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Task force on “waste reduction at source” at reservoirs

Currently there are 17 impounding reservoirs in Hong Kong, in which a variety of living organisms such as algae, zooplankton, and fish can be found. These living organisms grow naturally in a state of ecological balance. However, the water quality of some of the reservoirs have been affected by an excessive growth of algae. Therefore, to ensure an ecological balance and to maintain good water quality, the Water Supplies Department (WSD) maintains a certain quantity of fish, which feed on algae, in such reservoirs by stocking fish fry into them regularly. Here we have invited colleagues from the WSD to tell us more about the “fish army” and the work of “reservoir fishermen” at the reservoirs.Fish army to prevent excessive growth of algaeWaterworks Chemist of the WSD, Mr TANG Ho-wai paid a site visit to Plover Cove Reservoir with colleagues recently. According to Mr TANG, the prolonged sunlight exposure and the relatively high level of nutrients in some of the reservoirs are favourable conditions for the growth of algae. For reservoirs that have experienced an excessive algae growth, the department regularly stocks fish fry, which feed on phytoplankton, into them. This method is particularly effective in regulating the growth of algae. The fish army in the reservoirs of Hong Kong is mainly made up of Silver Carp, Big Head, and Mud Carp.The Silver Carp is a filter feeder that mainly lives right below the water surface. With its fine gill rakers, the Silver Carp can filter and feed on small phytoplankton. The Big Head is an omnivorous fish that stays in the upper and middle layers of water, feeding on both phytoplankton and zooplankton. The Mud Carp mainly stays in the middle and bottom layers of water and feeds on organic detritus. Members of the fish army perform their functions at different water depths. As Silver Carp and Big Head are river fish which require a high flow of water to induce spawning and cannot reproduce in the still water of reservoirs, fish fry are regularly stocked into the reservoirs by the WSD. “Gill-netting” by reservoir fishermenMr TANG Ho-wai says to us that, to monitor the water quality and ecological environments of the reservoirs, the WSD regularly takes water samples from reservoirs for testing. In addition, gill-net surveys are conducted regularly to monitor the condition of fish to ensure an ecological balance in the reservoirs. According to Mr TANG Ho-wai, past monitoring records show that the water quality of the reservoirs in Hong Kong remains satisfactory.On the topic of “fishing”, we have to introduce two artisans (fishing), also known as “reservoir fishermen” – Mr KWOK Tai-hei and Mr YIP Chi-on, from the WSD. They leave for a reservoir every day early in the morning and spend almost the whole day working on a boat, with one steering the boat and the other casting a fishing net into the reservoir. Gill-netting is conducted at various monitoring points regularly to monitor the fish in the reservoirs. Basic information of fish, including the species and sizes, and their share of the population, is recorded. At the same time, they take water samples for testing at the laboratory to monitor water quality. Monitoring water quality in reservoirs in the front lineMr KWOK Tai-hei, who has been working at the reservoirs for 29 years, will retire in a few months. With extensive experience in the job, he shares that the water surface of the reservoirs may look calm, but actually it is no different from the sea under unstable weather conditions. In particular in the monsoon season when high winds come, white caps on wave top over reservoir water surface can also be seen. Furthermore, when casting a fishing net into a reservoir, one should be able to keep the net away from the intake points to prevent the net from being sucked in. Mr KWOK Tai-hei wants to pass on his work experience over the past years to his colleagues and remind them to pay attention to work safety at all times.Mr YIP Chi-on, who has been in the industry for six years, says that he enjoys “fishing” in the reservoirs. The duties of “reservoir fishermen” also include patrolling at the reservoirs and monitoring the situation inside the reservoirs. For example, if an excessive growth of algae is identified in a reservoir, they need to report to the department as soon as possible to enable timely handling and follow-up actions.The WSD always attaches great importance to the water quality in the reservoirs. Apart from using fish to control and prevent excessive growth of algae, the department will also explore new technology for enhanced monitoring of water quality, for example, exploring the deployment of unmanned surface vessels to conduct water sampling. The frontline crew is responsible of monitoring the sources of drinking water to ensure the quality of reservoir water and maintain the safety of drinking water in Hong Kong.   (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese) (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

Launching the Study Sponsorship Scheme to nurture arboriculture practitioners

With growing concerns over tree management and maintenance in the society, the Government has recognised the need to nurture more talents with related knowledge and skills. The Development Bureau (DEVB) announced that the Study Sponsorship Scheme (the Scheme) under the Urban Forestry Support Fund (the Fund) is open for application to encourage more youngsters to join the arboriculture and horticulture industry, so as to build up the industry's strength and capability to keep our urban forest healthy, thereby protecting public safety. Here we have invited a youngster who has applied for the study sponsorship to share with us his experience in undertaking an arboriculture programme. Meanwhile, a colleague of the Greening, Landscape and Tree Management Section (GLTMS) of the DEVB and a lecturer of an educational institute will talk to us about the details of the Scheme and the training of arboriculture practitioners.Providing sponsorships for the training of arborists and tree workersThe Fund, launched by the DEVB this year, offers training for people who aspire to join the arboriculture and horticulture industry, so as to uplift the professional standards of the practitioners as a whole and thus to ensure tree management quality. Earlier, the Scheme under the Fund was open for application to sponsor the training of youngsters to become arborists and tree workers. Under the Scheme, study sponsorship will be offered to applicants who undertake and complete recognised arboriculture, tree management and tree work programmes at Level 2 to Level 5 of the Qualifications Framework (QF) offered by local vocational, tertiary and training institutions.Full of opportunities in the arboriculture industryMr LEUNG Yat-fat enrolled in the Certificate in Integrated Tree Climbing course offered by the Tree Climbing Hong Kong and spent about three months to complete the course. Techniques such as tree climbing and how to work safely on trees were taught in the course. He says that safety is the top priority in arboriculture training. Before attempting to climb trees, students will first practise on a wooden structure made of iron pipes and bamboo sticks. Tree climbing is a relatively high-intensity physical activity and muscles of the whole body are involved. Sometimes students may feel as if they are having a heat stroke when climbing under the boiling sun. However, as long as one follows the steps and has a strong will, one can adapt gradually.Mr LEUNG Yat-fat believes that the arboriculture and horticulture industry is full of opportunities. After Typhoon Mangkhut in 2018, the Government has injected more resources to facilitate the sustainable development of the industry, which means there will be more job and promotion opportunities. Upon assessment, he has obtained a recognised qualification at QF Level 3. In order to enrich himself with more arboriculture skills, he has seized the opportunity offered by the Scheme to enrol in the course of Certificate in Petrol Chainsaw Use and Maintenance and Tree Trimming , and will apply for study sponsorship. Benefitting around 300 students per cohortMr TSANG Kwok-on, a Tree Management Officer of the GLTMS, DEVB, says there is a manpower shortage in the arboriculture and horticulture industry and the shortage of arborists and tree workers is more serious. The DEVB estimated that there were around 2 300 arboriculture practitioners in Hong Kong as at 2015 and the Scheme will benefit around 300 students per cohort to help nurture adequate and quality practitioners to support local tree management and maintenance work.Subsidies attracting enrolment of young peopleLecturer of the Department of Applied Science of the Hong Kong Institute of Vocational Education (Shatin), Mr HO Ka-chai, Chris, welcomes the Scheme provided by the DEVB, which will attract more youngsters to enrol in related courses and join the industry. Apart from offering programme in the Higher Diploma in Conservation and Tree Management, the institute also provides part-time programmes for practitioners, covering various aspects such as tree work supervision, tree climbing, chainsaw training, etc., and offering 20 to 80 places each year. He encourages youngsters who are interested in arboriculture and horticulture to enrol in these programmes. In particular, arboriculture work involves operations in different environments and is suitable for youngsters who like challenges, natural environment and outdoor activities. Trainee Programme to train arborists and tree climbersFurthermore, the Trainee Programme under the Fund was open for application from employers earlier (10 August), with a view to encouraging employers to engage arboriculture and tree management graduates and offer them on-the-job training to acquire working experience, paving the way for qualified arborists and tree climbers in the future. The programme is expected to benefit around 100 related graduates each year.The arboriculture and horticulture industry in Hong Kong is young and evolving, which offers youngsters good opportunities for self-enhancement and career development. With the Fund mentioned above, we will continue to promote the healthy and sustainable development of the industry and uplift the professional standards of the practitioners, thereby keeping our urban forest healthy and promoting a more liveable environment. (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese)  (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

