Start main content

Fun in the Nature

Equipment list before planning a hike

Equipment list before planning a hike

If you are planning a hike, it is important to have the proper hiking gear. Take equipment according to your personal need and the nature of the activity. The checklist below is provided for reference. 1. Backpack - Place light items at the bottom, heavier items in the middle, and the heaviest ones on the top. Put less frequently used items first and frequently used ones on the sides. Be sure weight is equally balanced on each side.- It should not exceed one third of your body weight. The maximum weight is 40lb.   2. Hiking shoes - ide toe box hiking shoes with deep and thick lugs on outsole are preferable. 3. Socks 4. Shirt - Wear sun protective/moisture-wicking/breathable long-sleeved shirt with collar to avoid sunburn on your arms and the back of your neck. 5. Trousers - Sun protective/moisture-wicking/breathable loose-fitting trousers are preferable. 6. Towel/cooling towel/arm sleeves 7. Outer garments & windproof jacket/rain jacket 8. Hat, sunglasses, umbrella, gloves 9. Spare clothing 10. Hiking stick 11. Compass & map (countryside series published by the Lands Department)  12. Illumination device 13. Whistle 14. Food & emergency food: Bring portable and conveniently packaged food with high calories, e.g. glucose, raisins, and other high energy food. 15. Water bottle & water (drinking water refilling stations in Country Parks) 16. Personal drugs & first aid supplies 17. Sunscreen and mosquito repellent  18. Mobile phone & battery/charger & charging cable (Mobile Network Services in Country Parks) 18. Watch 20. Hong Kong Hiking Trail Weather Service For more details, please refer to the AFCD Enjoy Hiking website
Ten spectacular scenic spots on the Wilson Trail

Ten spectacular scenic spots on the Wilson Trail

The Wilson Trail is built for experienced hikers. The trail, which is about 78 km long, crosses the territory from Stanley in the south to Nam Chung in the north.  It is divided into 10 sections, each has its unique natural beauty awaiting to be discovered. How many of the 10 scenic spots below could you recognise?   [ Scenic Spot 1: Ma Kong Shan View Compass ]Photo Spot: 376 metres in elevation on Ma Kong Shan (The Twins)Section passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 1) Stanley Gap Road to Wong Nai Chung Reservoir (Length: 4.8km | Duration: 3 hrs | Region: HK Island | Difficulty: ★★★ | Shading Level: Low) [ Scenic Spot 2: Overlooking Kowloon East ]Photo Spot: 354 metres in elevation on Siu Ma ShanSection passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 2)Wong Nai Chung Reservoir to Lam Tin (Length: 6.6km | Duration: 2.5 hrs | Region: HK Island | Difficulty: ★★★ | Shading Level: Medium) [ Scenic Spot 3: Overlooking Tung Lung Chau ] Photo Spot: 180 metres in elevation on Devil's PeakSection passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 3) Lam Tin to Tseng Lan Shue (Length: 9.3km | Duration: 4hrs | Region: Sai Kung | Difficulty: ★★★ | Shading Level: Low) [ Scenic Spot 4: Overlooking Kowloon Peninsula ]Photo Spot: Jat's Incline Parking ViewpointSection passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 4) Tseng Lan Shue to Sha Tin Pass (Length: 8km | Duration: 3hrs | Region: Central New Territories | Difficulty: ★★★ | Shading Level: Low) [ Scenic Spot 5: Entrance of Catchwater ]Photo Spot: Tai Po Road near the Kowloon ReservoirSection passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 5) Sha Tin Pass to Tai Po Road (Length: 7.4km | Duration: 2.5hrs | Region: Central New Territories | Difficulty: ★★ | Shading Level: Medium) [ Scenic Spot 6: Artificial Waterfall under Shing Mun Reservoir Main Dam ]Photo Spot: Near the Shing Mun Reservoir Main Dam (*The waterfall as shown in the photo could only be seen after heavy rainfall in summer)Section passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 6) Tai Po Road to Shing Mun Reservoir (Length: 5.3km | Duration: 2hrs | Region: Central New Territories | Difficulty: ★★ | Shading Level: High) [ Scenic Spot 7: Paper-bark Trees Woodland ]Photo Spot: Near the Shing Mun ReservoirSection passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 7) Shing Mun Reservoir to Yuen Tun Ha (Length: 10.2km | Duration: 4hrs | Region: Central New Territories | Difficulty: ★★★ | Shading Level: Medium) [ Scenic Spot 8: Lam Tsuen River ]Photo Spot: Lam Tsuen River, near Parc VersaillesSection passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 8) Yuen Tun Ha to Cloudy Hill (Length: 9km | Duration: 4hrs | Region: North New Territories | Difficulty: ★★★★ | Shading Level: Low) [ Scenic Spot 9: Overlooking Plover Cove ]Photo Spot: 511 metres in elevation on Hsien Ku FungSection passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 9) Cloudy Hill to Pat Sin Leng (Length: 10.6km | Duration: 4.5hrs | Region: North New Territories | Difficulty: ★★★★ | Shading Level: Low) [ Scenic Spot 10: Deserted Village ]Photo Spot: Near Upper Wang Shan Keuk VillageThe section passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 10) Pat Sin Leng to Nam Chung (Length: 6.8km | Duration: 2.5hrs | Region: North New Territories | Difficulty: ★★★★ | Shading Level: High) *For more about the Wilson Trail, please visit the "Enjoy Hiking" website. (The images and the information are provided by Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department)
Ten landscapes and Ten characters – the fantastic MacLehose Trail

Ten landscapes and Ten characters – the fantastic MacLehose Trail

Ten landscapes and Ten characters – the fantastic MacLehose Trail This year is the 40th anniversary of the MacLehose Trail. Rated by the National Geographic as one of the top 20 dream trails in the world, the MacLehose Trail definitely worth a visit, at least a section, by every Hong Konger.This 100-kilometre trail is divided into ten sections, traversing the New Territories from East to West through eight country parks namely Sai Kung East, Sai Kung West, Ma On Shan, Lion Rock, Kam Shan, Shing Mun, Tai Mo Shan and Tai Lam. If you have ever visited any of one section, you would probably find it amazing with There are coastline, mountains, valleys and reservoirs. The trail offers hikers beautiful countryside scenery in New Territories as well as overlooking view of the cityscape of the Kowloon Peninsula. This famous trail has been named as one of the world's 20 dream trails by the National Geographic.Each of the ten sections is quite unique indeed. If you have geared up but are yet to decide which section to start for your journey, watch the ten videos below produced by the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department now for more details of the landscapes and characters of the MacLehose Trail! "MacLehose Trail Section 1: Extraordinary Craftsmanship" Pak Tam Chung to Long KeStarting Point: Pak Tam ChungFinishing Point: Long KeLength: 10.6 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 2: Boundless Nature" Long Ke to Pak Tam AuStarting Point: Long KeFinishing Point: Pak Tam AuLength: 13.5 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 3: Unwind Yourself" Pak Tam Au to Kei Ling HaStarting Point: Pak Tam AuFinishing Point: Kei Ling HaLength: 10.2 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 4: Continous Challenges" Kei Ling Ha - Tate's CairnStarting Point: Kei Ling HaFinishing Point: Tate's CairnLength: 12.7 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 5: One Mountain One City" Tate's Cairn to Tai Po RoadStarting Point: Tate's CairnFinishing Point: Tai Po RoadLength: 10.6 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 6: Respect Nature" Tai Po Road to Shing MunStarting Point: Tai Po RoadFinishing Point: Shing Mun ReservoirLength: 4.6 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 7: Historical Traces" Shing Mun to Lead Mine PassStarting Point: Shing Mun ReservoirFinishing Point: Lead Mine PassLength: 6.2 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 8:Top of Hong Kong " Lead Mine Pass to Route TwiskStarting Point: Lead Mine PassFinishing Point: Route TwiskLength: 9.7 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 9: Enjoy the Serenity" Route Twisk to Tin Fu TsaiStarting Point: Route TwiskFinishing Point: Tin Fu TsaiLength: 6.3 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 10: Picturesque Landscapes" Tin Fu Tsai to Tuen MunStarting Point: Tin Fu TsaiFinishing Point: Tuen MunLength: 15.6 kilometresClick here for detail map (Information provided by Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department)
FIVE must-go spots on Hong Kong Trail

