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The Water Safety Slogan and Graphic Design Competition 2021

The Water Safety Slogan and Graphic Design Competition 2021, jointly organised by the Leisure and Cultural Services Department and the Hong Kong Life Saving Society, aims to enhance public awareness of water safety. The competition is divided into the Primary and Secondary School Sections and open to all primary and secondary school students.

Chemical Safety Poster and Sticker Design Competition 2021

The Chemical Safety Poster and Sticker Design Competition 2021 is jointly orgainzed organized by the Chemical Safety and Health Advisory Committee of the Occupational Safety and Health Council (OSHC), the Labour Department and the Education Bureau. It aims to facilitate participants to show their creativity in promoting the message of safe handling of chemicals. Participants are expected to develop a positive attitude towards the safe handling, storage and disposal of chemicals, and hence adopt safe practices. The competition is categorized into Primary, Secondary and Open Groups. Participants shall submit one poster and/or one set of stickers. Winning entries may be modified and adopted for promotional materials.

Sponsorship for International Design Awards 2020 Opens for Application

Have you thought of promoting your design to places outside Hong Kong and being recognised by international awards? Here is a sponsorship programme to back your plan! The Sponsorship for International Design Awards (SIDA) is calling for applications. Sponsored by Create Hong Kong ("CreateHK"), HKDA organises the sponsorship programme which aims to provide financial aid to Hong Kong designers and local design-applying enterprises to participate in representative international award competitions. Eligible Hong Kong designers and design-applying enterprises can apply for a financial aid up to HK$200,000 per each design unit to participate in 24 specified international competitions and awards to cover the full entry fees and promotion fees. The financial aid of SIDA 2020 will be based on a list of 24 specified international competitions/awards which have been endorsed by 14 local professional design associations and institutions and divided into 7 design categories (Multi, Graphics, Spatial, Product, Fashion, Digital Media and Design Education).   Moreover, awardees of 5 local design competitions can also apply for the sponsorship for participating in the international awards, which are “Global Design Award 2018”, “Design for Asia Awards 2019”, “Hong Kong Smart Design Awards 2019”, “Asia Pacific Interior Design Awards” and “Kam Fan Awards 2019”. Interested designers and local design-applying enterprises can submit their applications and learn more about the entry guide and awards categories on SIDA website. The application deadline is exteneded to 31 July 2021. Introductory video about SIDA  

Architect

In addition to the exterior, space and functions of a building, harmony with the surrounding environment and compliance with relevant building regulations are also part and parcel of the equation. Hence various fields of expertise, including aesthetics, engineering, management and law, are brought to bear by the Architect throughout the entire process. The use of innovative softwares, e.g., 3D interior design programmes, has greatly facilitated the work of an Architect. To be an Architect, one should be gifted at drawing and able to draw one’s architectural designs. Moreover, one should have a deep understanding of the surrounding environment and cultural matters, sensitivity to space and colours, and creativity in order to design buildings for better living. Organisation chart

First Modular Integrated Construction residential project

As technology advances, the construction industry continues to upgrade with the times to make the building process faster and safer. Hong Kong’s first public works project adopting Modular Integrated Construction (MiC), is the Disciplined Services Quarters for the Fire Services Department at Pak Shing Kok, Tseung Kwan O. It is also the first residential project constructed with this innovative construction technology under the co-operation of the Architectural Services Department (ArchSD) and a contractor.Innovative construction methods bringing multiple benefitsInterior fitting out takes place after the completion of the building structural frame in conventional construction, which requires more workers and longer construction time, and generates more substantial construction wastage on sites. MiC, on the contrary, adopts the concept of “factory assembly followed by on-site installation”, where a building is divided into freestanding modules and the labour-intensive and time-consuming process can be accomplished in a factory before the modules are transported to the site for installation like piling up building blocks. In this manner, it not only minimises the duration of works on site, but also enhances productivity, site safety, environmental performance and cost-effectiveness. One may say that MiC brings multiple benefits.The project of the Disciplined Services Quarters for the Fire Services Department at Pak Shing Kok, Tseung Kwan O, comprises five quarters blocks, among which four have 16 storeys and one has 17 storeys. With 8 units on each floor, the quarters will provide 648 three-bedroom units of 50 square metres. The Director of Architectural Services, Mrs LAM YU Ka-wai, Sylvia, says the project commenced in August in 2019 and the construction process has been accelerated due to the adoption of MiC. The contractor expects the project to be completed by the end of 2020, earlier than the contractual completion date of the second quarter of 2021. Interior finishes and fittings completedThe development consists of about 3 800 modules commonly known as “boxes”. Each box has had most of its finishes, interior fittings, fixtures, etc, assembled ahead in the factory. According to Project Manager Ms AU Siu-man, Amy, of the ArchSD, more than 10 percent of the boxes have been installed at the construction site so far. Block Two, the tallest among the five blocks, has had four storeys installed. She says that the department consulted with the Water Supplies Department, the Electrical and Mechanical Services Department and the Fire Services Department regarding the project’s inspection and acceptance standards at the end of last year. Between June and July in 2019, a visit was conducted by the ArchSD and related departments to the contractor’s factory on the mainland to inspect the assembly of the boxes, and to ensure their safe transportation. The process of lifting a module and fitting it to a designated spot, taking only about 15 minutes to complete the entire process. Inside the unit , some essential fittings, partitions and fixtures (such as floor tiles, window grilles, a bathtub, a washbasin, kitchen cabinets and plumbing works) were already in place. Walls had also been painted or paved with tiles.Five days to assemble a storeyThe contractor’s Project Director, Mr NGAN Siu-tak, Emil, says that more than 80 percent of the interior fitting-out processes are completed in a prefabrication yard. The fitting of the modules to the building calls for precise calculations. It takes about five working days to assemble each floor, and 30 minutes to install a module. Lifting units to higher floors takes around five minutes longer. Setting an example for the construction industryIn recent years, the Government has proactively adopted MiC in various public works, with pilot projects including the InnoCell of the Hong Kong Science Park and the Wong Chuk Hang student hostel project of the University of Hong Kong. The second MiC project of the ArchSD, i.e. the Construction of a Multi-welfare Services Complex in Area 29 of Kwu Tung North New Development Area, will commence this month. It is hoped that by piloting the MiC technology in public projects, the Government can set an example for the construction industry and give practitioners greater confidence to use MiC in their projects. In the long run, it is hoped that through this construction technology, which is relatively new to Hong Kong, the industry will overcome severe challenges such as high costs and labour shortages they have been facing in recent years, and together we will promote the sustainable development of the construction sector. (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese) (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