A different school design

A comfortable learning environment is crucial to the development of our students, and a people-oriented school design would create a pleasant atmosphere that encourages exploration and interaction among children on the campus. Here we will take you on a tour of the Po Leung Kuk Stanley Ho Sau Nan Primary School, another project undertaken by the Architectural Services Department (ArchSD) in the Kai Tak Development Area (KTDA), to learn more about the effort put into the project, from planning, design to completion. We will also see how architects have thought out of the box and worked hard to create an ideal campus for the students.Unlike the traditional school buildings, the Po Leung Kuk Stanley Ho Sau Nan Primary School adopts a low-rise 4-storey design, with the basketball court “innovatively” accommodated on the first floor in the middle of the school campus, thus creating a focal point that brings students, classrooms and outdoor spaces all together. In keeping with the concept of sustainable development of the KTDA, the campus has incorporated many green elements. For example, the facades are built with fair-faced concrete to reduce the need for extra finishing materials, and vertical greening is supported by timber and metal screen panels and sunshades to lessen the electricity burden for air-conditioning and create a natural and comfortable setting for the campus. Site-specific design approach      Integration into the communityAs the school is surrounded by residential blocks and highways nearby, the design team has adopted a site-specific design approach to make good use of the surrounding environment. There is a small square outside the school entrance that can be used as a waiting area for parents to pick up and drop off their children. In addition, the architects have used low fence walls instead of high walls to remove the sense of isolation of the campus from the outside. With a higher level of visual permeability, the school can integrate better into the community. Furthermore, in terms of layout, the school and its neighbouring SKH Holy Cross Primary School have been setback from the tall buildings across the road in order to create a sense of spaciousness, facilitate ventilation and help reduce the impact of road traffic noise. As the two schools are separated only by plants, this cleverly designed communal garden can serve to strengthen their connections.Ingenious layout      Connectivity between spatial areasThe Director of Architectural Services, Mrs LAM YU Ka-wai, Sylvia, pointed out that the design team had maintained close communication and interaction with the school when designing the campus in the hope of creating an ideal school environment together. I know that the campus has been built using the design concept of traditional walled villages. Colleagues told me that while a walled village has an ancestral hall and a study hall, the school has an assembly hall, a library and classrooms , all of which housed in three building blocks surrounding the ball court in the centre and linked up together using corridors, gardens and link bridges. The stairs lead to various spatial areas and connect the many functional spaces to one another. All these arrangements can shorten distances, encourage interaction and create an atmosphere of a small community within the school campus. Substantial greening      Building with heartThe greening ratio of the school reaches 30% with green terraces and roofs on various levels. On the day of our visit, several students told us that their favourite place in school is the library with its luxuriant lawn outside exuding an air of tranquility. The floor-to-ceiling glass panels at the entrance of the library are another distinctive feature, which, according to the design team, is intended to link up the indoor and outdoor spaces. This not only brings the natural landscape into the library for an enhanced sense of visual permeability and spaciousness, but also takes school activities outdoors for expanded learning spaces. Students can pick up a book and go outside to sit on the lawn, which makes their reading experience more pleasurable.Regarding construction materials, the school uses metal frames, timber screen panels and steel fences to create a variety of spatial areas with different levels of visual permeability. Large-sized floor-to-ceiling glass panels are used for classroom windows on all floors to let in more daylight and increase the sense of spaciousness. Green plants such as bamboo are specially planted outside some classroom windows not only to function as screens and provide shelter from the scorching sun, but also, according to the school principal, Ms KAM Yim-mui, to create a serene, relaxed and cultural environment on the campus to help cultivate students’ moral character. (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese)  (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

“Mountain cutting and rock breaking” (rock blasting and breaking)

Colleagues from the Mines Division of the Geotechnical Engineering Office (GEO) of the Civil Engineering and Development Department (CEDD) will take us to Lam Tei Quarry in Tuen Mun, which is the only existing quarry operating in Hong Kong, to appreciate the quarry operation and the work of the Mines Division in supervising   the use of explosives for “mountain cutting and rock breaking” (rock blasting and breaking) in the quarry.Lam Tei Quarry was established in the 1960’s and has operated under contract since 1982.  The quarry is located about 3 km north of Tuen Mun New Town, covering an area of about 30 hectares.  According to the Senior Geotechnical Engineer of the Mines Division, Mr HUNG Kin-chung, Roy, the quarry has been operating for about 40 years, presently accounting for 5% of the total supply of rock products used in Hong Kong.  Operation of Lam Tei Quarry is scheduled for completion in 2023, when the site will be released for development use.Quarry not only to produce rock productsA quarry can produce about 70,000 tonnes of rock products each month. Following drilling and blasting of a rock mass, the blasted rock will be carried by trucks/conveyors from the blast location to rock crushers for crushing, screening and sorting into aggregates or other rock products in different sizes for construction uses, including production of concrete and asphalt.Aggregates are essential for the production of concrete and asphalt.  Integrating the production lines of concrete and asphalt with quarrying as a one-stop operation in a quarry can achieve a better efficiency in handling/moving of rock aggregates for   processing to the concrete or asphalt. It also saves time, lowers costs and reduces carbon emissions.  Besides, quarries can also help to receive the surplus rock generated from local construction projects and recycling it into useful aggregates and other rock products. From manual stone breaking to rock blastingQuarrying in old days was labour intensive. Workers would have to manually break up a large rock blocks, using hammers, chisels and steel wedges, into aggregates in different sizes for use, the process of which is called “stone breaking”.  At that time, limited considerations were given to the safety and health of workers, as well as the environmental impact of the quarry operations.  However, the situation has improved since the 1960s when the Government enacted new regulations to better control the use of explosives and the workplace safety in quarries.Stone breaking is no longer used in quarrying. Nowadays, “controlled blasting” will be used for rock extraction from a rock mass.  According to the Explosives Officer 1 of Mines Division, Mr TSE Wai-tong, the current blasting techniques have been well developed to make blasting safe and efficient.  Nevertheless, quarry operators are required to apply for and obtain approval from Mines Division for blasting to ensure that the blast design, arrangement and monitoring plan are in line with the safety and environmental standards prior to the proposed blast.Mr TSE Wai-tong also pointed out that no matter how big a blast is, its impact cannot be ignored and safety issues should never be discarded.   Protective measures such as blasting cages and vertical screens would have to be provided at the blast locations, with a view to protecting against flyrock (projected rock fragments) affecting workers and adjacent facilities.Mitigation of environmental impactsAccording to Senior Explosives Officer of the Mines Division, Mr LEUNG Pak-ming, before the cartridge explosives and detonators are placed in predrilled blast holes at the blast location, the Mines Division will deliver the required explosives from the Government Explosives Depots to the site at the contractor’s request. In order to minimise the environmental impacts of vibration, air overpressure and noise due to blasting, delayed firing at each blast hole can be carried out using detonators suitably arranged at different time delays.According to Mr LEUNG Pak-ming, blasting is required for rock excavation in many infrastructure projects involving site formation works, tunneling, etc. In order to facilitate  blasting by early morning, colleagues may have to start work in the early hours after midnight. Regarding the working environment, they may have to work underground (e.g. in deep excavations or tunnels) where the environment is hot and stuffy. The discomfort, particularly when carrying heavy equipment, is beyond description.Whether the Anderson Road Quarry, which has just accomplished its historical mission, or Lam Tei Quarry, being the only quarry still operating, many workers have taken part in the activities of “mountain cutting and rock breaking”. (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese)  (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

Government Job Opportunities for Non-Ethnic Chinese

(Please click here to watch the same video narrated in English) Assistant Primary School Mistress, Miss Amypreet Kaur, "I know that applicants for civil service posts at degree or professional level are required to attain specific results in the Common Recruitment Examination (CRE). At first, I was worried that my Chinese reading and writing abilities would not be sufficient for me to obtain the necessary result in the Use of Chinese paper. After two attempts, I successfully obtained “Level 2” result. I am glad that my efforts in preparing for the exam paid off." "Why don’t you give it a try like me and apply for a government job?" Please watch the video for more information about the Government measures to facilitate the employment of non-ethnic Chinese in the civil service. Official recruitment page

New Approach to Mitigate Traffic Noise at Public Housing Development Projects (Housing Department, Environmental Protection Department, Buildings Department)