FIVE must-go spots on Hong Kong Trail

The Hong Kong Trail (50 km) traverses all the five country parks on Hong Kong Island. It is divided into 8 sections, each with plenty of stunning views. Below are five scenic spots you should not miss!    Scenic Spot 1: Pinewood Battery Section passed by: Hong Kong Trail (Section 1)The Peak to Pok Fu Lam Reservoir RoadTransportation: Take public transport to Kotewall Road bus terminus. Then walk uphill along Hatton Road to Picnic Area Site No.1 in Lung Fu Shan Country Park. The Pinewood Battery is next to the picnic area. Pinewood Battery - Historical RelicsLocated in Lung Fu Shan Country Park, Pinewood Battery was an important point of coastal defence because it is situated at an area of elevated terrain looking out on the western mouth of Victoria Harbour.  Construction of the battery started in the late 19th century and was completed in 1905 as part of the British colonial government’s plan to strengthen the defence of the western part of Hong Kong Island. With the rise of airpower on the verge of the Second World War, Pinewood Battery became an anti-aircraft battery with facilities like barracks to defend against the Japanese Army, instead of the French or Russian forces.  It was later abandoned in 1941 when it was heavily shelled by Japanese artillery fire. Surprisingly, its command post, lookouts, magazines, and even the lavatory remain in good conditions, allowing visitors to learn about the wartime history along the 400-metre Pinewood Battery Heritage Trail...Read more    Scenic Spot 2: Lugard RoadSection passed by: Hong Kong Trail (Section 1)The Peak to Pok Fu Lam Reservoir RoadTransportation: Walk along Peak Road towards Peak Tower after arriving at the Peak. The start point is the entrance of Lugard Road. Lugard Road - Hong Kong’s most iconic view of Victoria HarbourThe bird’s eye view of Victoria Harbour from Victoria Peak is unquestionably Hong Kong’s most iconic view.  Apart from the pavilion scene often featured on postcards, an even more sweeping vista is offered at the start point of the Hong Kong Trail, Lugard Road.  Built between 1913 and 1914 with some narrow, cliff-side paths called plank roads, the hundred-year-old trail is named after the 14th Governor of Hong Kong, Sir Frederick Lugard. Not only is it a great spot to admire sunset and night views, but it is also where you can witness the extraordinary scene of our city enveloped in mist in spring. The Peak Trail is surrounded by lush forestry and moss-covered rocks, dotted with a variety of flora species throughout the year – between April and May pink flowers of the Lance-leaved Sterculia, come into bloom; from July to October white flowers of the Turn-in-the-wind, embellish the trail.  Together with antique stone benches and streetlights, it exudes an air of ancient elegance. Continue on to Harlech Road, which is to the southwest of Victoria Peak, and then stroll along the shaded tree-lined trail at Pok Fu Lam Reservoir.  It will instantly connect you from the bustling financial centre to a rural idyll on the western part of Hong Kong Island, which is yet another way to tell the stories of Hong Kong.Read more    Scenic Spot 3: Sunset View from High West Section passed by: Hong Kong Trail (Section 1)The Peak to Pok Fu Lam Reservoir RoadTransportation: Take public transport to the Peak and alight at the Peak terminus. Walk along Harlech Road for 30 minutes to reach High West picnic area. Then take the path next to the picnic site and walk uphill to High West. High West Viewing Point - Sunrise and SunsetTowering at an elevation of 494 metres as the fourth tallest mountain on Hong Kong Island, High West divides the prosperous Central and Western District from the tranquil Southern District.  Its summit, which can be reached by climbing a long flight of 600 steps, offers unobstructed views of the West Lamma Channel stretching to the horizon.  It also looks out on Lamma Island in the south and as far as the Lema Islands outside the territory.  As dusk approaches, the sun dips gently among the hills of Lantau Island, giving off a beautiful red sunset over the sky and the sea.  As you are busy taking photos of the scene in front of you, Victoria Harbour is also bathed in the glow of the setting sun, with skyscrapers on the waterfront sparkling before being lit at night...Read more    Scenic Spot 4: Stunning ReservoirSection passed by: Hong Kong Trail (Section 6) Mount Parker Road to Tai Tam RoadTransportation: Take public transport and alight at "Tai Tam Country Park" bus stop. Go to the opposite side where the entrance of Tai Tam Country Park is located. Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir Masonry Bridge - Hipster HitsThe architectural artistry during Hong Kong’s colonial era is best manifested in the Tai Tam Group of Reservoirs, which is one of the six prewar reservoirs in Hong Kong. Completed between 1888 and 1917, it consists of Tai Tam Upper Reservoir, Tai Tam Byewash Reservoir, Tai Tam Intermediate Reservoir, and Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir, featuring 22 century-old declared monuments.  In particular, the four masonry arch bridges that appear in the woods of Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir, alongside their reflections in the lake, are the most breathtaking.  These four bridges were built in the Victorian style and have been classified as Grade I historic buildings.  In fact, if you want to visit all the masonry bridges, Tai Tam Waterworks Heritage Trail is the place.  Located to the west of Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir, the trail lets you admire its own unique beauty.  Other highlights include the masonry aqueduct, the valve house and the dam, which are all worth a visit...Read more    Scenic Spot 5: Viewing the sea on Dragon's BackSection pass 5ed by: Hong Kong Trail (Section 8)To Tei Wan to Tai Long WanTransportation: Take public transport to "To Tei Wan" bus stop on Shek O Road to the entrance of Hong Kong Trail Section 8. Walk uphill along Hong Kong Trail Section 8. Shek O Peak - Viewing PointsAlthough Shek O Peak sits at Shek O Country Park at an altitude of only 284 metres, its footpath leads to D’Aguilar Peninsula, where turquoise waters in the surroundings that stretch to the horizon come into full view.  It belongs to Section 8 of the Hong Kong Trail, connecting with Wan Cham Shan along the ridgeline of the world-renowned Dragon’s Back . It got this name because of the resemblance of its meandering and undulating hills to the shape of the back ridge of a dragon.  The footpath also overlooks Big Wave Bay and Shek O, commands views of Tung Lung Island and Hong Kong’s southernmost island Po Toi Island in the distance, and offers vistas of the boundless South China Sea.  To enhance the public’s understanding of the nearby mountains and islands, there are information boards at the Dragon’s Back Viewing Point...Read more *Click for more information about the Hong Kong Trail, or visit the "Enjoy Hiking" website. (The images and the information are provided by Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department)
Equipment list before planning a hike

Equipment list before planning a hike

If you are planning a hike, it is important to have the proper hiking gear. Take equipment according to your personal need and the nature of the activity. The checklist below is provided for reference. 1. Backpack - Place light items at the bottom, heavier items in the middle, and the heaviest ones on the top. Put less frequently used items first and frequently used ones on the sides. Be sure weight is equally balanced on each side.- It should not exceed one third of your body weight. The maximum weight is 40lb.   2. Hiking shoes - ide toe box hiking shoes with deep and thick lugs on outsole are preferable. 3. Socks 4. Shirt - Wear sun protective/moisture-wicking/breathable long-sleeved shirt with collar to avoid sunburn on your arms and the back of your neck. 5. Trousers - Sun protective/moisture-wicking/breathable loose-fitting trousers are preferable. 6. Towel/cooling towel/arm sleeves 7. Outer garments & windproof jacket/rain jacket 8. Hat, sunglasses, umbrella, gloves 9. Spare clothing 10. Hiking stick 11. Compass & map (countryside series published by the Lands Department)  12. Illumination device 13. Whistle 14. Food & emergency food: Bring portable and conveniently packaged food with high calories, e.g. glucose, raisins, and other high energy food. 15. Water bottle & water (drinking water refilling stations in Country Parks) 16. Personal drugs & first aid supplies 17. Sunscreen and mosquito repellent  18. Mobile phone & battery/charger & charging cable (Mobile Network Services in Country Parks) 18. Watch 20. Hong Kong Hiking Trail Weather Service For more details, please refer to the AFCD Enjoy Hiking website
Ten spectacular scenic spots on the Wilson Trail

Ten spectacular scenic spots on the Wilson Trail

The Wilson Trail is built for experienced hikers. The trail, which is about 78 km long, crosses the territory from Stanley in the south to Nam Chung in the north.  It is divided into 10 sections, each has its unique natural beauty awaiting to be discovered. How many of the 10 scenic spots below could you recognise?   [ Scenic Spot 1: Ma Kong Shan View Compass ]Photo Spot: 376 metres in elevation on Ma Kong Shan (The Twins)Section passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 1) Stanley Gap Road to Wong Nai Chung Reservoir (Length: 4.8km | Duration: 3 hrs | Region: HK Island | Difficulty: ★★★ | Shading Level: Low) [ Scenic Spot 2: Overlooking Kowloon East ]Photo Spot: 354 metres in elevation on Siu Ma ShanSection passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 2)Wong Nai Chung Reservoir to Lam Tin (Length: 6.6km | Duration: 2.5 hrs | Region: HK Island | Difficulty: ★★★ | Shading Level: Medium) [ Scenic Spot 3: Overlooking Tung Lung Chau ] Photo Spot: 180 metres in elevation on Devil's PeakSection passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 3) Lam Tin to Tseng Lan Shue (Length: 9.3km | Duration: 4hrs | Region: Sai Kung | Difficulty: ★★★ | Shading Level: Low) [ Scenic Spot 4: Overlooking Kowloon Peninsula ]Photo Spot: Jat's Incline Parking ViewpointSection passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 4) Tseng Lan Shue to Sha Tin Pass (Length: 8km | Duration: 3hrs | Region: Central New Territories | Difficulty: ★★★ | Shading Level: Low) [ Scenic Spot 5: Entrance of Catchwater ]Photo Spot: Tai Po Road near the Kowloon ReservoirSection passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 5) Sha Tin Pass to Tai Po Road (Length: 7.4km | Duration: 2.5hrs | Region: Central New Territories | Difficulty: ★★ | Shading Level: Medium) [ Scenic Spot 6: Artificial Waterfall under Shing Mun Reservoir Main Dam ]Photo Spot: Near the Shing Mun Reservoir Main Dam (*The waterfall as shown in the photo could only be seen after heavy rainfall in summer)Section passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 6) Tai Po Road to Shing Mun Reservoir (Length: 5.3km | Duration: 2hrs | Region: Central New Territories | Difficulty: ★★ | Shading Level: High) [ Scenic Spot 7: Paper-bark Trees Woodland ]Photo Spot: Near the Shing Mun ReservoirSection passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 7) Shing Mun Reservoir to Yuen Tun Ha (Length: 10.2km | Duration: 4hrs | Region: Central New Territories | Difficulty: ★★★ | Shading Level: Medium) [ Scenic Spot 8: Lam Tsuen River ]Photo Spot: Lam Tsuen River, near Parc VersaillesSection passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 8) Yuen Tun Ha to Cloudy Hill (Length: 9km | Duration: 4hrs | Region: North New Territories | Difficulty: ★★★★ | Shading Level: Low) [ Scenic Spot 9: Overlooking Plover Cove ]Photo Spot: 511 metres in elevation on Hsien Ku FungSection passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 9) Cloudy Hill to Pat Sin Leng (Length: 10.6km | Duration: 4.5hrs | Region: North New Territories | Difficulty: ★★★★ | Shading Level: Low) [ Scenic Spot 10: Deserted Village ]Photo Spot: Near Upper Wang Shan Keuk VillageThe section passed by: Wilson Trail (Section 10) Pat Sin Leng to Nam Chung (Length: 6.8km | Duration: 2.5hrs | Region: North New Territories | Difficulty: ★★★★ | Shading Level: High) *For more about the Wilson Trail, please visit the "Enjoy Hiking" website. (The images and the information are provided by Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department)
Ten landscapes and Ten characters – the fantastic MacLehose Trail

Ten landscapes and Ten characters – the fantastic MacLehose Trail

Ten landscapes and Ten characters – the fantastic MacLehose Trail This year is the 40th anniversary of the MacLehose Trail. Rated by the National Geographic as one of the top 20 dream trails in the world, the MacLehose Trail definitely worth a visit, at least a section, by every Hong Konger.This 100-kilometre trail is divided into ten sections, traversing the New Territories from East to West through eight country parks namely Sai Kung East, Sai Kung West, Ma On Shan, Lion Rock, Kam Shan, Shing Mun, Tai Mo Shan and Tai Lam. If you have ever visited any of one section, you would probably find it amazing with There are coastline, mountains, valleys and reservoirs. The trail offers hikers beautiful countryside scenery in New Territories as well as overlooking view of the cityscape of the Kowloon Peninsula. This famous trail has been named as one of the world's 20 dream trails by the National Geographic.Each of the ten sections is quite unique indeed. If you have geared up but are yet to decide which section to start for your journey, watch the ten videos below produced by the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department now for more details of the landscapes and characters of the MacLehose Trail! "MacLehose Trail Section 1: Extraordinary Craftsmanship" Pak Tam Chung to Long KeStarting Point: Pak Tam ChungFinishing Point: Long KeLength: 10.6 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 2: Boundless Nature" Long Ke to Pak Tam AuStarting Point: Long KeFinishing Point: Pak Tam AuLength: 13.5 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 3: Unwind Yourself" Pak Tam Au to Kei Ling HaStarting Point: Pak Tam AuFinishing Point: Kei Ling HaLength: 10.2 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 4: Continous Challenges" Kei Ling Ha - Tate's CairnStarting Point: Kei Ling HaFinishing Point: Tate's CairnLength: 12.7 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 5: One Mountain One City" Tate's Cairn to Tai Po RoadStarting Point: Tate's CairnFinishing Point: Tai Po RoadLength: 10.6 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 6: Respect Nature" Tai Po Road to Shing MunStarting Point: Tai Po RoadFinishing Point: Shing Mun ReservoirLength: 4.6 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 7: Historical Traces" Shing Mun to Lead Mine PassStarting Point: Shing Mun ReservoirFinishing Point: Lead Mine PassLength: 6.2 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 8:Top of Hong Kong " Lead Mine Pass to Route TwiskStarting Point: Lead Mine PassFinishing Point: Route TwiskLength: 9.7 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 9: Enjoy the Serenity" Route Twisk to Tin Fu TsaiStarting Point: Route TwiskFinishing Point: Tin Fu TsaiLength: 6.3 kilometresClick here for detail map "MacLehose Trail Section 10: Picturesque Landscapes" Tin Fu Tsai to Tuen MunStarting Point: Tin Fu TsaiFinishing Point: Tuen MunLength: 15.6 kilometresClick here for detail map (Information provided by Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department)
FIVE must-go spots on Hong Kong Trail