SPONSORSHIP FOR INTERNATIONALDESIGN AWARDS 2020

SIDA (Sponsorship for International Design Awards 2020) No age-limit is imposed. Whether individuals or design companies are eligible to be subsidised for participating in any of the 24 specified International Competitions/Awards. Especially, we encourage young local design talent to apply. From entry fees to promotion fees of the competitions/awards, successful applicants can be reimbursed with “All Fee” as long as they are awarded in these specified international competitions/awards. Explore the international markets. Expand businesses. The “All Fee” can be up to HK$200,000 for each applying design unit. Apply now until 31 May 2021! Quotas are limited, “First-Come, First-Served”!

A different school design

A comfortable learning environment is crucial to the development of our students, and a people-oriented school design would create a pleasant atmosphere that encourages exploration and interaction among children on the campus. Here we will take you on a tour of the Po Leung Kuk Stanley Ho Sau Nan Primary School, another project undertaken by the Architectural Services Department (ArchSD) in the Kai Tak Development Area (KTDA), to learn more about the effort put into the project, from planning, design to completion. We will also see how architects have thought out of the box and worked hard to create an ideal campus for the students.Unlike the traditional school buildings, the Po Leung Kuk Stanley Ho Sau Nan Primary School adopts a low-rise 4-storey design, with the basketball court “innovatively” accommodated on the first floor in the middle of the school campus, thus creating a focal point that brings students, classrooms and outdoor spaces all together. In keeping with the concept of sustainable development of the KTDA, the campus has incorporated many green elements. For example, the facades are built with fair-faced concrete to reduce the need for extra finishing materials, and vertical greening is supported by timber and metal screen panels and sunshades to lessen the electricity burden for air-conditioning and create a natural and comfortable setting for the campus. Site-specific design approach      Integration into the communityAs the school is surrounded by residential blocks and highways nearby, the design team has adopted a site-specific design approach to make good use of the surrounding environment. There is a small square outside the school entrance that can be used as a waiting area for parents to pick up and drop off their children. In addition, the architects have used low fence walls instead of high walls to remove the sense of isolation of the campus from the outside. With a higher level of visual permeability, the school can integrate better into the community. Furthermore, in terms of layout, the school and its neighbouring SKH Holy Cross Primary School have been setback from the tall buildings across the road in order to create a sense of spaciousness, facilitate ventilation and help reduce the impact of road traffic noise. As the two schools are separated only by plants, this cleverly designed communal garden can serve to strengthen their connections.Ingenious layout      Connectivity between spatial areasThe Director of Architectural Services, Mrs LAM YU Ka-wai, Sylvia, pointed out that the design team had maintained close communication and interaction with the school when designing the campus in the hope of creating an ideal school environment together. I know that the campus has been built using the design concept of traditional walled villages. Colleagues told me that while a walled village has an ancestral hall and a study hall, the school has an assembly hall, a library and classrooms , all of which housed in three building blocks surrounding the ball court in the centre and linked up together using corridors, gardens and link bridges. The stairs lead to various spatial areas and connect the many functional spaces to one another. All these arrangements can shorten distances, encourage interaction and create an atmosphere of a small community within the school campus. Substantial greening      Building with heartThe greening ratio of the school reaches 30% with green terraces and roofs on various levels. On the day of our visit, several students told us that their favourite place in school is the library with its luxuriant lawn outside exuding an air of tranquility. The floor-to-ceiling glass panels at the entrance of the library are another distinctive feature, which, according to the design team, is intended to link up the indoor and outdoor spaces. This not only brings the natural landscape into the library for an enhanced sense of visual permeability and spaciousness, but also takes school activities outdoors for expanded learning spaces. Students can pick up a book and go outside to sit on the lawn, which makes their reading experience more pleasurable.Regarding construction materials, the school uses metal frames, timber screen panels and steel fences to create a variety of spatial areas with different levels of visual permeability. Large-sized floor-to-ceiling glass panels are used for classroom windows on all floors to let in more daylight and increase the sense of spaciousness. Green plants such as bamboo are specially planted outside some classroom windows not only to function as screens and provide shelter from the scorching sun, but also, according to the school principal, Ms KAM Yim-mui, to create a serene, relaxed and cultural environment on the campus to help cultivate students’ moral character. (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese)  (The video is provided by Development Bureau)