"Hong Kong is a metropolitan with many people and vehicles. Traffic noise is unavoidable. Therefore, we began to think if we could make use of innovative technology to resolve the problem." Senior Project Officer, Environmental Protection Department, Yeung Kwok-leung, Maurice said."We improved the double-glazed window that was used in Hong Kong to come up with the design of this “Acoustic Window”. We made one of the “Acoustic Windows”, and conducted tests at laboratory for technical information. We also conducted researches and studies with colleagues from the Housing Department, and invited colleagues from the Buildings Department to participate in the designing of the window. Three departments collaborated in this project. Maurice said, "At least 20 developments of the Housing Departments will adopt the acoustic windows. Of course, some of the developments have been completed and are currently occupied. What made us happy was when residents said, "We don’t have to close the windows at all. It is very cool indoors and noise has been reduced. Thank you very much!” This compliment was so heart-warming." Hong Kong is a densely populated place. Busy city activities inevitably create noise, causing nuisance to the public, and traffic noise is often a major issue. In view of this, the Housing Department in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Department and Buildings Department has designed the acoustic windows and acoustic balconies installation in the public housing estates.In Shun Lai House of the Yau Lai Estate, some units are facing the portal of the Eastern Harbour Crossing with heavy traffic, and in the nearby area, there are also quarries and construction sites. The Housing Department installed acoustic windows in these units to reduce noise nuisance caused to the residents. Resident Mr. Law said, "I’ve left the acoustic windows open at night and I could hear the noisy traffic. It becomes very quiet when I closed the acoustic windows. I can sleep until dawn. I keep the acoustic windows open in the day time for good ventilation and to keep the place cool. It is environment-friendly as I don’t need to turn on the air conditioning often!" Mr Law, the resident, highly appreciates the design of the acoustic windows which reduces the traffic noise, and it is easy to take care of them. Mr Fung, who also lives in Shun Lai House, thinks that the design of the acoustic windows caters well for the needs of the residents. Another resident Mr. Fung said, "It provides an additional layer of glazing. When I hang my clothes outside, I just slide open the acoustic window. The windows on both sides can be pushed open like this."The design of the acoustic window looks simple, but it has come a long way from design, development through to implementation. It was a collaboration project of the Housing Department, Environmental Protection Department and Buildings Department. With the use of innovative technology, and based on the concept of “people-orientation” and “sustainable development”, we successfully implemented the acoustic window.Architect, Housing Department, Ngai Pui-yan, Jo said, "The Housing Department strives to optimise the use of our scarce land resources. In every project, we make sure that the land usage will deliver the best possible benefits. We aim to provide a good quality living environment for the residents based on the “people-oriented” design concept, and alleviating the impact of traffic noise in building design is one of our key goals. For years, building design in Hong Kong has evolved to deal with the traffic noise impact. In 2009, the Housing Department, Environmental Protection Department and Buildings Department collaborated to develop various measures on mitigating the traffic noise impact.Yeung Kwok-leung, Maurice said, "We came up with this simple design of a quasi double-glazed window, which has an alley between the two layers of glasses. Then we made use of the principle of sound absorption, diffraction and reflection to achieve the noise reduction effect. Based on this concept, we carried out simulations in the laboratory and obtained positive results. We then shared our findings with colleagues of the Housing Department. They agreed that it could be put to practical application."Building Surveyor, Buildings Department, Cheng Kam-ming, Anson added, "Traditionally, noise reduction and natural ventilation belong to two different and contradictory categories. Usually noise reduction is achieved at the expense of natural ventilation, and vice versa, good natural ventilation may compromise the noise reduction effect. We hope to devise a standard compliant acoustic window design, which meets the statutory requirements for natural ventilation, achieving noise reduction effect, and has wider applications as well."As soon as it was confirmed that the acoustic windows could be adopted to mitigate the traffic noise impact, the three departments worked together in the areas of design, exploring the choice of materials, ascertaining statutory requirements and users’ needs, etc. Our work included continuous testing in various aspects and data collection, modification and fine-tuning of the design. The idea of acoustic window was gradually turned into a reality. Ngai Pui-yan, Jo said, "We set up an actual size mock-up flat using the acoustic windows in San Po Kong, and conducted tests in comparison with the actual flat using conventional window design to verify that the acoustic window could reduce the traffic noise impact effectively, and at the same time maintain natural air ventilation and natural lighting, as well as other factors that we needed to take into consideration." Through collaborations and concerted efforts of departments, the acoustic windows were finally adopted in King Tai Court, which has its first occupants in 2017. As it is situated at a location impacted by heavy traffic, it was the first public housing estate fully installed with the acoustic windows. In 2018, the acoustic windows were formally introduced into the modular flat design of public housing estates. Yeung Kwok-leung, Maurice said, "We have a range of measures for different housing estates and for units of different sitting direction. For example, we can install sound absorption material to enhance the noise reduction effect. Overall speaking, having conducted testings and on-site verifications, we find that the acoustic window can reduce noise as high as 8 decibels. In general, if traffic flow is reduced by half, noise is reduced by 3 decibels. So it produces very satisfactory results." The design concept of acoustic window jointly developed by the Housing Department,  Environmental Protection Department and Buildings Department can also be deployed to construct “Acoustic Balconies”. The combined effort of the three departments in the  development of “acoustic windows”and “acoustic balconies” showcases an exemplary cross-departmental innovative collaboration. The Housing Department will continue to use the design concept of acoustic windows and acoustic balconies to optimise land resources and increase flat production. (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

Landslide Emergency Services and Slope Maintenance Teams (Civil Engineering and Development Department)

"My grandpa and uncle are engineers. As a kid, they nurtured my interest in this area. Back then, whenever I saw tunnels, I found them so remarkable. I was always wondering why a tunnel would not collapse." Geotechnical Engineer, Civil Engineering and Development Department, Fung Ka-wing told us."Hong Kong has lots of mountains and little flat land, and the population density is high. Every year, the Geotechnical Engineering Office receives about 300 reports on landslides." "Once, I arrived at a landslide site and I received a message at the same time that Super Typhoon Mangkhut would approach Hong Kong soon. I urged the villagers to move out temporarily as it was very dangerous. At first, the villagers did not listen to my recommendation. But I explained the situation to them patiently. Finally, they accepted it."He said, "Our top priority is to ensure the safety of the general public. We believe that they can feel it too." Hong Kong has a land area of about 1,100 km2. Around 60% of the land area consists of relatively steep natural terrain. During the rainy season, landslides occur frequently, with an average of 300 reported landslides in Hong Kong each year.The Geotechnical Engineering Office (GEO) of the Civil Engineering and Development Department (CEDD) has a slope safety management system in place to protect the general public from landslide hazards.When the Hong Kong Observatory issues a Landslide Warning or typhoon signal no. 8 or above, the Emergency Control Centre of the Geotechnical Engineering Office will be in operation.Over ten geotechnical engineers and technical officers will be on duty to provide geotechnical advice to government departments on handling landslide emergencies.Upon receiving landslide reports, geotechnical engineers will carry out site inspections and give advice to government departments to restore services and facilities disrupted by landslides.Geotechnical Engineer, Civil Engineering and Development Department, Ting Sui-man said, "Our top priority is to ensure the safety of the general public. If rescue work is required, we will collaborate with the Fire Services Department and provide advice to the Police on the areas to be cordoned off. We will also contact responsible works departments to carry out emergency slope works. It includes promptly covering the slopes with tarpaulin to prevent rainwater infiltration which may cause further landslides."When more serious landslides occur, the work of the geotechnical engineers will be even more hectic. In the evening of 29 August 2018, a massive landslide hit a road section of Fan Kam Road near Ta Shek Wu Tsuen. Both lanes of Fan Kam Road were closed due to inundation of debris and muddy water on the road.Geotechnical Engineer, Civil Engineering and Development Department, Fung Ka-wing said, "When I arrived at the site, the landslide debris from the hillside covered the entire road. The debris was up to knee level. I urged the villagers to move out temporarily."Resident, Angelina Yeung said, "I heard a “boom” and all of a sudden the debris rushed to near my house, and a van was bumped in. The Geotechnical Engineering Office used concrete blocks to build a barrier around the slope, covered the slope surface with tarpaulin and shotcrete the landslide scar."Angelina Yeung continued, "A lot of elderly people live here. They (CEDD) did a lot of works, some beyond their scope. They have been really helpful. And we are so grateful to them."The day after the landslide, staff of the Geotechnical Engineering Office and Survey Division visited the site again.They used drones and handheld laser scanners to quickly conduct landslide risk assessment. Detailed geographical data of the nearby natural terrain were collected, providing useful information for the design of emergency works.Geotechnical Engineer, Civil Engineering and Development Department, Choi Wai-kwok, Michael explained, "The data collected on site, i.e. the three-dimensional image, enabled our engineers to carry out landslide hazard study and to assess whether there is any immediate or long term landslide risk. Based on the estimated size and volume of potential further landslides, suitable engineering works would be carried out accordingly, such as the installation of soil nails and flexible barrier to protect Fan Kam Road at slope toe."Fan Kam Road is the main road connecting Fanling and Kam Tin. The landslide took place just before the school re-opening in September. To restore the road service as quickly as possible and to minimise disruption to the residents, the Geotechnical Engineering Office worked closely with the Highways Department. Immediate action was taken to mobilise the contractors to carry out emergency repair work at the critical location.Geotechnical Engineer, Civil Engineering and Development Department, Lo Ho-pong said, "Most of the landslide debris was accumulated at the mid-level of the hillside, posing subsequent landslide danger. The biggest challenge was how to deal with these debris. Our target was to re-open at least one lane of the road to cope with the traffic on the first day of school."He continued, "We discussed with our contractors and engineers on how to optimise the design to ensure that the construction works could be completed by 10 p.m. that night."Immediately after completion of Stage 1 emergency works, Stage 2 works was also successfully completed within the next two weeks. All these emergency works were essential for  preventing more severe landslides from happening when Super Typhoon Mangkhut hit Hong Kong.Actually, there are some other works of the Geotechnical Engineering Office that are closely related to the daily life of the general public.Geotechnical Engineer, Civil Engineering and Development Department, Chu Kei-hong said, "CEDD operates 90 raingauges in Hong Kong, which account for the majority amongst all government departments. The rainfall data collected by these raingauges enable us to have a clear picture of the rainfall condition of Hong Kong. This facilitates our joint decision with the Hong Kong Observatory on the issue or cancellation of a Landslide Warning."Chief Geotechnical Engineer, Civil Engineering and Development Department, Yeung Fei, Jenny said, "We are now facing the challenge of extreme rainfall events caused by global warming. We must stay alert, and cannot slack off. We will keep striving our best to serve the public, and to protect their lives and properties from the threats of landslides." (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

Air Navigation Service Provider Teams (Civil Aviation Department)