FIVE must-go spots on Hong Kong Trail

The Hong Kong Trail (50 km) traverses all the five country parks on Hong Kong Island. It is divided into 8 sections, each with plenty of stunning views. Below are five scenic spots you should not miss!    Scenic Spot 1: Pinewood Battery Section passed by: Hong Kong Trail (Section 1)The Peak to Pok Fu Lam Reservoir RoadTransportation: Take public transport to Kotewall Road bus terminus. Then walk uphill along Hatton Road to Picnic Area Site No.1 in Lung Fu Shan Country Park. The Pinewood Battery is next to the picnic area. Pinewood Battery - Historical RelicsLocated in Lung Fu Shan Country Park, Pinewood Battery was an important point of coastal defence because it is situated at an area of elevated terrain looking out on the western mouth of Victoria Harbour.  Construction of the battery started in the late 19th century and was completed in 1905 as part of the British colonial government’s plan to strengthen the defence of the western part of Hong Kong Island. With the rise of airpower on the verge of the Second World War, Pinewood Battery became an anti-aircraft battery with facilities like barracks to defend against the Japanese Army, instead of the French or Russian forces.  It was later abandoned in 1941 when it was heavily shelled by Japanese artillery fire. Surprisingly, its command post, lookouts, magazines, and even the lavatory remain in good conditions, allowing visitors to learn about the wartime history along the 400-metre Pinewood Battery Heritage Trail...Read more    Scenic Spot 2: Lugard RoadSection passed by: Hong Kong Trail (Section 1)The Peak to Pok Fu Lam Reservoir RoadTransportation: Walk along Peak Road towards Peak Tower after arriving at the Peak. The start point is the entrance of Lugard Road. Lugard Road - Hong Kong’s most iconic view of Victoria HarbourThe bird’s eye view of Victoria Harbour from Victoria Peak is unquestionably Hong Kong’s most iconic view.  Apart from the pavilion scene often featured on postcards, an even more sweeping vista is offered at the start point of the Hong Kong Trail, Lugard Road.  Built between 1913 and 1914 with some narrow, cliff-side paths called plank roads, the hundred-year-old trail is named after the 14th Governor of Hong Kong, Sir Frederick Lugard. Not only is it a great spot to admire sunset and night views, but it is also where you can witness the extraordinary scene of our city enveloped in mist in spring. The Peak Trail is surrounded by lush forestry and moss-covered rocks, dotted with a variety of flora species throughout the year – between April and May pink flowers of the Lance-leaved Sterculia, come into bloom; from July to October white flowers of the Turn-in-the-wind, embellish the trail.  Together with antique stone benches and streetlights, it exudes an air of ancient elegance. Continue on to Harlech Road, which is to the southwest of Victoria Peak, and then stroll along the shaded tree-lined trail at Pok Fu Lam Reservoir.  It will instantly connect you from the bustling financial centre to a rural idyll on the western part of Hong Kong Island, which is yet another way to tell the stories of Hong Kong.Read more    Scenic Spot 3: Sunset View from High West Section passed by: Hong Kong Trail (Section 1)The Peak to Pok Fu Lam Reservoir RoadTransportation: Take public transport to the Peak and alight at the Peak terminus. Walk along Harlech Road for 30 minutes to reach High West picnic area. Then take the path next to the picnic site and walk uphill to High West. High West Viewing Point - Sunrise and SunsetTowering at an elevation of 494 metres as the fourth tallest mountain on Hong Kong Island, High West divides the prosperous Central and Western District from the tranquil Southern District.  Its summit, which can be reached by climbing a long flight of 600 steps, offers unobstructed views of the West Lamma Channel stretching to the horizon.  It also looks out on Lamma Island in the south and as far as the Lema Islands outside the territory.  As dusk approaches, the sun dips gently among the hills of Lantau Island, giving off a beautiful red sunset over the sky and the sea.  As you are busy taking photos of the scene in front of you, Victoria Harbour is also bathed in the glow of the setting sun, with skyscrapers on the waterfront sparkling before being lit at night...Read more    Scenic Spot 4: Stunning ReservoirSection passed by: Hong Kong Trail (Section 6) Mount Parker Road to Tai Tam RoadTransportation: Take public transport and alight at "Tai Tam Country Park" bus stop. Go to the opposite side where the entrance of Tai Tam Country Park is located. Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir Masonry Bridge - Hipster HitsThe architectural artistry during Hong Kong’s colonial era is best manifested in the Tai Tam Group of Reservoirs, which is one of the six prewar reservoirs in Hong Kong. Completed between 1888 and 1917, it consists of Tai Tam Upper Reservoir, Tai Tam Byewash Reservoir, Tai Tam Intermediate Reservoir, and Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir, featuring 22 century-old declared monuments.  In particular, the four masonry arch bridges that appear in the woods of Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir, alongside their reflections in the lake, are the most breathtaking.  These four bridges were built in the Victorian style and have been classified as Grade I historic buildings.  In fact, if you want to visit all the masonry bridges, Tai Tam Waterworks Heritage Trail is the place.  Located to the west of Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir, the trail lets you admire its own unique beauty.  Other highlights include the masonry aqueduct, the valve house and the dam, which are all worth a visit...Read more    Scenic Spot 5: Viewing the sea on Dragon's BackSection pass 5ed by: Hong Kong Trail (Section 8)To Tei Wan to Tai Long WanTransportation: Take public transport to "To Tei Wan" bus stop on Shek O Road to the entrance of Hong Kong Trail Section 8. Walk uphill along Hong Kong Trail Section 8. Shek O Peak - Viewing PointsAlthough Shek O Peak sits at Shek O Country Park at an altitude of only 284 metres, its footpath leads to D’Aguilar Peninsula, where turquoise waters in the surroundings that stretch to the horizon come into full view.  It belongs to Section 8 of the Hong Kong Trail, connecting with Wan Cham Shan along the ridgeline of the world-renowned Dragon’s Back . It got this name because of the resemblance of its meandering and undulating hills to the shape of the back ridge of a dragon.  The footpath also overlooks Big Wave Bay and Shek O, commands views of Tung Lung Island and Hong Kong’s southernmost island Po Toi Island in the distance, and offers vistas of the boundless South China Sea.  To enhance the public’s understanding of the nearby mountains and islands, there are information boards at the Dragon’s Back Viewing Point...Read more *Click for more information about the Hong Kong Trail, or visit the "Enjoy Hiking" website. (The images and the information are provided by Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department)
Red Leaves Express of Sweet Gum Woods of Tai Lam Country Park (2022-2023)

Red Leaves Express of Sweet Gum Woods of Tai Lam Country Park (2022-2023)

The Sweet Gum Woods in Tai Lam Country Park is a popular spot for enjoying autumn foliage every year. This year, don’t forget to wear a mask and keep social distancing when you are visiting the Woods for red leaves. You may also make reference to the Special Traffic News disseminated by Transport Department and the “Red leaves index” provided by Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department before setting off your trip.  Location of the Red Leaves: Sweet Gum WoodsMap: Tai Tong Shan RoadTransport InformationTake MTR bus route no. K66 at MTR Long Ping Station / Yuen Long Town or red minibuses at Hung Min Court and get off at Tai Tong Shan Road bus station. Walk along Tai Tong Shan Road uphill for about 60 minutes to reach Sweet Gum Woods. (*Please take note of the special traffic news from the Transport Department before setting off.) Special Traffic ArrangementMTR will operate a special service on Route K66A on 20.11.2022 and 27.11.2022, and on Saturdays, Sundays and Public Holidays between 3.12.2022 and 15.1.2023, from Long Ping Station to Tai Tong Shan Road (MTR Hotline: 2881 8888). Road ClosureThe section of Tai Tong Shan Road between the Pavilion and Tai Tong Shan Road Car Park will be intermittently closed to all vehicular traffic from about 7.00 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. daily on Saturdays, Sundays and Public Holidays from 3 December 2022 (Saturday) to 15 January 2023 (Sunday).Points to note:1) Please wear a mask, maintain good personal hygiene and keep social distancing.2) Share the use of the forest track. Safety comes first. Watch out for vehicles/bicycles.3) Share the natural scenery, refrain from stepping on or picking plants.4) Keep country parks clean. Sweet Gum Woods is a bin-free trail. Please take your litter home.5) Avoid one-off disposables. Let's go plastic-free. 
Hiking skills that you need to know

Hiking skills that you need to know

Hiking is a physical activity with both physical and mental benefits. It can improve your physical fitness and help you relax. You may need many different skills for any particular sport, and each sport, including hiking, has its unique skills. If you can master the skills of hiking, you can diminish energy loss and minimise the chance of getting hurt. Here are some hiking tips by Enjoy Hiking:  Uphill Maintain a natural pace and avoid making very large strides. Avoid climbing at high speed. Don't rest too frequently or for too long. When you feel tired, slow down instead of stopping. Tread only on secure stable ground, where there is enough foot room. Use the strength of your legs to climb. Avoid pulling yourself up by grasping small trees or branches, as they may break leading to a fall. Keep your upper body straight. When going up very steep slopes, don't go straight ahead. Move sideways and work your up in a series of zigzags.   Downhill Never run downhill ―this is a certain way to have a dangerous fall. Tread only on secure stable ground, with enough foot room. Avoid treading on wet slippery ground, especially wet clay or grasses. But if there is no other way, proceed with caution and keep your body low. Use the strength of your legs to descend. Avoid sliding down by grasping small trees or branches. This indicates you are half out of control. Branches can break and, even if they don't, you will damage the vegetation. Keep your upper body straight. When moving down very steep slopes, move sideways and work down in a series of zigzags.   Food and Drink Never eat or drink while moving. Relax to take refreshments. Don't hurry with your food or drink. Never drink untreated water from hill streams or eat any wild plants or mushrooms. Don't consume icy drinks immediately after a long hike, when your body temperature is still high. Never drink alcohol during a hike.   Foot Care Wear suitable hiking shoes. Wear new shoes on level ground a few times before going on a serious hike. This will ensure the surface material is soft and the shoes are comfortably worn in to the shape of your feet. Bootlaces should not be too tight. Wear two pairs of socks made of soft, fluffy and absorbent material. Trim your toenails, and try to keep your feet clean and dry. Stop walking if your feet are uncomfortable. Inspect them and treat any wounds promptly. If there are signs of blisters, put a plaster on the affected area. Blisters should be dressed with an absorbent plaster that eliminates moisture. Serious blisters should be treated with antiseptic. Pierce the blisters with a sterile pin and squeeze out any moisture. Avoid touching the wounds directly, and cover them with an antiseptic dressing right away. For soreness or cramps in the legs, massage the leg muscles. If possible, soak feet in warm water, or use a menthol-based heat rub ointment.   Moreover, to be well prepared for your next hiking trip, you may check out the following website for more information. A Guide for Hikers (Centre for Health Protection) Safety Hints on Hiking (Hiking Scheme)  Source: AFCD Enjoy Hiking website
 e-Book Highlights - Hills and Mountains – Guide to Hiking

e-Book Highlights - Hills and Mountains – Guide to Hiking

You may browse selected articles from below e-databases via E-Account; or Library card; or Smart Identity Card allowed for Library Purposes; AND Password.If you have never applied for a library card or E-Account of Hong Kong Public Libraries, please visit the Hong Kong Public Libraries website to know more aboout the application details.  《48 Peaks》 Introduction: Despite a fear of heights, Cheryl Suchors’ mid-life success depends on hiking the highest of the grueling White Mountains in New Hampshire. All forty-eight of them.Connecting with friends and with nature, Suchors redefines success: she discovers a source of spiritual nourishment, spaces powerful enough to absorb her grief, and joy in the persistence of love and beauty. 48 Peaks inspires us to believe that, no matter what obstacles we face, we too can attain our summits.    Author: Cheryl SuchorsPublisher: She Writes Press, 2018Source: Overdrive eBooks (Back to top) 《山野漫遊 : 女生行山指南》 (Please refer to the Chinese version)  Author: 鍾芯豫,楊樂陶Publisher: 萬里機構,2020Printed Book: Library CatalogueSource: SUEP e-Book (Back to top) 《行山動畫廊》 (Please refer to the Chinese version) Author: JoyeeWalkerPublisher: 萬里機構,2019Printed Book: Library CatalogueSource: SUEP e-Book (Back to top) 《漫走洛磯山脈10大私房路線 : 專業旅遊工作者25年經驗分享x超過3000次帶團全紀錄》 Introduction: (Please refer to the Chinese version) Author: 凱瑞Publisher: 雅書堂文化,2018Printed Book: Library CatalogueSource: HyRead ebook (Back to top) (The information is provided by Hong Kong Public Libraries)
Hong Kong Hiking Challenge Checkpoints (Kowloon and the New Territories)

