mechanism allows stormwater overflow into the storage tank at the optimal time. Harvesting system collects groundwater and rainwater The tank’s design also incorporates a sizeable water harvesting system that collects groundwater and rainwater. After undergoing some simple treatment, the water can be used for irrigating the Happy Valley Recreation Ground and for toilet flushing, thereby conserving water resources. These features ensure that the project is sustainable and in line with the concept of “Sponge City”. Fan Room and Lawn A stormwater storage scheme requires the construction of support facilities above ground such as a fan room and a pump house. The project team customised the design to make optimal use of the site in the interest of the public. With an environment-friendly design, the ground floor of the fan room is opened up as a public amenity. The pump house is covered by a lawn, providing a comfortable outside area for fun and game watching. Going the extra mile, drop by drop, the project team consolidates stakeholders’ support and the fruit of joint efforts, bringing the project smoothly towards the goal of “Smart Drainage•Green Living”: flood protection and a more livable environment in tandem.     Partnering for innovationCHENG Nga-see - Senior Engineer, Drainage Services Department (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

The 100 civil servants commended for their outstanding work performance in 2019 are...

The civil servants commended for their outstanding work performance this year came from 39 bureaux/departments and from various professional and technical grades, disciplined services and general grades as well as Model Scale 1 grades. Here let me introduce you five of the awardees.Senior Dental Officer of the Department of Health Dr So Hon-chingWith over 25 years of service with the Government, Dr So has been dedicating great efforts to promoting oral care services for the elderly. He participated in the formulation of the Outreach Dental Care Programme for the Elderly, which provides free outreach dental services for the elderly residing in residential care homes or receiving services in day care centres. The programme is benefiting about 50 000 elderly persons each year.Assistant Officer I of the Correctional Services Department (CSD) Mr Fida HussainMr Hussain said the CSD's rehabilitation work is very meaningful. In addition to day-to-day duties, Mr Hussain, who can speak several languages, assists the department by acting as an interpreter to explain custodial procedures to non-ethnic Chinese persons in custody and counselling them whenever necessary.Chief Customs Officer of the Customs and Excise Department Ms Lau Wai-manDuring her career in law enforcement and customs clearance spanning 30-odd years, Ms Lau has detected many drug trafficking and smuggling cases. She currently works at Lok Ma Chau Control Point and is responsible for monitoring and ensuring the smooth operation of cargo and vehicle clearance. Her rich front-line experience made her understand that while enforcing the law in a professional manner, Customs officers should treat the public with empathy and spend more time on communication and explanation so as to avoid unnecessary misunderstanding and conflicts.Senior Field Assistant of the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department Mr Shek Shui-waWith over 34 years of service with the Government, Mr Shek has been tasked with duties related to the conservation of native plants since joining the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department. Mr Shek has earlier collected from the field a seedling of the rare and precious Westland's birthwort for conservation outside its habitat. With his efforts and persistence, seeds eventually germinated and propagated successfully. He will return the grown plants to nature to assist in the propagation of this rare plant in Hong Kong.Senior Waterworks Inspector Mr Wong Yiu-waiMr Wong has served in different positions in the Water Supplies Department during his 36 years of service and is currently attached to the Water Loss Management Section. With identifying leaking underground water mains in Hong Kong and Islands Region as his main duty, he has to study a lot of data collected from the water mains network every day, and at times carries out leak detection on-site late at night before determining follow-up actions so as to safeguard precious water resources.(The SCS's Commendation Award Scheme was introduced in 2004 to commend colleagues who have achieved outstanding work performance continuously for at least five years. The Scheme has a meticulous selection process which requires nominations from Permanent Secretaries, departmental heads or heads of grades, adjudication by a selection committee and final decision on the awardees' list by the SCS.)