Senior Safety & Quality Officer, Civil Aviation Department, Wong Shan-ngar, Sarah said, "The Civil Aviation Department will not be complacent. Instead, we always examine the situation and plan ahead.""Before the typhoon warning signal no. 8 was issued, our Air Traffic Management Division coordinated with the Air Traffic Engineering Services Division in manpower deployment. We gathered some 100 frontline staff to stand ready for the upcoming challenge. Our colleagues in the aviation industry put safety as our top priority, then we pool all our energy to resume operation."Sarah continued, "As a member of the team, my mission is to ensure the safety of aircraft in the sky. I am very proud to be part of this team." The Hong Kong International Airport is one of the busiest airports in the world. Besides handling the huge volume of flights every day to ensure aviation safety, the Civil Aviation Department (CAD) has to gear up for unexpected challenges.The CAD handles over 2,100 flight movements every day. Its service covers not only the Hong Kong International Airport but also the entire Hong Kong Flight Information Region.Sarah said, "The Hong Kong Flight Information Region spans the South China Sea, covering an area of 276,000 km2, which is approximately equivalent to 250 times the size of Hong Kong."To cope with the ever-increasing demand, the CAD commissioned its Air Traffic Management System in end 2016. The new System increased the capacity for flight plan processing by five times, enabling the real-time monitoring of 1,500 air or ground targets as well as simultaneous reception and integration of information gathered from different channels.She explained that the new Air Traffic Management System integrates weather image, which could be associated with the presence of gusty wind, heavy rains and even lightning, into the radar display monitor. Air traffic controllers are able to proactively plan for a flight route to avoid the adverse weather zone. She said, "Our colleagues find the new Air Traffic Management System very user-friendly as they can get all the information instantly in one integrated system without having to check from different sources. Most importantly, it helps enhance our air traffic control operation and working efficiency." Scientific Officer, Hong Kong Observatory, Kok Mang-hin said, "In our collaboration with the CAD, we are impressed by the professionalism of CAD colleagues who strive to continuously upgrade their service quality in coping with adverse weather to ensure aviation safety. Knowing that the CAD has access to advanced weather information to facilitate their operation, as a citizen, I feel a lot more secure when taking a flight back to Hong Kong."To ensure instant access to accurate information, facilities which support air traffic management including radars, navigational aids and other communication equipment are installed at different locations of Hong Kong. The radar station at Mount Parker in Quarry Bay is one of the CAD’s 13 outstations managed by the Air Traffic Engineering Services Division.Senior Electronics Engineer, Civil Aviation Department, Tsao Chi-wai, Felix said, "Our radar signals provide important information to our Air Traffic Control Officers. Therefore, we have to be meticulous in examining every piece of wire and signal to ensure that information can be clearly conveyed via the devices to facilitate our Air Traffic Control Officers in making crucial judgements." In September 2018, Super Typhoon Mangkhut struck Hong Kong. A week before the approach of the typhoon, CAD deployed technical staff to inspect the 13 outstations. On the other hand, CAD discussed with airlines and the Airport Authority Hong Kong to divert all aircraft from the airport before the typhoon struck, resulting in an empty apron at the Hong Kong International Airport.Sarah said, "It did not mean that we were not engaged in any work even though there were no aircraft, as we still had to provide service to aircraft overflying Hong Kong. Before the typhoon signal no. 8 was issued, our Air Traffic Management Division coordinated with the Air Traffic Engineering Services Division in manpower deployment. We gathered some 100 frontline staff to stand ready for the upcoming challenge."As Mangkhut gradually moved away from Hong Kong, our Air Traffic Management Division colleagues made use of the integrated forecast system to estimate the operating condition after service resumption. They then informed the Airport Authority Hong Kong and airlines to resume the takeoff and landing of flights. Meanwhile, the Air Traffic Engineering Services Division sent staff to the outstations to carry out inspection and perform necessary maintenance work.Tsao Chi-wai, Felix said, "Mangkhut left behind a trail of severe destruction, landslides and collapsed trees. Our colleagues had to walk all the way up the hills, carrying with them heavy instruments and spare parts for maintenance work. They overcame the difficulties and successfully completed the job."Air traffic was resumed after the typhoon warning signal was cancelled. With flight number running from 0 to 1,280, everything was back to normal within one and half day. The CAD accomplished an almost impossible mission.Sarah said, "Whenever there is a typhoon, our colleagues in the aviation industry always put safety as our top priority, then we pool all our energy to resume operation. The professionalism touches me greatly. I am confident that the air traffic management of Hong Kong is in capable hands and I am very proud to be part of this team."Tsao Chi-wai, Felix said, "As civil servants, whenever we encounter difficulties, we must come forward with courage to solve the problems. In all circumstances, we will strive to do our best to serve the public." (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

“Repair Our Own Trails” (Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department)

"It is hoped that through the Trail Maintenance Workshops, the public would have a better understanding about our trail maintenance and management work." Country Parks Officer, Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department, Yeung Fai-fai, Felix said.He added, "Have you ever imagined after the workshop, the attendees were all sweated, then they began to cherish our nature and would help to promote positive messages? This brought an explosive effect. The greatest satisfaction was being able to connect a group of people. We interacted with each other through the activity and trust was built up. This was very motivating indeed." Hong Kong abounds with beautiful country parks. The full array of hiking trails of about 500 km in total provides public trail users with convenient access to the countryside to enjoy the pleasure of outing.As the hiking trails are exposed to rainfall erosion over the years, coupled with the growing popularity of hiking and trail running activities in recent years, there is a rising need for trail repair and maintenance work. The Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department (AFCD), which is responsible for the construction, management and maintenance of the hiking trails, has been facing a big challenge.The Department has come up with a win-win solution which allows colleagues to pass down their skills and knowledge, and at the same time promotes public education in protecting and maintaining the hiking trails for their own use.AFCD generally adopts a “Leave No Trace” principle in the construction and maintenance works of hiking trails. Frontline staff use simple methods to construct the hiking trails according to the terrain, and make use of the on-site natural materials for maintenance works as far as possible.Yeung Fai-fai, Felix said, "In 2016, a local community group, the “Concern Group on Concretisation of Hong Kong Natural Trails”, raised concerns and debate over the Government’s use of concrete in building walkways in the countryside."He continued, "In the light of the public concern, AFCD organised activities to communicate with the relevant organisations. We also organised some trail maintenance workshops, hoping that the public and volunteers, through participating in the workshops, would better understand our work in hiking trails management and maintenance." The scheme has evolved from knowledge sharing communication, and public forums, to educating the public on the concepts of trail maintenance. Volunteers are also invitedto participate in the on-site construction and repair works. These activities enabled the public to understand the cause of soil erosion on the hiking trails, and to learn the maintenance method.The Country Parks Trail Maintenance Team of AFCD mobilised around 500 volunteers to participate in the trail maintenance workshops. Under the supervision of AFCD’s technicians, the volunteers rolled up their sleeves to repair the hiking trails. They assisted AFCD to continuously improve the trail facilities and to promote the spirit of “Repair Our Own Trails”.Volunteer Ngan Chung-man said, "I joined the Trailwalker previously, and when I was walking on the trails, I was not aware that they needed to be maintained. Like many Hong Kong people, I used to take things for granted. I realised afterwards that it was the effort of a team of people working on trail maintenance, which allowed us to enjoy the beautiful hiking trails."Senior Field Officer, Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department, Chan Ka-lai, Carrie said, "The volunteers showed much appreciation for our effort after seeing the hard work we put in. Some of them told us, after helping in the maintenance work, that they are willing to jointly protect and conserve the hiking trails and will use them with care. I also note that there are lots of passionate trail users in Hong Kong. No matter how tired they are, they are willing to help repair the hiking trails on weekend holidays. We are truly touched by them."Through public engagement, the scheme enabled the trail users to experience trail maintenance work, and made them understand the importance of trail conservation. In the long run, the scheme aims at nurturing more volunteers to take part in the sustainable conservation work of hiking trails.Senior Field Assistant, Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department, Lee Ma-fat said, "The volunteers treasure the hiking trails very much, so they instantly grasped what we taught them. There is a very large group of volunteers and they are highly motivated. We have the skills to carry out the construction and maintenance work, yet the biggest challenge lies in the transportation of materials, because that requires a lot of physical energy and manpower. At the moment, we have sufficient manpower drawn from a large pool of volunteers, and they are doing areally great job."Volunteer Siu Hing wo said, "Everytime I work as a volunteer, I have some reflections on nature. What is the relationship between human beings and nature? Are we the destroyer, the manager, or the protector of nature?"Yeung Fai-fai, Felix said, "When we communicate with the volunteers, we find that they are getting to understand our work better and recognise the value of our work. This has established a foundation of the trust between us and the volunteers. We anticipate to train more volunteers, and to build up a workforce in the long run, so as to work together to manage the hiking trails and conserve our natural resources."The scheme has been running for three years, and maintenance work involving 550m of trails was completed. The Green Earth, a local environmental organisation, hasapplied for funding from the Environment and Conservation Fund. Besides, some environmental organisations and uniformed groups, which also agree with the purpose of the scheme, are exploring ways for long term collaboration with AFCD. (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

Pressing ahead with the implementation of the New Territories Cycle Track Network