Hong Kong Hiking Challenge Checkpoints (Kowloon and the New Territories)

From September to December this year, the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department organises the Hong Kong Hiking Challenge to encourage nature lovers and hikers to set off for the countryside and take on the challenge! Go outside and hike through the country parks, immerse yourself in the spectacular views and learn more about the unique stories of Hong Kong’s local flora and fauna, and discover the beauty of undulating mountain ridges. There are 25 checkpoints scattered in various scenic spots in the country parks, featuring a variety of picturesque views unique to Hong Kong’s countryside. Participants can plan their own routes to visit these checkpoints based on their interest, physical fitness and hiking experience. Use a smartphone to check in at the checkpoints to collect the unique local flora and fauna badges made for each checkpoint. You will also learn about the amazing biodiversity of Hong Kong! Collect a certain number of badges and you will get different rewards! Let the challenge begin!   Here are the 15 checkpoints in Kowloon and the New Territories:   [ Checkpoint 1: Hong Kong Reunification Pavilion (Kowloon Pass) ] Location: Lion Rock Country Park | Difficulty: ★★ Trail: MacLehose Trail (Section 5) Tate's Cairn to Tai Po Road | Open location on map The Hong Kong Reunification Pavilion was built in 1997 to commemorate Hong Kong's reunification with the Motherland, and it bears the inscription of the Chief Executive of Hong Kong, Tung Chee-hwa. From the pavilion, you can enjoy the cityscape of Kowloon in a myriad of lights and the Victoria Harbour. With the bustling city just beneath you, and mountains stretching out behind you, this combination weaves into a picturesque landscape second to none. [ Checkpoint 2: Biu Tsim Kok ] Location: Sai Kung East Country Park | Difficulty: ★Trail: Biu Tsim Kok - Viewing Points | Open location on map "Biu Tsim Kok" is a headland to the north of the High Island Reservoir East Dam. The hills are composed of volcanic hexagonal rock columns, creating a spectacular geological collage. This is one of the few places where you can see the hexagonal volcanic pillars from above, making it a popular spot for visitors to 'check in'. [ Checkpoint 3:Kiu Tsui Viewing Point ] Location: Kiu Tsui Country Park | Difficulty: ★ Trail: Sharp Island Geo Trail|Enjoy Hiking - Sharp Island - Waterscapes  Sharp Island Country Trail | Open location on map Sharp Island located in Port Shelter, Sai Kung, hosts a Geo Trail and a Country Trail. At high tide, Sharp Island and Kiu Tau are two islands; at low tide, a tombolo connecting the two islands is exposed, allowing visitors to access the islands on foot. The island's trails also offer a great view from Kiu Tsui Viewing Point to the east over the vast grasslands of Kau Sai Chau and Yim Tin Tsai area, or to the west over the tombolo. [ Checkpoint 4: Kei Ling Ha Coast (near Yung Shue O)  ] Location: Sai Kung West Country Park |Difficulty: ★ Trail: Cheung Sheung Country Trail | Open location on map Yung Shue O is located in the inner bay of Three Fathoms Cove, a calm bay full of fishing rafts. Three Fathoms Cove is surrounded by mountains, with the villages of San Wai and Lo Wai built along its shoreline, and huts scattered around the hillside, giving off a fishing village vibe. Nearby is the Cheung Sheung Country Trail; Cheung Sheung is a wetland on a highland surrounded by mountains. [ Checkpoint 5: Tai Hang Tun Kite Flying Area Viewing Point ] Location: Clear Water Bay Country Park | Difficulty: ★ Trail: Lung Ha Wan Country Trail Tai Hang Tun Kite-Flying Area | Open location on map The lush green hillside near Tai Hang Tun is Hong Kong's most open and scenic kite-flying site, offering a panoramic view of Hong Kong's south-eastern waters, from the Ninepin Group, Green Island, Tung Lung Chau, to Wang Lang Island, Beaufort Island and other islands in the south. Located on the eastern side of Hong Kong, far from the city's light pollution, the Kite Flying Area is ideal for star and moon gazing at night. At Tai Hang Tun, anyone, from children to grown-ups, can discover a unique and enjoyable countryside experience. [ Checkpoint 6: Kowloon Peak Viewing Point ] Location: Ma On Shan Country Park | Difficulty: ★ Trail: Sunset at Kowloon Peak Wilson Trail (Section 4) Tseng Lan Shue to Shatin Pass Road | Open location on mapFrom Kowloon Peak Viewing Point, you can enjoy the proximate view of Kowloon Peninsula, and on a clear day, even the view on both sides of the Victoria Harbour is clearly visible. As the sun sets and the sky blazes with different shades of orange-red with ever-changing clouds, the city lights up as if it is hustling for the next round of festivities. The splendid scene dotted with vivid colours is definitely a sight to behold. [ Checkpoint 7: Beacon Hill Viewing Point ] Location: Lion Rock Country Park | Difficulty: ★★Trail: MacLehose Trail (Section 5) Tate's Cairn to Tai Po Road | Open location on map Beacon Hill, named after the pen rest it resembles from a distance, offers a breath-taking view of the entire Kowloon Peninsula that even stretches to as far as Tseung Kwan O and Chai Wan. At sunset, you can fully take in the views of the blinking lights of the dynamic and vibrant city while basking in the warm rays of the receding sun. [ Checkpoint 8: Kowloon Reservoir ] Location: Kam Shan Country Park |Difficulty: ★ Trail: MacLehose Trail (Section 6) Tai Po Road to Shing Mun Kam Shan Tree Walk Kam Shan Family Walk | Open location on map A walk through Kam Shan Country Park brings the view of all four reservoirs of the Kowloon Reservoir Group– Kowloon Reservoir, Kowloon Secondary Reservoir, Kowloon Receiving Reservoir and Shek Lei Pui Reservoir. Attention often falls on Kowloon Reservoir, with its famous arched main dam, the valve house and the overflow dam, all of which are declared monuments. Take a break from the hustle and bustle of the city while you immerse in the calmness of the vast reservoir and the reflection of the sky. [ Checkpoint 9: Shing Mun Leisure Deck ] Location: Shing Mun Country Park | Difficulty: ★ Trail:  Shing Mun Leisure Deck | Open location on map Shing Mun Leisure Deck is a viewing point located on the eastern slope of Shing Mun Reservoir surrounded by the Reservoir and lush green mountains. When the water level is high in the reservoir, the Paperbark plantation is reflected everywhere, curating a poetic landscape of a picturesque mix of mountains and trees. [ Checkpoint 10: Tai Mo Shan Country Park Viewing Point (North) ] Location: Tai Mo Shan Country Park | Difficulty: ★★ Trail: Silvergrass on Tai Mo Shan  MacLehose Trail (Section 8) Lead Mine Pass to Route Twisk | Open location on map Tai Mo Shan is Hong Kong's highest peak, serving a 180-degree view of the Kam Tin plain from the northern viewing point. From high above, you can see as far as Lam Tsuen, Kai Kung Leng, Tai To Yan, and even Shenzhen. Tai Mo Shan offers different seasonal specials: in summer, the setting sun falls over Kam Tin plain at Pat Heung, colouring the distant Lau Fau Shan orange; in autumn and winter, the silvergrass dancing in the strong winds is common at this height. Looking back down from the peak, the view of the meandering road is a unique landmark of Tai Mo Shan. [ Checkpoint 10: Tai Mo Shan Country Park Viewing Point (North) ] [ Checkpoint 11: MacLehose Trail Section 9 Viewing Point ] Location: Tai Lam Country Park | Difficulty: ★ Trail: MacLehose Trail (Section 9) Route Twisk to Tin Fu Tsai | Open location on map This viewing point offers a panoramic view of Tsuen Wan, Rambler Channel and Stonecutters Island. Look further and observe countless ships busy scuttling within Victoria Harbour. Turn your sight to the container terminals, decorated by rainbow-coloured containers stacked up like a neat map of building bricks. [ Checkpoint 12: Reservoir Islands Viewpoint ] Location: Tai Lam Country Park | Difficulty: ★Trail: MacLehose Trail (Section 10) Tin Fu Tsai to Tuen Mun | Open location on map The Tai Lam Chung Reservoir, also known as Thousand-Island Lake, was completed in 1957 as the first reservoir built in Hong Kong after the Second World War. Located in an undulating river valley, the sight of islands of various sizes magically materialised after the area was flooded with water stored. The islands are vegetated with Chinese Red Pine, Slash Pine, Swamp Mahogany and Lemon-scented Gum, creating a lush green landscape on Thousand-Island Lake. [ Checkpoint 13: Lai Chi Wo Siu Ying Story Room ] Location: Plover Cove Country Park | Difficulty: ★ Trail: Lai Chi Wo  Lai Chi Wo Nature Trail | Open location on map The ancient Hakka village of Lai Chi Wo has a history of over 400 years; it is named after lychee which was once produced in abundance. The village has retained its traditional Hakka character in many aspects. With over 100 years of history, the village's ancestral hall, the Hip Tin Temple and the Hok Shan Monastery are listed as Grade III historic buildings. A trip to Lai Chi Wo sends you back in time to the old days of Hong Kong for a deep sense of the unique traditional Hakka culture. [ Checkpoint 14: Cloudy Hill ] Location: Pat Sin Leng Country Park | Difficulty: ★★★ Trail: Wilson Trail (Section 8) Yuen Tun Ha to Cloudy Hill  Wilson Trail (Section 9) Cloudy Hill to Pat Sin Leng | Open location on map Surrounded by serene valleys and lush green hillsides, Cloudy Hill is located at the junction of Sections 8 and 9 of the Wilson Trail. Atop its undulating ridge, breath-taking views of Tai Po City and Tolo Harbour unravel beneath you, immerse in this mountain paradise as a quick getaway from the repetitive city life. [ Checkpoint 15: Pak Tai To Yan Pavilion ] Location: Lam Tsuen Country Park |Difficulty: ★★★ Open location on map Tai To Yan literally means “large knife edge” in Chinese; from far, the mountain ridge resembles a knife blade resting on its spine with the edge pointing towards the sky. A narrow walkway lines the ridge sandwiched by near-vertical slopes on both sides. On top of the physical challenge, on a windy day, the hike might call for more willpower as you manoeuvre along the knife's edge. Take a break on the flat grass field and adjust the rhythm of your breath and your body before climbing the summit. For more about the Hong Kong Hiking Challenge event, please visit the "Hong Kong Hiking Challenge" website. (The images and the information are provided by the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department)

Financial Assistance

[Subsidy] Any Subsidy for Studying in the Mainland?

[Subsidy] Any Subsidy for Studying in the Mainland?

Definitely! There is a subsidy scheme for Hong Kong students who are pursuing studies in the Mainland. To ensure that no students will be deprived of post-secondary education for financial reasons, the Mainland University Study Subsidy Scheme (MUSSS) is available for Hong Kong students.   Mainland University Study Subsidy Scheme The MUSSS is available for eligible Hong Kong students pursuing undergraduate studies in 191 designated Mainland institutions. The MUSSS comprises two components: “means-tested subsidy” and “non-means-tested subsidy”. The subsidised period is the normal duration of the undergraduate programme pursued by the student concerned in a designated Mainland institution, and the subsidy is granted on a yearly basis.  Eligible applicants can only receive either a means-tested subsidy or a non-means-tested subsidy in a given academic year.  The MUSSS is not subject to any quota.   Application Procedures Students may submit applications through the MUSSS Electronic Application Platform or by post.  New applicants must submit their applications via the MUSSS Electronic Application Platform or send the completed application forms and supporting documents by post to the Education Bureau on or before 30 September 2022.   Details of the Mainland University Study Subsidy Scheme>> Application of the Mainland University Study Subsidy Scheme>>   Higher education institutions in the Mainland also offer their own scholarships, grants, fee remission, etc.  For details and requirements, please refer to the information from individual institutions.     Source: Education Bureau - Mainland University Study Subsidy Scheme   
[Subsidy] Subsidy Schemes for Local Studies

[Subsidy] Subsidy Schemes for Local Studies

If you decide to continue your study locally and need financial supports, no worry! You can pay attention to the following financial assistance schemes provided by the Student Finance Office of Working Family and Student Financial Assistance Agency. You can also use the tool “What am I eligible for?” to sort out the assistance scheme(s) which you may apply for and to calculate the estimated amount/level of assistance. 1. Tertiary Student Finance Scheme - Publicly-funded Programmes (TSFS) For students taking up exclusively UGC-funded or publicly-funded full-time programmes. 2. Non-Means-Tested Loan Scheme for Full-time Tertiary Students (NLSFT) For students pursuing programmes covered under the Tertiary Student Finance Scheme - Publicly-funded Programmes (TSFS). 3. Financial Assistance Scheme for Post-secondary Students (FASP) For students taking up full-time, locally-accredited, self-financing post-secondary education programmes. 4. Non-means-tested Loan Scheme for Post-secondary Students (NLSPS) For students pursuing programmes covered under the Financial Assistance Scheme for Post-secondary Students (FASP). 5. Extended Non-Means-Tested Loan Scheme (ENLS) For students pursuing specific post-secondary / continuing and professional education courses provided in Hong Kong 6. Student Travel Subsidy for Tertiary or Post-secondary Students For successful applicants of TSFS and FASP, attend full-time day courses up to first degree level and reside beyond 10 minutes walking distance from student’s normal place of study and travel to school by public transportation. Continuing Education Fund The Continuing Education Fund (CEF) subsidises adults who aspire to further their education through continuing education and training courses.  Eligible applicants may submit an unlimited number of claims for reimbursement of course fees on successful completion of CEF reimbursable courses up to a maximum sum of HK$25,000.  The co-payment ratios by learners (i.e. the percentage of course fee to be borne by learners) for the first HK$10,000 subsidy is 20% of the course fee and that for the remaining HK$15,000 subsidy is 40% of the course fee. Financial Assistance Scheme for Designated Evening Adult Education Courses Under the Financial Assistance Scheme for Designated Evening Adult Education Courses, you can be entitled to 30%, 50% or 100% reimbursement of the tuition fee paid, subject to meeting the prescribed criteria. Subsidy Scheme for Further Studies in the Mainland Students who are interested in applying to the Mainland higher education institutions, you may refer to [Subsidy] Any subsidy for Studying in the Mainland? for more information.   Source: Student Finance Office of the Working Family and Student Financial Assistance Agency
Financial Assistance for Secondary Students

Financial Assistance for Secondary Students

Scholarships School days can be one of life's most wonderful episodes. You learn new things and face new challenges. Students with outstanding performance may even win scholarships. So make the most of it! Scholarships are usually provided by funds, such as the Senior Secondary Education Awards of the Agricultural Products Scholarship Fund and Marine Fish Scholarship Fund, the Grantham Scholarships Fund, the Japanese Government (Monbukagakusho:MEXT) Scholarship (Undergraduate Student), the Education Scholarships Fund, and the Sir Edward Youde Memorial Fund (including Medals and Prizes). You can find other relevant scholarship information in the Life Planning Information Website of the Education Bureau and Student Finance Office, Working Family and Student Financial Assistance Agency. The Multi-faceted Excellence Scholarship The Multi-faceted Excellence Scholarship supports universities and tertiary institutions in admitting local students who excel in sports, arts and/or community services. Details can be found on the website of Youth Development Commission. Grants and loans  The Grantham Maintenance Grants provides maintenance grants to full-time Secondary 4 to Secondary 6 students as well as students studying certain full-time courses in the Hong Kong Institute of Vocational Education who are financially in need. In addition, the Sing Tao Charitable Foundation Students' Loan Fund offers interest-free emergency loans to Secondary 4 to Secondary 6 students who face sudden financial hardship due to adverse changes in family circumstances. Student Financial Assistance Scheme The Student Finance Office, Working Family and Student Finicial Assistance Agency currently administers various student financial assistance schemes to provide assistance to disadvantaged secondary students in the form of School Textbook Assistance, Student Travel Subsidy and Subsidy for Internet Access Charges. Students of Yi Jin Diploma can also apply for financial assistance and for those who meet the prescribed criteria will obtain 30% or 100% tuition fee reimbursement.  

National Education

Constitution Day (4 December)

Constitution Day (4 December)

The existing Constitution of the People's Republic of China (The Constitution) was adopted at the Fifth Session of the Fifth National People's Congress on 4 December 1982. The Constitution is the fundamental and supreme law of the state. As an important symbol and sign of the nation, it has the highest legal status, legal authority, as well as legal effect. With the aim of enhancing public awareness of the Constitution, promoting its spirit, strengthening its implementation and advancing China's overall law-based governance, the Standing Committee of the Twelfth National People's Congress decided at the Eleventh Session on 1 November 2014 to designate 4 December as the "Constitution Day" and that the nation will conduct promotion and education activities of the Constitution through multiple channels. Constitution Day Online Seminar To deepen public understanding of the constitutional basis of Hong Kong, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) Government and the Liaison Office of the Central People’s Government in HKSAR will co-organise a seminar on the Constitution Day (4 December) under the theme of "The Constitution and New Journey of the New Era'". Comprising a keynote speech and a panel discussion, the Seminar will also be livestreamed online, please refer to website of the Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Bureau (CMAB) for details. CMAB's Thematic Webpage For more information of the Constitution Day, please refer to CMAB's Thematic Webpage. You may click here to see the relevant video as well. National Education One-Stop Portal Moreover, details of Constitution Day-related activities and other national education events are on the Event Planning Calendar of the National Education One-Stop Portal.