City dwellers have become more aware of healthy living. Cycling, which integrates exercise and recreation, is most suitable for the whole family to participate in. The Government has been committed to developing a comprehensive cycle track network in the New Territories (NT) to provide a cycle track connecting the east and west of the NT for leisure and recreation purposes in order to improve people’s quality of living. Here the colleagues of the Civil Engineering and Development Department (CEDD) will introduce this new cycle track with a total length of about 82 kilometres (km) upon completion and share its design concept and characteristics.A cycle track running through the east and west of the NTIn recent years, the Government has been striving to implement the NT Cycle Track Network project, which will link up the individual cycle track sections currently scattered in the NT to provide a continuous east-west cycle track in the NT by improving the existing cycle tracks and constructing new ones. Senior Engineer of the CEDD, Mr CHU Wai-lun, Thomas, says the comprehensive NT Cycle Track Network broadly comprises two backbone sections: the one from Tuen Mun to Ma On Shan is about 60 km long (starting from Tuen Mun in the west and reaching Ma On Shan in the east via Yuen Long, Sheung Shui, Fanling, Tai Po and Sha Tin), and the other from Tsuen Wan to Tuen Mun is about 22 km long (to be built along the seafront between Tsuen Wan and Tuen Mun). Yuen Long – Sheung Shui section completedAt present, the sections from Tuen Mun to Yuen Long and from Sheung Shui to Ma On Shan have been completed and are open to the public. Regarding the cycle track section that connects the two sections, i.e. the track section that runs from Yuen Long to Sheung Shui, the part along Yau Pok Road in Yuen Long was opened to the public. The remaining parts have been opened and the entire 60 km-long backbone section between Tuen Mun and Ma On Shan is completed. Based on the cycling speed of the general public, it will take about six hours to complete the entire route. And that will satisfy the leisure needs of the enthusiastic riders.Meanwhile, the CEDD has been taking forward the implementation of the backbone section of the cycle track between Tsuen Wan and Tuen Mun. According to Mr Thomas CHU, the section between Tsing Tsuen Bridge and Bayview Garden in Tsuen Wan is expected to be completed and open to the public early next year.Beautiful scenery along the cycle track alignmentEngineer of the CEDD, Mr CHIU Chi-ho, Derek, introduces the characteristics of the newly opened cycle track section running along Yau Pok Road to Pok Wai South Road in Yuen Long. He says that in the selection of the alignment of the route, priority was given to spots with beautiful scenery and cultural elements, such as Kam Tin River in Yuen Long and Tai Fu Tai in San Tin, to enhance the appeal of the track. At the same time, the project team had considered the impacts of the cycle track alignment on the residents, environment and ecology in the vicinity, so as to optimise its design to avoid affecting some conservation areas, bird habitats, etc. Safety and environment beautification taken into design considerationAccording to Mr Derek CHIU, the Government attaches great importance to safe cycling. In the design of the cycle track, the project team has considered its width, gradient and curvature, and provided proper traffic signs, road markings and guard rails at suitable locations to protect the safety of cyclists and other road users. Furthermore, wherever technically feasible, cycle bridges and cycle subways are provided to minimise the need for cyclists to get off their bicycles to cross the roads.It is equally important to beautify the environment. The project team has specifically arranged the planting of flowers that blossom all year round alongside the cycle track. Apart from preserving as far as possible the existing trees next to the cycle track, hundreds of new trees and tens of thousands of shrubs have been planted to create a green environment in the community. The railings along the cycle track have been specially painted with patterns of rolling hills to blend in harmoniously with the natural surroundings.Additional ancillary facilities to provide a comfortable environmentTo create a comfortable cycling environment, Mr Derek CHIU says that the department has also provided ancillary facilities for the cyclists, such as resting stations with bicycle parking spaces to allow cyclists to take a rest or visit nearby attractions before continuing their journey. Cycling entry/exit hubs are also provided in the vicinity of MTR stations such as Sheung Shui Station and University Station for cyclists to gather or disband. The hubs provide facilities such as bicycle rental kiosks, bicycle parking spaces, first aid stations, refreshment kiosks and toilets. (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese) (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

The most popular exhibition: "Eternal Life – Exploring Ancient Egypt" (Leisure and Cultural Services Department)

Museum Director (Science Museum), Leisure and Cultural Services Department, CHAN Shuk-man, Paulina said, "The Hong Kong Science Museum explores around the world every year for spectacular exhibitions to bring to the citizens of Hong Kong.""We encountered many difficulties, such as the regulation of temperature and humidity. Throughout the exhibition venue, we had to maintain a consistent temperature and humidity. We realised that there was not enough space at our Special Exhibition Hall. Therefore, we removed some exhibits from our Exhibition Hall temporarily so as to extend the exhibition space. The government has years of experience and established procedures in hosting exhibitions. But how do we give a facelift and bring a whole new experience to the public? We have to introduce new elements with our innovative spirit."CHAN Shuk-man, Paulina added, "We must have the vision and passion to bring high quality cultural events and exhibitions to the citizens of Hong Kong." The project, the exhibition on "Eternal Life – Exploring Ancient Egypt",  was primarily managed by Paulina and the Curatorial officers of the Science Museum.  The exhibition is so far the most popular exhibition of the Leisure and Cultural Services Department, attracting over 0.85 million visitors. Let’s see how they went the extra mile in using innovation to create the “world-class” exhibition.Exhibitions on Egyptian mummies are mostly presented from historical and archaeological perspectives. The Hong Kong Science Museum and The British Museum jointly organised the exhibition on “Eternal Life – Exploring Ancient Egypt” in 2017, using a scientific approach to unveil the myth about the eternal life of the ancient mummies.Paulina said, "Throughout the year, the Hong Kong Science Museum constantly looks out for spectacular exhibition items from around the world to present them to the enjoyment of Hong Kong people. A few years ago, we learnt that The British Museum had done some novel research on the mummies ofancient Egypt. On knowing that we were going to organise this exhibition, we realised that cultural relics was the key to understand the historical background of the exhibits. Then we brainstormed ideas and used innovative thinking to explore ways to make this exhibition a whole new experience for the public."During the exhibition, the exterior setting of the Science Museum was a replicate of an ancient Egyptian shrine.The then Designer I (Science), WONG Yin-yiu, Angela said, "Due to the original design of the Science Museum, we could not turn it into a pyramid. We conducted lots of research and found that shrine was of great importance in ancient Egypt. We hoped to create for the audience an ambience of making a pilgrimage when they visited the Science Museum."Paulina added, "We encountered quite a lot of difficulties. The British Museum is a world class museum. They have a very high standard for handling the cultural relics. They set stringent requirements in many aspects, such as the ambience temperature, humidity control, lighting arrangement at the venue, and even the air-tightness of the display cases."Technical Officer I (Science) Mechanical Engineering, CHAN Kim-fung said, "We all know how rarely in Hong Kong we have a relative humidity below 40%. We adopted a lot of measures. Our museum is not built for storing cultural relics, and our air conditioning system is a bit old without humidity control function. Therefore, we had to add a fresh air regulating function in our air conditioning system, to help control the humidity level of the exhibition halls." From venue setup, lighting design to the display of textual explanation, we hoped to bring to visitors an entirely new experience. For example, this multimedia programme, crafted by animations and 3D mapping technology, was the first of its kind among similar exhibitions worldwide.In addition to the original exhibits and textual explanations, to facilitate better understanding of the structure of the mummies from a scientific perspective, the Science Museum borrowed from a supplier a medical CT Scan. They used it to illustrate from a scientific perspective how archaeologists and other specialists applied non-intrusive method to determine the age and sex of the mummified bodies. Other themes, such as diet, health conditions, mummification process and religious customs of the ancient Egyptians were included.Curator (Science), CHUNG Chun-wah, Kelvin said, "In conjuring up this event, we wanted to introduce new elements. Then we came up with the idea of the “Escape Room”, which was something we never did before, and it was quite well received. The content of the “Escape Room”revolved around the information shown in the exhibition. We hoped that the visitors could make use of the information as clues to solve the puzzles, and then escape from the room."Paulina said, "The British Museum is a world class museum. We were contemplating how we could craft an exhibition suitable for Hong Kong people. We have put a lot of thoughts in designing the event, apart from the treatment of the cultural relics. I believe that colleagues in the museum need to have a vision and a passion for bringing high quality cultural activities and exhibitions to the people of Hong Kong." (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

Promoting the Development and Application of Renewable Energy (Drainage Services Department)

"As an experienced propellant of renewable energy projects in the Drainage Services Department, I constantly ponder ways to introduce breakthrough improvements in this area for the department and our community." Drainage Services Department Senior Project Manager, Li Chung-leung, Ricky said."I often encourage my colleagues to proactively voice out effective and innovative methods and ideas, enabling the department to continuously enhance the renewable energy focused quality service culture. Inculcating the mindset of “You Can Do It”, we strive to overcome the challenges encountered during the application of new technologies and the operation of renewable energy facilities."Ricky said, "I encourage them to try boldly and verify carefully, inspire and lead colleagues to pay extra effort and exert team spirit to resolve problems." Today, the harbour in Hong Kong is so beautiful that citizens can enjoy swimming and experience the excellent water quality. This is the result of Drainage Services Department’s (DSD) years of hard work.In addition to sewage treatment and flood prevention, DSD has been actively developing and promoting the application of renewable energy in recent years, contributing to the sustainable development in Hong Kong.Rapid population growth coupled with the dramatic increase in economic activities have inevitably generated a large amount of sewage. DSD collects up to 2.8 million m3 of sewage every day, enough to fill up 1,120 standard size swimming pools. The collected sewage is then conveyed to sewage treatment works for treatment. The conveyance and treatment processes consume substantial amount of energy.The four major secondary sewage treatment works in DSD have been employing the latest technology to utilise the biogas produced during the sludge treatment process to generate electricity and heat for use within the sewage treatment works. To maximise the use of renewable energy, DSD sent staff on study visits to the United States, Germany, and other regions to learn from their experience and to explore effective ways of developing renewable energy in Hong Kong.Ricky said, "Apart from getting our job done, we are constantly exploring ways to bring greater benefits to the environment. Taking the Tai Po Sewage Treatment Works as an example, we need to pay over a million dollars for electricity every month. Could it be self-sustainable in energy?" Riding on the production of biogas during the sludge treatment process, DSD, in the spirit of “Daring to Try, Practising with Care”, actively explores ways to increase the production of biogas. Finally, in 2016, DSD and the Environmental Protection Department (EPD) jointly developed the “Food Waste and Sewage Sludge Anaerobic Co-digestion” Trial Scheme. As the Scheme was new to Hong Kong, the departments encountered many challenges during implementation. Electrical & Mechanical Engineer, Drainage Services Department, Cheung Kin-kuen said, "Westerners’ diets are mostly meat-based, therefore, protein is the main component of their food waste, whereas in Hong Kong, the composition of food waste is mainly carbohydrates. To ensure the viability of this technology in Hong Kong, we commissioned a local university to conduct DNA test for micro-organisms to confirm that the technology is feasible to be applied in Hong Kong. It is estimated that EPD will provide the Tai Po Sewage Treatment Works of DSD with a maximum of 50 tonnes food waste per day. The pre-treated food waste will undergo anaerobic co-digestion with the sewage sludge in the sewage treatment works. The Scheme utilises existing facilities of DSD, to harness the synergy effect in generating 30% more biogas and at the same time reducing the amount of digestate by 30%. The Scheme not only helps alleviate the burden on landfills, but also supplies a million kilowatt-hours of electricity to the sewage treatment works annually, which helps save around a million dollars in electricity cost annually. In addition, DSD capitalises on its own advantages by installing photovoltaic panels at different sewage treatment works and pumping stations. Siu Ho Wan Sewage Treatment Works is equipped with over 4,200 photovoltaic panels with an installed generation capacity of 1.1 megawatt. When it came into operation in late 2016, it was the largest of its kind in Hong Kong. DSD also set up a Renewable Energy Information Centre there. Guided tours are provided with the aim of enhancing public awareness of the government’s effort in the development and application of renewable energy. To promote wider use of solar energy, DSD is exploring the feasibility of installing hotovoltaic panels on the covers of the sedimentation tanks at the Stonecutters Island Sewage Treatment Works, which is the largest of its type in Hong Kong. However, the curvy surface of the sedimentation tank covers makes it difficult to install traditional photovoltaic panels.The then Senior Electrical & Mechanical Engineer, Drainage Services Department, Wong Ying-ying, Regina added, "There are thin film photovoltaic panels available in the market. We installed them on the sedimentation tank Number 9 as a trial. Although we encountered different technical problems in the process, we are confident that by enhancing the design, more photovoltaic panels could be installed on the covers of sedimentation tanks." The then Deputy Director of Drainage Services, Drainage Services Department, Mak Ka-wai, JP said, "The mission of DSD is to provide the public with world-class sewage treatment and drainage services. With a “Do it from the Heart” attitude, we strive to develop renewable energy. On average, we produce around 27 million kilowatt-hours of electricity a year, which is equivalent to 9% of our overall electricity consumption. According to statistics, Hong Kong’s potential in developing renewable energy is about 3 to 4% of the total electricity consumed. Although we have already far exceeded this figure, DSD will keep the momentum going. We hope that by around 2030, we could successfully turn the Tai Po Sewage Treatment Works into a “zero emission” facility, achieving the goal of “waste-to-energy”. I believe that with the concerted efforts of our staff, we will be able to achieve it." (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