After School Activities

Youth uniformed groups under disciplined and auxiliary services departments

Youth uniformed groups under disciplined and auxiliary services departments

The Government strives to nurture youths and support them in fully realising their potential. Youth uniformed groups offer important platforms for promoting youth development. To this end, most of the disciplined and auxiliary services departments have set up their own youth uniformed groups to nurture young people’s sense of social responsibility, enhance their law-abiding awareness and help them develop leadership skills through a series of classroom and physical training. Information about the youth uniformed groups under the disciplined and auxiliary services departments is listed below for easy reference. Junior Police Call The Hong Kong Police Force has all along been actively promoting youth development. With the mission of nurturing fight crime partners and future leaders, it founded its flagship youth organisation, the Junior Police Call (JPC), in 1974. Currently, Advanced Leaders and members of JPC Leader Corps who join foot drill training are uniformed to reinforce the sense of belonging. On top of organising regular leadership camps to build up young people’s resilience, team spirit and leadership skills, JPC has also launched new programmes, e.g. innovation and technology competitions, in recent years to enhance its appeal to young people. In April 2021, JPC introduced the Junior Police Call Mobile Application (JPC App) to facilitate the recruitment of new members and the participation of existing members. In addition, JPC implemented a new youth engagement strategy under the acronym “IDEAS” this year to highlight the elements of JPC’s activities, namely “Innovation”, “Discipline”, “Exposure”, “Adventure” and “Synergy”. With this new strategy, JPC has also launched a new awards scheme, with a view to enriching members’ learning experience systematically. Looking ahead, JPC will also offer youth exchange opportunities in the Greater Bay Area to let participants gain first-hand experience of the opportunities in the Greater Bay Area. >> Website of Junior Police Call (The video is in Chinese)   Fire and Ambulance Services Teen Connect The Fire Services Department (FSD) established its youth uniformed group, called the Fire and Ambulance Services Teen Connect (FAST Connect), in 2021.  FAST Connect aims to provide a learning platform for its members, arranging regular training and activities to equip them with a rich learning experience.  Apart from providing practical training on basic fire-fighting and rescue techniques, basic first-aid skills and fire safety knowledge, FAST Connect also covers national education (e.g. the Chinese-style foot drill) to enhance the sense of belonging to the country among youth.  Exchange sessions with community leaders and Hong Kong elite athletes are also arranged for members.  Through participating in the various training and activities arranged by FSD, young people can acquire new knowledge outside the classroom, learn more about the country’s development and build a good character, with a view to building a solid foundation for academic and career success in the future. >> Website of the Fire and Ambulance Services Teen Connect (The video is in Chinese) Immigration Department Youth Leaders Corps The Immigration Department (ImmD) established its uniformed group, the Immigration Department Youth Leaders Corps, in 2013. Presently, the uniformed group provides disciplinary and leadership training to local students from Secondary 1 to Secondary 6 in Hong Kong. The training programme covers knowledge about immigration matters, national education, foot drill, physical fitness, community services and outdoor training. It aims at developing members’ sense of discipline and team spirit, enhancing their sense of national identity, and instilling positive thinking and values through group activities. Members will receive training in the Immigration Service Institute of Training and Development and visit immigration facilities so as to deepen their understanding of ImmD’ s work. This will help those who are interested in joining the Department in future get prepared. Since September this year, dedicated instructors also host school-based meetings with a view to building closer rapport with members. (The video is in Chinese)   Customs Youth Leader Corps The Customs and Excise Department (C&ED) introduced the education-oriented programme, Customs YES, in 2021 for young people aged between 12 and 24. Groups, schools and non-governmental organisations interested in supporting and promoting youth development can also join as organisation members. The Customs YES programme aims at enhancing young people’s appreciation of C&ED’s work and fostering their positive values and sense of belonging to society. Its activities include Customs job orientation experience, summer internship programmes, adventure and leadership training and Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area exchange programmes. Customs YES also regularly holds theme-based (e.g. legal profession, innovation & technology, and logistics) career development workshops aim to help members understand the situation and development of various sectors through interactive activities such as site visits and sharing by sector specialists. Under the framework of diversified activities of Customs YES, C&ED has formed a new youth uniformed group called Customs Youth Leader Corps, which aims at nurturing members to be distinguished youth leaders. Apart from participating in Customs YES activities, members are required to attend regular assemblies and disciplinary training to acquire various skills and learn about C&ED’s work. >> Website of Customs Youth Leader Corps (The video is in Chinese) Rehabilitation Pioneer Leaders The Correctional Services Department (CSD) has been implementing the Rehabilitation Pioneer Project since 2008 to disseminate the message of “leading a law-abiding and drug-free life as well as supporting offender rehabilitation” to secondary school students and young people. Project activities include education talks in schools and organisations; visits to correctional institutions and experience sharing by persons in custody to enable participants to understand the consequences of committing crimes; and summer tours to large-scale infrastructure as well as rural schools and families in the Mainland in order to deepen participants’ understanding of national affairs. In 2018, CSD established its uniformed group, Rehabilitation Pioneer Leaders, targeting secondary school students. Participants attend regular meetings twice a month at venues such as the Staff Training Institute for foot drill, take part in teamwork and physical training, as well as join a wide range of activities such as life planning interviews and Training on the Operation of Online Channel. The aim is to broaden their horizons, foster discipline and promote law-abiding and inclusive values. >> Website of Rehabilitation Pioneer Leaders   Civil Aid Service Cadet Corps Founded in 1968, the Civil Aid Service (CAS) Cadet Corps has an establishment of more than 4 000 cadets. Committed to promoting youth work, CAS encourages young people to learn practical skills and develop leadership abilities and through which to build up self-confidence, sense of responsibility, self-discipline and the spirit to serve others. Cadets also take part in community service such as countryside conservation work, tree planting and visits to the elderly to prepare themselves for becoming responsible citizens. CAS provides a diversified array of training and activities for its cadets including life-saving, first-aid, foot drill, hiking, boating, sailing, outdoor programmes and national education courses, etc, and is planning to develop activities and training on virtual reality and unmanned aircraft to encourage cadets to explore in various dimensions. Exchange programmes for cadets to meet with young people in the Greater Bay Area have been organised in order to deepen their understanding of the development of the Greater Bay Area. >>Website of Civil Aid Service Cadet Corps (The video is in Chinese) >> Website of Civil Aid Service Cadet Corps Auxiliary Medical Service Cadet Corps The Auxiliary Medical Service (“AMS”) established its Cadet Corps in 2011 to encourage young people to acquire practical skills and develop their leadership abilities by taking part in healthcare training and activities. Apart from receiving healthcare training, cadets also take part in a wide range of events, such as first aid competitions, foot drill training, community service and national education exchange tours, etc. >> Website of Auxiliary Medical Service Cadet Corps Auxiliary Medical Service Cadet Corps The Auxiliary Medical Service (AMS) established its Cadet Corps in 2011 to encourage young people to, by taking part in healthcare training and activities, acquire practical skills and develop their leadership abilities. Major areas of the training include knowledge, prevention and handling of communicable and chronic diseases; conventional first aid and health-check training; and prevailing public hygiene and health issues (e.g. emotional / mental health and drug abuse). Apart from receiving healthcare training, cadets also take part in a wide range of events, such as first aid competitions, foot drill training, community service and national education exchange tours, etc. >> Website of Auxiliary Medical Service Cadet Corps Government Flying Service's Collaboration with Youth Uniformed Groups Although the Government Flying Service (GFS) does not have its own youth uniformed group, it has established various activity arrangements with different youth uniformed groups (such as the Hong Kong Air Cadet Corps (HKACC), the Scout Association and the Girl Guides Association).  Its collaboration with HKACC is particularly close.  Besides continuing to provide HKACC with the relevant programmes and activities, GFS will arrange officers to take part in HKACC’s leader training programme and give professional coaching to HKACC members aged 16 or above, providing experiential activities to help them learn more about the different facets of GFS’s work (including the work of Pilots, Air Crewman Officers, Aircraft Engineers, Air Medical Officers and Air Medical Nursing Officers).  This can promote young people’s understanding of GFS and their interest in the aviation industry.
Hobby & Interest

Hobby & Interest

Fishing Hobbies and interests usually reflect the characters of individuals. Sports lovers are usually seen on the move. Fashion lovers cannot wait to get their hands on the latest trends. And fans of fishing are usually more patient than most. So if you are one of these patient folks, you do not have to wait long for a great catch. In Hong Kong, fishing is fantastic out at sea. Likewise, fishing in reservoirs is just as much fun as fishing in the sea, plus you will not get seasick. Just remember that fishing in reservoirs is only allowed during the non-spawning season and also requires a licence. Philately Another hobby for patient types is philately. In fact, in Hong Kong, stamp collecting has over a hundred years of history. Modern stamp designs are a dynamic reflection of Hong Kong today. There are a variety of designs with different stamp themes. Buying philatelic products can be done online – taking the hassles out of queuing up at the post office. E-learning resources from RTHK Often, a hobby is more enjoyable after a bit of study. It can even lead to a career opportunity. E-learning resources from RTHK [Chinese version only] provide many different online courses. The most popular course is related to food, that is yummy dishes DIY [Chinese version only] course, which suit Hong Kong people’s palate best.
e-Book Highlights - Be Gentle with Yourself – Inspirational Stories

e-Book Highlights - Be Gentle with Yourself – Inspirational Stories

You may browse selected articles from below e-databases via E-Account; or Library card; or Smart Identity Card allowed for Library Purposes; AND Password.If you have never applied for a library card or E-Account of Hong Kong Public Libraries, please visit the Hong Kong Public Libraries website to know more aboout the application details.      《The Lost Art of Doing Nothing》 Introduction: Don’t you think it’s time for a break? Plagued – as we are – by non-stops pings and notifications, we have lost the knack of zoning out. Slacking off. Even when pandemic induced lockdowns forcibly cleared out calendars, many who I’m free! Filled their days with Netflix and doom-scrolling. How can we reclaim our free time (planned or not) to truly rest and reset? The Dutch have it figured out: with niksen. Perhaps their-best kept lifestyle secret, niksen is the art of doing, well, nothing. It’s the opposite of productivity, and it’s incredibly good for your mind, body, creativity, and wallet.  Author: Willems, MaartjePublisher: The Experiment, 2021Source: OverDrive eBooks (Back to top)   《你要走多遠》 (Please refer to the Chinese version)  Author: 余漢傑(Titus) 著, 梁小偉(Gary) 著Publisher: 聯合電子,2020Printed Book: Library CatalogueSource: SUEP eBooks (Back to top) 《不幹了!我開除了黑心公司》 (Please refer to the Chinese version) Author: 北川惠海 著;まざきももこ 插畫;古曉雯 譯Publisher: 台灣角川,2020Printed Book: Library CatalogueSource: HyRead eBooks (Back to top)   (The information is provided by Hong Kong Public Libraries)
Youth uniformed groups under disciplined and auxiliary services departments

Youth uniformed groups under disciplined and auxiliary services departments

The Government strives to nurture youths and support them in fully realising their potential. Youth uniformed groups offer important platforms for promoting youth development. To this end, most of the disciplined and auxiliary services departments have set up their own youth uniformed groups to nurture young people’s sense of social responsibility, enhance their law-abiding awareness and help them develop leadership skills through a series of classroom and physical training. Information about the youth uniformed groups under the disciplined and auxiliary services departments is listed below for easy reference. Junior Police Call The Hong Kong Police Force has all along been actively promoting youth development. With the mission of nurturing fight crime partners and future leaders, it founded its flagship youth organisation, the Junior Police Call (JPC), in 1974. Currently, Advanced Leaders and members of JPC Leader Corps who join foot drill training are uniformed to reinforce the sense of belonging. On top of organising regular leadership camps to build up young people’s resilience, team spirit and leadership skills, JPC has also launched new programmes, e.g. innovation and technology competitions, in recent years to enhance its appeal to young people. In April 2021, JPC introduced the Junior Police Call Mobile Application (JPC App) to facilitate the recruitment of new members and the participation of existing members. In addition, JPC implemented a new youth engagement strategy under the acronym “IDEAS” this year to highlight the elements of JPC’s activities, namely “Innovation”, “Discipline”, “Exposure”, “Adventure” and “Synergy”. With this new strategy, JPC has also launched a new awards scheme, with a view to enriching members’ learning experience systematically. Looking ahead, JPC will also offer youth exchange opportunities in the Greater Bay Area to let participants gain first-hand experience of the opportunities in the Greater Bay Area. >> Website of Junior Police Call (The video is in Chinese)   Fire and Ambulance Services Teen Connect The Fire Services Department (FSD) established its youth uniformed group, called the Fire and Ambulance Services Teen Connect (FAST Connect), in 2021.  FAST Connect aims to provide a learning platform for its members, arranging regular training and activities to equip them with a rich learning experience.  Apart from providing practical training on basic fire-fighting and rescue techniques, basic first-aid skills and fire safety knowledge, FAST Connect also covers national education (e.g. the Chinese-style foot drill) to enhance the sense of belonging to the country among youth.  Exchange sessions with community leaders and Hong Kong elite athletes are also arranged for members.  Through participating in the various training and activities arranged by FSD, young people can acquire new knowledge outside the classroom, learn more about the country’s development and build a good character, with a view to building a solid foundation for academic and career success in the future. >> Website of the Fire and Ambulance Services Teen Connect (The video is in Chinese) Immigration Department Youth Leaders Corps The Immigration Department (ImmD) established its uniformed group, the Immigration Department Youth Leaders Corps, in 2013. Presently, the uniformed group provides disciplinary and leadership training to local students from Secondary 1 to Secondary 6 in Hong Kong. The training programme covers knowledge about immigration matters, national education, foot drill, physical fitness, community services and outdoor training. It aims at developing members’ sense of discipline and team spirit, enhancing their sense of national identity, and instilling positive thinking and values through group activities. Members will receive training in the Immigration Service Institute of Training and Development and visit immigration facilities so as to deepen their understanding of ImmD’ s work. This will help those who are interested in joining the Department in future get prepared. Since September this year, dedicated instructors also host school-based meetings with a view to building closer rapport with members. (The video is in Chinese)   Customs Youth Leader Corps The Customs and Excise Department (C&ED) introduced the education-oriented programme, Customs YES, in 2021 for young people aged between 12 and 24. Groups, schools and non-governmental organisations interested in supporting and promoting youth development can also join as organisation members. The Customs YES programme aims at enhancing young people’s appreciation of C&ED’s work and fostering their positive values and sense of belonging to society. Its activities include Customs job orientation experience, summer internship programmes, adventure and leadership training and Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area exchange programmes. Customs YES also regularly holds theme-based (e.g. legal profession, innovation & technology, and logistics) career development workshops aim to help members understand the situation and development of various sectors through interactive activities such as site visits and sharing by sector specialists. Under the framework of diversified activities of Customs YES, C&ED has formed a new youth uniformed group called Customs Youth Leader Corps, which aims at nurturing members to be distinguished youth leaders. Apart from participating in Customs YES activities, members are required to attend regular assemblies and disciplinary training to acquire various skills and learn about C&ED’s work. >> Website of Customs Youth Leader Corps (The video is in Chinese) Rehabilitation Pioneer Leaders The Correctional Services Department (CSD) has been implementing the Rehabilitation Pioneer Project since 2008 to disseminate the message of “leading a law-abiding and drug-free life as well as supporting offender rehabilitation” to secondary school students and young people. Project activities include education talks in schools and organisations; visits to correctional institutions and experience sharing by persons in custody to enable participants to understand the consequences of committing crimes; and summer tours to large-scale infrastructure as well as rural schools and families in the Mainland in order to deepen participants’ understanding of national affairs. In 2018, CSD established its uniformed group, Rehabilitation Pioneer Leaders, targeting secondary school students. Participants attend regular meetings twice a month at venues such as the Staff Training Institute for foot drill, take part in teamwork and physical training, as well as join a wide range of activities such as life planning interviews and Training on the Operation of Online Channel. The aim is to broaden their horizons, foster discipline and promote law-abiding and inclusive values. >> Website of Rehabilitation Pioneer Leaders   Civil Aid Service Cadet Corps Founded in 1968, the Civil Aid Service (CAS) Cadet Corps has an establishment of more than 4 000 cadets. Committed to promoting youth work, CAS encourages young people to learn practical skills and develop leadership abilities and through which to build up self-confidence, sense of responsibility, self-discipline and the spirit to serve others. Cadets also take part in community service such as countryside conservation work, tree planting and visits to the elderly to prepare themselves for becoming responsible citizens. CAS provides a diversified array of training and activities for its cadets including life-saving, first-aid, foot drill, hiking, boating, sailing, outdoor programmes and national education courses, etc, and is planning to develop activities and training on virtual reality and unmanned aircraft to encourage cadets to explore in various dimensions. Exchange programmes for cadets to meet with young people in the Greater Bay Area have been organised in order to deepen their understanding of the development of the Greater Bay Area. >>Website of Civil Aid Service Cadet Corps (The video is in Chinese) >> Website of Civil Aid Service Cadet Corps Auxiliary Medical Service Cadet Corps The Auxiliary Medical Service (“AMS”) established its Cadet Corps in 2011 to encourage young people to acquire practical skills and develop their leadership abilities by taking part in healthcare training and activities. Apart from receiving healthcare training, cadets also take part in a wide range of events, such as first aid competitions, foot drill training, community service and national education exchange tours, etc. >> Website of Auxiliary Medical Service Cadet Corps Auxiliary Medical Service Cadet Corps The Auxiliary Medical Service (AMS) established its Cadet Corps in 2011 to encourage young people to, by taking part in healthcare training and activities, acquire practical skills and develop their leadership abilities. Major areas of the training include knowledge, prevention and handling of communicable and chronic diseases; conventional first aid and health-check training; and prevailing public hygiene and health issues (e.g. emotional / mental health and drug abuse). Apart from receiving healthcare training, cadets also take part in a wide range of events, such as first aid competitions, foot drill training, community service and national education exchange tours, etc. >> Website of Auxiliary Medical Service Cadet Corps Government Flying Service's Collaboration with Youth Uniformed Groups Although the Government Flying Service (GFS) does not have its own youth uniformed group, it has established various activity arrangements with different youth uniformed groups (such as the Hong Kong Air Cadet Corps (HKACC), the Scout Association and the Girl Guides Association).  Its collaboration with HKACC is particularly close.  Besides continuing to provide HKACC with the relevant programmes and activities, GFS will arrange officers to take part in HKACC’s leader training programme and give professional coaching to HKACC members aged 16 or above, providing experiential activities to help them learn more about the different facets of GFS’s work (including the work of Pilots, Air Crewman Officers, Aircraft Engineers, Air Medical Officers and Air Medical Nursing Officers).  This can promote young people’s understanding of GFS and their interest in the aviation industry.
Hobby & Interest

Hobby & Interest

Fishing Hobbies and interests usually reflect the characters of individuals. Sports lovers are usually seen on the move. Fashion lovers cannot wait to get their hands on the latest trends. And fans of fishing are usually more patient than most. So if you are one of these patient folks, you do not have to wait long for a great catch. In Hong Kong, fishing is fantastic out at sea. Likewise, fishing in reservoirs is just as much fun as fishing in the sea, plus you will not get seasick. Just remember that fishing in reservoirs is only allowed during the non-spawning season and also requires a licence. Philately Another hobby for patient types is philately. In fact, in Hong Kong, stamp collecting has over a hundred years of history. Modern stamp designs are a dynamic reflection of Hong Kong today. There are a variety of designs with different stamp themes. Buying philatelic products can be done online – taking the hassles out of queuing up at the post office. E-learning resources from RTHK Often, a hobby is more enjoyable after a bit of study. It can even lead to a career opportunity. E-learning resources from RTHK [Chinese version only] provide many different online courses. The most popular course is related to food, that is yummy dishes DIY [Chinese version only] course, which suit Hong Kong people’s palate best.
e-Book Highlights - Be Gentle with Yourself – Inspirational Stories

e-Book Highlights - Be Gentle with Yourself – Inspirational Stories

You may browse selected articles from below e-databases via E-Account; or Library card; or Smart Identity Card allowed for Library Purposes; AND Password.If you have never applied for a library card or E-Account of Hong Kong Public Libraries, please visit the Hong Kong Public Libraries website to know more aboout the application details.      《The Lost Art of Doing Nothing》 Introduction: Don’t you think it’s time for a break? Plagued – as we are – by non-stops pings and notifications, we have lost the knack of zoning out. Slacking off. Even when pandemic induced lockdowns forcibly cleared out calendars, many who I’m free! Filled their days with Netflix and doom-scrolling. How can we reclaim our free time (planned or not) to truly rest and reset? The Dutch have it figured out: with niksen. Perhaps their-best kept lifestyle secret, niksen is the art of doing, well, nothing. It’s the opposite of productivity, and it’s incredibly good for your mind, body, creativity, and wallet.  Author: Willems, MaartjePublisher: The Experiment, 2021Source: OverDrive eBooks (Back to top)   《你要走多遠》 (Please refer to the Chinese version)  Author: 余漢傑(Titus) 著, 梁小偉(Gary) 著Publisher: 聯合電子,2020Printed Book: Library CatalogueSource: SUEP eBooks (Back to top) 《不幹了!我開除了黑心公司》 (Please refer to the Chinese version) Author: 北川惠海 著;まざきももこ 插畫;古曉雯 譯Publisher: 台灣角川,2020Printed Book: Library CatalogueSource: HyRead eBooks (Back to top)   (The information is provided by Hong Kong Public Libraries)
Locate all the 15 “check-in spots” and get the “CT60+ Cycling Rewards”

Locate all the 15 “check-in spots” and get the “CT60+ Cycling Rewards”

To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the establishment of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region as well as to promote the opened cycle track sections of the New Territories Cycle Track Network (NTCTN), the Civil Engineering and Development Department (CEDD) is holding the “CT60+ Cycling Rewards” from 17 September to 17 December 2022. Members of the public may participate in this event by cycling along the cycle track sections between Tuen Mun and Ma On Shan and at the Tsuen Wan waterfront of the NTCTN. They can enjoy the beautiful sceneries and cultural attractions while looking for the “check-in spots” along the cycle track sections and collecting “check-in” records. Those who have collected the required number of “check-in” records can redeem souvenirs. Where are the 15 “check-in spots”? A total of 15 “check-in spots” will be set up in two phases near the scenic spots located along the opened cycle track sections of the NTCTN during the event period. To participate, scan the QR codes displayed at these “check-in spots” with a mobile phone to enter the event website. Provide a mobile phone number to register for a game account.  Take AR photos with the mascots.  Those who have collected the required number of “check-in” records and completed the redemption process in the account within the event period can redeem souvenirs. For details, please visit the NT Cycle Track Network website. The mascots “Mr. B” , “Drainy”, “Big Waster”, “Anyone”, “Keep Clean Ambassador Ah Tak”, “Lazy Lion”, “Dr Tin”, “Water Save Dave”, and “Mr. Safegg” are ready at these “check-in spots” to explore the NTCTN with you!      The 10 “check-in spots” in Phase 1 Period: 17 Sep – 31 Oct 2022Area: The cycle track sections between Sheung Shui and Ma On Shan; and the Tsuen Wan waterfront section   1. Sha Tin Che Kung Temple(The mascot in AR filter: Lazy Lion) The ancient Sha Tin Che Kung Temple draws believers from all over Hong Kong. Every Chinese New Year, worshippers flock to the Temple. In recent years, it has even become a popular site of attraction among travellers visiting Hong Kong. Although it is impossible to know when it was built, the stele in the old temple structure says it was renovated and reconstructed in the 16th year of the reign of Guangxu in the Qing Dynasty (1890).   2. Shatin Twin Bridge(The mascot in AR filter: Drainy)   3. Ma On Shan Hang Tai Road Resting Station(The mascot in AR filter: Keep Clean Ambassador Ah Tak)   4. Tai Po Kau Tide Gauge Station(The mascot in AR filter: Dr Tin) Tai Po Kau Tide Gauge Station is located at the end of Tai Po Railway Pier and it is an essential facility of the Hong Kong Observatory for monitoring tide levels in Tolo Harbour. The existing station was built in the 1960s and needs to be reconstructed to maintain its functions. A design competition to collect innovative ideas for the reconstruction of the station was held in November 2020. The competition was co-organised by the Hong Kong Observatory, CEDD, the Architectural Services Department and the Hong Kong Institute of Architects. The winning entry “Revealing the Tip of Iceberg” will be adopted for the reconstruction.   5. Tai Mei Tuk(The mascot in AR filter: Water Save Dave) Tai Mei Tuk is a wonderful place for relaxing. A popular holiday destination for people seeking to escape from the pressures of urban life, it is where city dwellers come to fish, cycle, boat and barbecue. One will find families flying kites and cycling back and forth along the dam, with the water of Plover Cove lapping against one side of the dam and Tolo Harbour on the other.  6. Luen Wo Hui(The mascot in AR filter: Anyone) Luen Wo Hui, built in 1951, is one of the oldest markets in Hong Kong. Adopting an early-modernist design, it is classified as a Grade III historic building. The Fanling Environmental Resource Centre located inside the Luen Wo Hui Government Offices nearby has been open for more than 17 years and provides the public with an easy access to environmental information. There are exhibition zones featuring different themes such as air quality, waste reduction and global environmental issues. It is a good location where parents can bring their children to read books and have fun.  7. Sheung Yue River, Long Valley, Ho Sheung Heung(The mascot in AR filter: Mr. B) Sheung Yue River is a scenic spot, and cycling along the river is really relaxing. Besides large water pipes, which are full of cinematic feelings, visitors may see the wild Chinese silver grass, and enjoy sweet soybean milk and silky tofu pudding in a soy factory nearby. In short, one may have multiple pleasures from various sources, such as vision, taste and photo-shooting, in a single trip.  8. Tsuen Wan Riviera Park Resting Station(The mascot in AR filter: Big Waster)   9. Tsuen Wan Waterfront Cycling Entry / Exit Hub(The mascot in AR filter: Mr. Safegg)   10. Hoi On Road Resting Station(The mascot in AR filter: Lazy Lion)        The 5 “check-in spots” in Phase 2Period: 1 Nov – 17 Dec 2022Area: The full track between Tuen Mun and Ma On Shan; and the Tsuen Wan waterfront section   11. Butterfly Beach(The mascot in AR filter: Keep Clean Ambassador Ah Tak) Butterfly Beach, the second longest beach in Tuen Mun, attracts many beach-goers with its sound facilities. Next to the Beach is a barbecue site which has the largest number of barbecue pits in Hong Kong. It is close to Butterfly Village Market where you can easily buy barbecue supplies. Butterfly Bay in the west is a good place to enjoy the sunset.   12. Tin Hau Bridge(The mascot in AR filter: Big Waster) The Tuen Mun River Footbridge, also known as “Tin Hau Bridge” and about 86 m long, adopts a design of traditional Chinese elements to tie in with the architectural style of the adjacent Tin Hau Temple Plaza. In addition to facilitating the movements of local residents, the Bridge serves as the starting point of the Tuen Mun Heritage Trail, telling the story of Tuen Mun.   13. Tin Shui Wai Cycling Entry / Exit Hub(The mascot in AR filter: Anyone)   14. Yuen Long Castle Peak Road (Tam Mei) Resting Station(The mascot in AR filter: Dr Tin)   15. The Man Tin Cheung Park(The mascot in AR filter: Water Save Dave) Located between the Castle Park Road San Tin Section and the San Tin Highway, Man Tin Cheung Park was established to commemorate Man Tin Cheung, the patriotic general of Southern Song Dynasty. Visitors may learn more about the life of General Man through a visit, while appreciating his loyalty and righteousness - “Everyone must die. Let me but leave a loyal heart shining in the pages of history”.    
New extension of Oil Street Art Space becomes an Instagram-worthy hotspot!