Staff are reporting for duty to the new short-term positions

Under the Job Creation Scheme with its purview in connection with the Government’s Anti-epidemic Fund (AEF), a young beneficiary under the Scheme, currently working as an assistant engineer for a contractor engaged by the Drainage Services Department (DSD), will share with us her experience in job hunting and her involvement in the public works project.The Government continuing to create jobs and recruit staffTo relieve the worsening unemployment situation due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Government has set aside $6 billion under the AEF to create about 30 000 time-limited jobs in the public and private sectors in the coming two years. According to the SCS, Mr Patrick NIP, the Government has planned to provide 21 700 jobs, of which 13 700 will be created in different government departments. So far, 2 500 new colleagues have reported for duty. He says that in view of the pandemic, the Government will continue to create jobs and recruit staff. In order to stabilise the economy and create time-limited jobs, it is most important that we stand united, make concerted efforts and do our parts to win the fight against the pandemic as soon as possible.Promoting the creation of new short-term positions in private sectorThe DEVB and departments under its purview have created a total of more than 6 500 time-limited jobs, including government positions and those created through procurement of services from consultants or contractors under existing or new contractual arrangements. Miss LEUNG Wing-yiu, Yoyo, started to work as an assistant engineer for a works contractor in the end of May. Hers is a short-term position created in the non-government sector. She last worked for an airport development project but had to find a new job as the project was about to complete. She could not help worrying because many enterprises were laying off employees or cutting back on recruitment amid the pandemic. She feels very lucky and happy now that she can continue to work as an engineer, a job that she likes. Accumulating experience to enhance competitivenessMiss Yoyo LEUNG says that the contractor that has hired her is participating in the DSD’s expansion of Sha Tau Kok Sewage Treatment Works project, giving her an opportunity to learn about the operation and construction procedures of sewage works, such as how the Building Information Modelling technology can be used to enhance the accuracy of project planning, and the DSD’s work in flood prevention which comprises the innovative adoption of the Blue-Green Infrastructure (a modern stormwater management concept) to uplift Hong Kong’s flood resilience. These can help increase her knowledge in drainage infrastructure, which can in turn strengthen her competitiveness in the job market.Encouraging new colleagues to accept new challengesProject Manager of the contractor, Mr FAN Chun-wai, Raymond, welcomes Miss Yoyo LEUNG to their work team as she not only shares various tasks, but is also careful and meticulous especially in reading documents. Mr Raymond FAN hopes that she will embrace this job opportunity to take up new challenges and learn the process from design to construction. He believes the work experience thus gained will benefit her career development. Besides, the contractor has hired several frontline colleagues and workers under the Job Creation Scheme of the AEF, thereby providing job opportunities amid the current difficult economic conditions. Facilitating expansion of sewage treatment worksDSD’s Engineer, Mr LEUNG Ka-kay says the Department is pleased to have employed several young engineers through the contractor under the AEF to take part in the challenging project of expansion of sewage treatment works. The Expansion of Sha Tau Kok Sewage Treatment Works Phase 1 includes the construction of a temporary sewage treatment plant within 18 months followed by the in-situ reconstruction of a new sewage treatment plant to increase the treatment capacity by three times to 5 000 cubic metres per day.(The video is broadcasted in Cantonese) (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

Providing more short-term jobs for new colleagues to fill

The Government has launched the Job Creation Scheme under the Anti-epidemic Fund (AEF) to create around 30 000 time-limited jobs in the public and private sectors in the coming two years, thereby providing more job opportunities. Among others, new colleagues are reporting for duty in the Development Bureau (DEVB) and departments under its purview. Here we have two young people who have just joined the Electrical and Mechanical Services Department (EMSD), Ms HO Tsz-yan, Katherine, and Mr CHAN Chun-wa, Andy, to share why they joined the Government and what they have experienced in the new positions.Creating more than 6 500 short-term jobsIn view of the COVID-19 epidemic, the Government aims to create more short-term jobs to boost the vibrancy of the job market. The DEVB and departments under its purview, such as the EMSD, Drainage Services Department, Civil Engineering and Development Department, Buildings Department and Water Supplies Department, have created a total of more than 6 500 short-term jobs including government positions and those created through procurement of services from consultants or contractors under existing or new contractual arrangements. The jobs cover different trades, skill sets and academic requirements, providing job opportunities for professionals, technicians, backend office staff and fresh graduates. About 3 500 people are expected to report for duty in succession by the end of September.Facing difficulties in finding jobs under the pandemicMs Katherine HO, now the Publicity Officer of the EMSD, was previously an assistant manager in a small and medium enterprise, where she was laid off due to the pandemic. During her unemployment, she sent out about 300 cover letters but received very few replies. She says that, under the influence of the pandemic and the general economic environment, many companies are reluctant to spend money on employing additional staff, making it more difficult for the unemployed to find jobs. She is pleased to have been appointed to the new government position under the AEF. Mr Andy CHAN, who is a fresh graduate this year, shares the same view. He says many companies have stopped recruiting people, and are even laying off employees or imposing wage freezes, so he feels very fortunate to have landed this job as the Publicity Assistant for the EMSD in less than a month after graduation. Thoughtful guidance from supervisors and colleaguesMs Katherine HO studied Leisure Management in university. Currently, she mainly assists her colleagues to handle clerical work and organise workshop. The workshop aims at setting short- term and long-term goals for the EMSD to provide better services for the public. As it is not suitable to have face-to-face meetings due to the pandemic, she is exploring with colleagues the feasibility for the workshop to be held as usual in the format of on-line meetings. Ms Katherine HO says that, without previous related work experience, she was anxious when she first started her job in the engineering/electrical and mechanical field which was thought to be male-dominated. Thanks to the thoughtful guidance from her supervisors and colleagues, she has adapted to her new job quickly.Giving full play to his language abilitiesAs a fresh graduate from the School of English of the University of Hong Kong, Mr Andy CHAN now mainly takes part in editing a handbook on the regulation of railway safety. Presenting the services and operation of the Railways Branch of the EMSD, the handbook enables the public and the trade to have a deeper understanding of the department’s work in monitoring railway safety. As told by Mr Andy CHAN, when he first took up the job, he was worried that his inadequate knowledge of engineering and related technical jargon would affect his performance. However, he later found out that he could make use of his language skills to present the terminologies of engineering in a manner that is both in-depth and easy to comprehend, which would help to improve efficiency at work.Encouraging colleagues to grasp every opportunity to learnEngineer of the EMSD, Mr CHOW Kirk, Peter, says he is glad that the AEF has made it possible for the department to recruit new colleagues to share its heavy workload. The department will do its best to give them every opportunity to understand more about its operation. Also, he hopes that the basic training they receive can become useful in forging their future career. In this difficult period when the pandemic is raging throughout the city, he hopes his new colleagues will not lose heart but will be brave to accept challenges and seek more learning opportunities to build a solid foundation for future development.(The video is broadcasted in Cantonese) (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

Get equipped for a career in the maritime industry

Earlier, the Marine Department has invited youngsters to visit the Vessel Traffic Centre (VTC) and Marine Emergency and Maritime Rescue Co-ordination Centre (MRCC). Participants were able to acquire knowledge about the traffic of vessels in the Hong Kong port area and maritime technology regarding emergency communication and rescue operation at sea. Having learned about the functions and operations of the Marine Department, they can beef up the plans for their career development in the maritime industry. Let us join them in the exploratory visit. Are you ready? Check out the video for more information! (The video is conducted in Cantonese)