New extension of Oil Street Art Space becomes an Instagram-worthy hotspot!

In order to provide more space to inspire greater imagination, Oi! rolled out an expansion project in 2019, in which an adjacent outdoor space of over 3,000 square metres was integrated with the original premises. The new space features a new two-storey building incorporating an exhibition and multipurpose venue. The brand new space is open to the public now, while Oi! is now launching 10 art projects, hoping to provide the district with more community art and leisure space, and to become a cultural landmark in Hong Kong. What is "Oi!"?Oi! is housed in the former clubhouse of the Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club, which was opened in 1908 on what was the waterfront in North Point. Following land reclamation work there in the 1930s, the building was initially converted into staff quarters for the Government Supplies Department and later into a storage facility for the Antiquities and Monuments Office. After it was allocated to the Art Promotion Office for revitalisation and restoration, the red-bricked Grade II historic building with a tile roof was renamed the Oil Street Art Space (Oi!), which opened to the public in 2013.Its name links the ideas behind it with its location: Oi! sounds similar to the address in Cantonese and conveys a call for people's attention while providing a platform where they can realise their dreams in art. The 10 art exhibitions and public engagement activities The 10 art exhibitions and public engagement activities launched by Oi! include two highlight exhibitions in celebration of the 25th anniversary of the establishment of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region: "Joyful Trees (Arbores Laetae)" and "d'strict Remix". Other art projects include "Digital Muse", "Our Living Library", "Neverending Garden", "XCHANGE", "People-Plant-Place", "Three Gardens", "Oi! Sunday", and the outdoor artworks "Branching Benches" and "Mapping Oi!". Through this series of projects, Oi! sets out to connect art and the community, and to build a sustainable future through collective creativity and collaboration. For details of the art projects, please visit the website of Oi! or call 2512 3000 for enquiries.
The Hong Kong Award For Young People Jockey Club Duke of Edinburgh Training Camp

The Hong Kong Award For Young People Jockey Club Duke of Edinburgh Training Camp

After six years of redevelopment work, The Hong Kong Award For Young People (AYP) Jockey Club Duke of Edinburgh Training Camp was reopened in March 2021. Let's get to know the new features of the camp site: Innovative Design and State-of-the-art Facilities The new training camp provides diverse and innovative camp activities to young people and families. It is the only camp site in Hong Kong that has an official HADO AR Dodgeball court. It enables the public to experience emerging sports at a reasonable price. Besides, the Adventure Park is the first rope course requiring teamwork of four to finish, whereas the climbing wall allows participants to play sports climbing in the day time and AR climbing at night. The semi-indoor Challenge Course is built in a cover area so that climbers can challenge themselves at night too. Sustainable Elements in Building Design, Youth Service and Camp Management The training camp was awarded BEAM Plus Provisional Silver Rating for adopting sustainable development in the design, construction, operations and maintenance of the building. The introduction of natural daylight reduces the use of indoor lighting. Also, the bridge between the South and North wings facilitates ventilation and avoids the “wall effect”. Besides, the installation of solar panels and solar-powered tables will help to generate renewable energy. Light and motion sensors are installed in the halls to improve energy efficiency. AYP integrates sustainable elements into youth service and camp management to bring bigger benefits to the community.   Pilot Scheme on Youth Outdoor Adventure Training Activities Want to try out the facilities at the new training camp? Here comes the opportunity! Organised by the Home and Youth Affairs Bureau and Youth Development Commission and co-organised by AYP, the “Pilot Scheme on Youth Outdoor Adventure Training Activities” is now open for application. This scheme incorporates innovative elements into outdoor adventure training, such as Sports Adventure, Eco Adventure and Technology Adventure. Details of the scheme are as follows: Pilot Scheme Belief: Improve young people's physical and mental well-being, foster positive thinking, sense of collectivism and resilience in times of difficulties, and emphasize the importance of cultivating positive value and mentality of young people during their growth and development.Content: Rope Course, Recycling Workshop, Innovative Sports Game etc. to be held at the newly renovated training campTarget: F.3-F.5 StudentsCamp Type: Participants could choose from Day Camp for 1, 2 or 3 days OR Overnight Camp for 3 days and 2 nights or 4 days and 3 nightsDate: from July 2021Fee: The scheme fee is free (assigned transportation and meals included)Enquiry: 2157 8610 Please visit the >>official website<< for application method and other details.
LCSD's barbecue sites to resume normal operation (includes the list of LCSD's barbecue sites)

LCSD's barbecue sites to resume normal operation (includes the list of LCSD's barbecue sites)

In view of the relaxation of some social distancing measures announced by the Government, barbecue sites under The Leisure and Cultural Services Department (LCSD) resume normal operation from 3 November gradually. Persons using the facilities of the barbecue sites are required to comply with the measures for the prevention of COVID-19 so as to reduce the chances of spreading the virus in the community. List of LCSD's barbecue sites (Open 24 hours daily) Big Wave Bay Beach (Big Wave Bay Road, Shek O, Hong Kong)Facilities: 20 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2809 4558 Big Wave Bay Picnic Area (Big Wave Bay Road, Shek O, Hong Kong)Facilities: 6 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2555 0103 Chung Hom Kok Beach (Chung Hom Kok Road, Hong Kong)Facilities: 25 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2813 0454 Chung Hom Kok Park (Chung Hom Kok Road, Hong Kong)Facilities: 3 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2555 0103 Deep Water Bay Beach (Island Road, Deep Water Bay, Hong Kong)Facilities: 33 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2812 0228 Hair Pin Beach (Stanley Beach Road, Stanley, Hong Kong)Facilities: 22 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2813 0217 Name of Venue: Middle Bay Beach (South Bay Road, Repulse Bay, Hong Kong)Facilities: 9 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2812 2546 Shek O Beach (Shek O Road, Shek O, Hong Kong)Facilities: 39 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2809 4557 Shek O Headland Picnic Area (Shek O Headland Road, Shek O, Hong Kong)Facilities: 3 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2555 0103 South Bay Beach (South Bay Road, Repulse Bay, Hong Kong)Facilities: 19 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2812 2468 St. Stephen's Beach (Wong Ma Kok Path, Stanley, Hong Kong)Facilities: 14 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2813 1872 Stanley Main Beach (Stanley Beach Road, Stanley, Hong Kong)Facilities: 15 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2813 0217 Turtle Cove Beach (Tai Tam Road, Stanley, Hong Kong)Facilities: 12 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2813 0386 Waterfall Bay Park (Waterfall Bay Road, Wah Fu Estate, Aberdeen, Hong Kong)Facilities: 10 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2555 0103 Lion Rock Park (Chuk Yuen Road, Wong Tai Sin, Kowloon)Facilities: 26 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2337 4648 Cheung Po Chai Cave Picnic Area (Cheung Po Chai Road, Cheung Chau)Facilities: 6 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2852 4845 Hung Shing Yeh Beach (Hung Shing Yeh Beach, Yung Shue Wan, Lamma Island)Facilities: 9 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2982 0352 Lo So Shing Beach (Lo So Shing Beach, Sok Kwu Wan, Lamma Island)Facilities: 6 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2982 8252 Lo Tik Wan Barbecue Area (Lo Tik Wan, Lamma)Facilities: 2 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2852 4845 Po Chu Tam BBQ Area (Tai O, Lantau Island)Facilities: 3 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2852 4845 Pui O Beach (Pui O Beach, Lantau)Facilities: 6 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2984 7675 Silver Mine Bay Beach (Silver Mine Bay Beach, Lantau Island)Facilities: 24 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2984 8229 Tong Fuk Barbecue Area (Tong Fuk, Lantau Island)Facilities: 3 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2852 4845 Tung Wan Barbecue Area, Peng Chau (Tung Wa, Peng Chau)Facilities: 6 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2852 4845 Upper Cheung Sha Beach (Upper Cheung Sha Beach, Lautau Island.)Facilities: 7 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2980 2114 Clear Water Bay First Beach (Tai Wan Tau, Clear Water Bay Road)Facilities: 15 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2719 8308 Hap Mun Bay Beach (Hap Mun Bay, Sharp Island)Facilities: 22 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2796 6788 Kiu Tsui Beach (Kiu Tsui, Sharp Island)Facilities: 13 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2798 8171 Trio Beach (Trio (Hebehaven) Beach)Facilities: 20 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2792 3672 Kwei Tei Street Garden (Kwei Tei Street, Fo Tan, Sha Tin)Facilities: 2 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2634 0147 Lok Shun Path Barbecue Area (Lok Shun Path, Sha Tin)Facilities: 6 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2634 0147 Tai Mei Tuk Barbecue Area (Tai Po Tai Mei Tuk Road)Facilities: 40 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 3183 9020 Anglers' Beach (13 milestone, Castle Peak Road - Sham Tseng)Facilities: 7 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2491 1229 / 2212 9738 Approach Beach (10 1/2 milestone, Castle Peak Road - Ting Kau)Facilities: 2 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2491 1229 / 2212 9738 Gemini Beaches (12 milestone, Castle Peak Road - Sham Tseng)Facilities: 2 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2491 1229 / 2212 9738 Hoi Mei Wan Beach (11 3/4 milestone, Castle Peak Road - Ting Kau)Facilities: 3 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2491 1229 / 2212 9738 Butterfly Beach Park (Area 45, Lung Mun Road, Tuen Mun (Near Melody Garden))Facilities: 80 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2404 5979 Cafeteria Old Beach (18 3/4 milestone,Castle Peak Road)Facilities: 23 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2450 6306 Castle Peak Beach (19 milestone,Castle Peak Road)Facilities: 27 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2450 6326 Kadoorie Beach (18 3/4 milestone,Castle Peak Road)Facilities: 6 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2450 6336 Wang Toi Shan Playground (Wang Toi Shan, Fan Kam Road, Pat Heung, Yuen Long)Facilities: 4 barbecue pitsEnquiry No: 2478 4342 Please refer to the LCSD website for more details.
Education Bureau Life Planning Information Website
National Education One-stop Portal

Social Feed

Last Update Date: 23 Nov 2022