Right Tree, Right Place

When you look at the trees in the street, your attention is often only focused on the tree forms, whether they have beautiful flowers or cause any obstruction to the traffic and pedestrian flow, etc. In fact, you may not realise that the selection of tree species for street planting involves a lot of knowledge as every tree species has its unique “character”, and on top of that, they have to grow in the dense and compact city of Hong Kong. Thus, there are a series of considerations behind the decision.Capability to withstand different roadside conditionsThe Government has been striving to create a quality environment for urban planting to enrich vegetation diversity and enhance the outdoor environs, so as to provide outdoor spaces for public enjoyment. In this connection, the Greening, Landscape, and Tree Management Section (GLTMS) of the Development Bureau (DEVB) commissioned a consultancy study to provide a reference for selecting suitable tree species for different types of streets in Hong Kong. The GLTMS has completed and issued the Street Tree Selection Guide (the Guide). Here we have invited a landscape architect of the DEVB to introduce the details of the Guide and talk about the considerations in selecting tree species for the streets of Hong Kong. Recommendation on vegetation diversity in tree plantingCurrently, there are only around 20 species of trees planted at roadsides in the urban areas of Hong Kong, which account for about half of our urban trees. However, low diversity in the species planted is making our urban forests more vulnerable to outbreaks of pests and diseases and diminishes soil quality, consequently leading to higher maintenance pressure. The DEVB’s Landscape Architect (Greening and Landscape), Mr CHEUNG Ka-wai, Allen, says that the purpose of the Guide is to explore the possibility of planting a greater diversity of species and encourage the planting of suitable native species to improve the resilience of Hong Kong's urban forests through promotion of vegetation diversity under the "right tree, right place" principle, with a view to improving ecological health and minimising tree risks. Simply put, the width of pedestrian paths, soil volume, distribution of underground utilities and pipes, upper ground space, air flow, sunlight, etc. may affect the planting and growth of trees. Also, different tree characteristics such as buttress roots, forms and sizes may affect the selection of suitable planting locations. Therefore, the Guide provides a reference for government departments and industry stakeholders in selecting street tree species.To enable the public to have a better understanding of the tree species introduced in the Guide and the importance of selecting trees with essential attributes suitable for street environments, Mr Allen CHEUNG talks to us about some tree species suitable for street planting. One example is Xanthostemon chrysanthus, also known as Golden Penda. When Golden Penda blooms, the stamens will form a ball shape and the flowers are in bright colours. Its nectar provides food for wild animals. Most importantly, it has essential attributes suitable for the street environments in Hong Kong. For example, it can tolerate roadside pollution, less prone to pests and diseases, and is wind and drought tolerance. Preparing for more frequent extreme weatherTo address the more frequent occurrence of extreme weather conditions due to climate change, and to meet the challenges brought by ageing street trees, we need to make our urban forest more resilient and adaptable to enable sustainable development. Super Typhoon Mangkhut has caused extensive damage to our tree stock when it hit Hong Kong in 2018, but it also opens up opportunity for planting at the same time. After clearing the tree debris, various departments will carefully inspect the extent of damage of the planting sites and related areas. Trees will be replanted only if it is feasible and suitable to do so. To provide a better growing environment for the new trees, the number of trees to be replanted will depend on the sites’ condition. For example, trees will not be replanted on steep slopes (35 degrees or steeper) to safeguard public safety. Besides, departments will not indiscriminately pursue quantity or blindly follow the compensatory planting ratio of 1:1. Furthermore, departments will examine the feasibility of expanding the size of existing tree pits and study the potential of linking the soil volume below the pedestrian paths before replanting trees.Dedicated tree care and maintenanceAfter selecting suitable tree species, we have to make sure that other aspects of planting are also done properly. For example, tree stock quality, planting standards, and the implementation of associated planting works have to be appropriate. Therefore, we encourage landscape designers and departments to widely apply the Guide when replacing and planting street trees.As proper selection of tree species is only the first step and the work that comes afterwards is very important, departments will pay great attention to the maintenance of trees. Through routine maintenance and management, including regular yearly tree risk assessment, timely inspections and appropriate pruning, we can minimise the risks posed by trees to the public and their property. Moreover, our urban forest will grow healthily and sustainably. (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

Air Traffic and You (epi. 2)

Nowadays, leisure or business flight travels have become a part of life for many Hong Kong citizens. The Civil Aviation Department (CAD) has established the “Education Path” since 2013 to enhance public awareness on aviation safety. Through the guided tour services, the exhibition galleries provide the visitors with a formal channel to learn about the development history of the Hong Kong aviation industry, the roles of CAD, relevant airport facilities, airspace planning, air traffic control and aviation safety regulations. It also aims to attract the younger generation and interested ones to join CAD or the local aviation industry. (The video is conducted in Cantonese)

Air Traffic and You (epi. 1)

To provide the public with a better understanding of the service provided by the Civil Aviation Department regarding air traffic control and enactment of aviation safety regulations, equipment at the Air Traffic Control Centre (ATCC) and Control Tower, as well as the cabin and various emergency provisions are on display at the exhibition galleries in the “Education Path”. An Operations Officer is guiding us through the tour with details and fun. (The video is conducted in Cantonese)

DSE Way out: Government job

Q: Does the Government accept HKDSEqualifications for civil service appointments?A: The government has announced that results in the HKDSE Examination are accepted for civil service appointment purposes with effect from 20 July 2012. For related details, please visit the website of the Civil Service Bureau.Q: Does the results in the HKDSE Examination as equivalent to the results in the Common Recruitment Examination (CRE)?A: Level 5 or above in English Language of the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination (HKDSEE) is accepted as equivalent to Level 2 in the UE paper of the CRE.  Level 5 or above in Chinese Language of the HKDSEE is accepted as equivalent to Level 2 in the UC paper of the CRE.  Applicants with the above result(s) will NOT be arranged to take the UE and / or UC paper(s).Level 4 in English Language of the HKDSEE is accepted as equivalent to Level 1 in the UE paper of the CRE.  Level 4 in Chinese Language of the HKDSEE is accepted as equivalent to Level 1 in the UC paper of the CRE.  Applicants with the above result(s) may wish to take this into account in deciding whether they need to take the UE and / or UC paper(s) having regard to the requirements of the civil service post(s) in which they are interested. For related details, please visit the website of the Civil Service Bureau.Q. With the HKDSE in place, what is the acceptance arrangement for civil service posts with entry requirement set at “a pass in five subjects in HKCEE” and "2A3O"?A: Under the NAS, a combination of the following results in five subjects in the HKDSE Examination are accepted as meeting the requirement of “a pass in five subjects in HKCEE”:- Level 2 in Senior Secondary subjects;- “Attained” in Applied Learning (ApL) subjects (subject to a maximum of two ApL subjects); and- Grade E in Other Language subjects. A candidate attaining results in 5 subjects in HKDSE in any combination of the following will be regarded as having met the requirement for “2A3O”:- Level 3 in Senior Secondary subjects;- “Attained with Distinction” in ApL subjects (subject to a maximum of two ApL subjects); and- Grade c in Other Language subjects.For related details, please visit the website of the Civil Service Bureau. >>>Click here to search for a Government jobs now!

Harbor tour by Hong Kong Sea School (II)

In the last episode, we understand more about our future stars of maritime industry. In this episode we will take you to more spots the Harbour Tour has visited and listen to the plans of some other students regarding a career in the industry. (The video is conducted in Cantonese)

First outstanding female apprentice of the Water Supplies Department

To ensure the provision of a reliable and quality water supply service, the frontline work of the Water Supplies Department (WSD) is very crucial and our artisans have played an indispensable role. Since 2015 WSD has run an apprentice training scheme to nurture artisans, recruiting about ten Technician Trainee II (Waterworks) each year and offering them a series of on-the-job training. The first female apprentice under the scheme, Ms KAO Fuk-yee, Koey, received the Outstanding Apprentices Award by the Vocational Training Council, giving the department a shot in the arm for its dedication to training young people to join the industry. Turning to waterworks from business In 2016, at the suggestion of her friend, she, as a fresh graduate from an associate degree in Business, began to reckon that the engineering discipline had good development potential. She decided to give up pursuing a business career and turn to working in waterworks by studying the Basic Craft Course (Plumbing and Pipefitting) offered by the Construction Industry Council. In the same year, she had obtained an offer from the WSD and became its first female apprentice. During the training period, she was enrolling in the Craft Certificate in Plumbing and Pipefitting while undergoing the internship. Upon completion of the apprentice training scheme last year, she was employed by the WSD as an artisan. Practical and professional training During the two-year apprentice training, Koey was assigned to take up internship in various positions within the department, for example, learning the water treatment processes and the corresponding water quality monitoring procedures; learning how to use devices to detect the whereabout of the leakage on water mains in the Water Loss Management Unit; and learning ways to handle public enquiries on water quality and supply in the Customer Services Section. She was also assigned to the Distribution Section to assist in handling emergency water main burst cases. According to Koey, the apprentice training scheme is an eye-opener for her. Currently stationing in the Customer Services Section in Hong Kong and Islands Region, she is mainly responsible for replacing and conducting accuracy tests on aged meters, as well as handling customer enquiries on water quality and supply. She is pleased that the apprentice training has equipped her the skills that she can apply in her job. Strong as men through physical training As the work of artisans is physically demanding, it is a position that has been perceived as one dominated by males. Koey shares with us that it is indeed not easy for females, the physically weaker gender, to pick up a large pipe wrench weighing two to three pounds to install and remove meters, which she also finds difficult at times. To cope with the work, she persists in working out every week and has hit the gym four times a week at her peak to improve body strength. Now she can lift heavy items at ease. She also recalls when she was a newbie, what feared her most was working in some dark, dirty and wet courtyards, but she has got used to it now, which she says with a grin on her face. Tireless efforts of outstanding apprentices Koey believes that, apart from physical fitness, it is very important for artisans to be meticulous and observant. For instance, when inspecting pipes, one must observe carefully for any damaged parts. Whenever she comes across a special case or cases involving various rusting pipes, she will pay extra attention for future reference. In fact, many procedures that require physical strength can now be done with machines. For example, the valves of large-diameter pipes are now controlled electrically by a switch. Therefore, female workers are not put at an obvious disadvantage. However, to become an outstanding apprentice, one has to work extra hard to constantly upgrade oneself, and acquire more knowledge about waterworks through further studies and daily exposure at work, says Koey. (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese) (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

Advanced technologies to rehabilitate pipes

There are more than 4500 kilometres of underground stormwater drains and sewers across Hong Kong. Many of those in the old districts have been in use for over 30 years. The sewers, in particular, are more prone to ageing and deterioration due to prolonged exposure to corrosive gases brought by sewage. Drainage Services Department (DSD) has gradually rehabilitated the high-risk underground pipes by adopting a pipe repair method that requires no excavation of pipe trenches or road surfaces in order to alleviate inconvenience caused to the public during the works. Gradual rehabilitation of old pipesSerious wear and tear will cause pipe collapse and road subsidence, bringing adverse impact on traffic, environment and public safety. Since 2017, the DSD has initiated comprehensive planning for the phased investigation and rehabilitation of pipes that have been assessed to be of high risk and formulated a territory-wide replacement and rehabilitation programme. However, we have to face a number of challenges in carrying out drainage improvement works in urban areas. Hong Kong is congested not only with people and vehicles, but also with various underground utilities such as gas pipes, communication facilities and water pipes. The traditional “open trench” rehabilitation technology may inevitably affect traffic and residents. The benefit of the new trenchless technology introduced by the DSD in recent years is that pipes can be replaced and rehabilitated without the need to open up an entire road section. Only a temporary shaft is neededAccording to Engineer of the Project Management Division of the DSD, Mr CHEN Ka-yin, the trenchless pipe rehabilitation works only need to excavate a temporary shaft at an individual location to facilitate the insertion of new pipe material into an old pipe to form a new pipe. Under this method, the excavation requires less open space and a shorter duration of works, allowing traffic to resume quickly after the completion of works to minimise impacts to the public. Currently, subject to the damage of the pipes and on-site situations, the DSD mainly employs three trenchless technologies, namely cured-in-place-pipe (CIPP) lining, spirally-wound lining and slip-lining. CIPP lining technologyAccording to Mr CHEN Ka-yin, under the CIPP lining technology (that is commonly referred to as the “insertion into pig intestines” in Chinese), a soft polyester liner with a thickness of 10 to 40 millimetres is pulled into the host pipe through a “launch shaft”. The liner is then expanded and cured by steam or hot water until it hardens and forms a new pipe. This technology can be used on pipes under dry condition. In rehabilitating trunk sewers that still has water flow, we have to employ the spirally-wound lining technology instead. In this technique, a special winding machine is placed inside the pipeline to helically wind steel-reinforced polyethylene strips into circular shape to form a new pipe in the original pipe. Alternatively, the slip-lining method can also be used. As both methods are designed for the rehabilitation of running pipes, no interception is required. Slip-lining methodStanding at the construction site on Bailey Street in To Kwa Wan, Mr CHEN Ka-yin introduces the use of the slip-lining method at the site. First, a temporary shaft will be set up at an appropriate location. Part of the old pipeline will then be cut and exposed. After cleaning and inspection of the pipe, a 1.5-metre long fibreglass plastic liner will be pushed into the old or damaged pipe section by section. Then, with cement slurry filling the gap between the new and the old pipelines, a new pipe is formed. He points out that although a fibreglass plastic liner looks relatively thin, its structural strength is equal to that of a concrete pipe and its lifespan is up to 40 to 50 years. Planning for stage 2 worksAs the rehabilitation works of all stormwater drains and sewers in Hong Kong involves 18 districts, over the course of four months, colleagues of the DSD visited each of the districts to consult the relevant District Council committees and explain project details to stakeholders, so as to give an early start to the projects. Stage 1 works had begun and are scheduled for completion in 2022. Stage 2 works are scheduled to start in 2020 to conduct condition survey and rehabilitation of stormwater drains and sewers in six districts, including Tsuen Wan, Sham Shui Po and Yau Tsim Mong. (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese) (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

Mountain bike trails in South Lantau

During weekends, many people like to go cycling with their friends. But are you cyclists interested in cycling on rugged hilly terrains, dirt roads or even gravel paths? Currently, the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department has set up 15 designated mountain bike trails in country parks for mountain biking activities, three of which are located in south Lantau. One of the largest training grounds in Asia The CEDD has implemented improvement and expansion works for the mountain bike trail networks in south Lantau in phases. Chief Engineer of the Sustainable Lantau Office (SLO), Ms LAU Yiu-yan, Joyce, said that the first phase of the works aims mainly to improve the existing sections from Pui O to Kau Ling Chung and Chi Ma Wan for safer and better riding experience through strengthened control of soil erosion. The second phase of the works focuses on the construction of a new mountain bike training ground of about 4.5 hectares near Lai Chi Yuen Tsuen, which will become one of the largest training grounds in the Asian region, and on the expansion of several trails at the Mui Wo and Chi Ma Wan sections to form a circular network. Providing trails of different riding difficulties We found at the site that the construction of the training ground was nearing completion. Engineer of the SLO, Mr PANG Siu-tuen, Walter, said that the training ground provides trails of different riding difficulties for beginner, intermediate and advanced cyclists. Beginners can start with undulating trails, and then progress to a narrow skinny that allows only one bike to go through at a time. Different facilities cater for different levels of riders. To add more fun to the trails, the training ground was specially built with trails of different technical features, including berms, jumps, rock garden, switchback turns and pump tracks. For that purpose, the CEDD had specially invited an expert rider to help with the design. The Singaporean trail specialist of the International Mountain Bicycling Association, Mr H.M. LIM, gave live demonstrations and explained that trails of different challenging levels and features are normally designed to suit the actual site conditions. During construction, the design team had tried a range of options while developing different trails. Sustainable project design The Engineer, Mr Walter PANG, said that as the mountain bike trails in south Lantau fall within the country park area, their designs are all in line with the sustainable construction principle. For instance, the alignment has been designed to follow the terrains to avoid tree felling as far as possible so as to retain the original look of the country park; natural materials that are locally available have been used in projects such as the rock garden in the training ground that were laid with rocks collected from construction sites; hand tools or small machines have been used to avoid causing environmental damage, etc. In addition, as the tiny Romer’s tree frogs, a species unique to Hong Kong, were found on the site during construction, the original gathering place for riders was redesigned and relocated somewhere far away from the tree frogs. Furthermore, our colleagues have considered ways to extend the life cycle of the trails and reduce their need for maintenance. For instance, crossfall has been used as far as possible to drain away the surface runoff, and crushed stones have been placed at suitable locations to improve drainage performance, which will in turn prevent soil erosion and safeguard the users of mountain bike trails. Promoting healthy living The training ground has been already opened to the public. With its opening, the training ground will not only host training for beginners, but also provide mountain bike trails that meet the international standard for holding competition events, which can help nurture more local bikers and promote the development of mountain biking in Hong Kong. Hope that the novice, expert and enthusiastic riders will all make good use of the new training ground and the existing mountain bike trails in south Lantau, and enjoy the fun of mountain biking while taking pleasure in the beautiful, natural scenery of the country park. (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese) (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

Harbor tour by Hong Kong Sea School (I)

A Harbour Tour was arranged by the Marine Department for the “All-rounded Learning Week” held by Hong Kong Sea School. Wong, Marine Inspector II, explained to the participating students the Department’s daily work of managing the ports and relevant port facilities. Many students showed interest in joining the maritime industry. Take a look at the first video episode for places the Harbour Tour visited and the dreams of the students. (The video is conducted in Cantonese)

Father's Day Series: Assistant Electrical Inspector Mr CHUI Chi-kit of the Electrical and Mechanical Services Department

Here we have another frontline colleague, Mr CHUI Chi-kit, also a good father, who works behind the scenes in our bustling airport. Mr CHUI is an Assistant Electrical Inspector of the Airfield Facilities Section of the Airport and Vehicle Engineering Division (AVED) under the Electrical and Mechanical Services Department (EMSD), who is responsible for the maintenance and repair of landing and runway lights at the Hong Kong International Airport. He performs shift duty around the clock to ensure the proper functioning of the lighting systems, which are extremely important to aircrafts during takeoff and landing. Racing against time to complete the mission Starting out as a technician apprentice of EMSD, Mr CHUI Chi-kit graduated in 1999. He has rich E&M knowledge and skills and has worked at the airport for more than ten years. He said that there are currently 13,000 landing and runway lights on the airport runways, taxiways and aprons, which provide visual aid critical for pilots to take off and land with a clear vision of the runways at night and during periods of low visibility and inclement weather conditions. He and his colleagues work shifts around the clock to ensure the facilities are functioning properly. Their prompt action is needed to fix the problems immediately and they will lose no time in handling emergency situations, even in the small hours of the morning or in rainstorms. Given the very frequent flight movements, they have to race against time to complete their work on the runways in a very short time. While they quickly carry out inspections and repairs, they also need to pay attention to the radio instructions given by the control tower to ensure that the on-site environment is safe to work in. It is all about personal experience, concentration and co-operation among colleagues. Mr CHUI recalled that when Typhoon Hato hit Hong Kong last year bringing strong winds and heavy rains, outdoor facilities were more likely to break down than usual. Under the circumstances, he and his colleagues, along with staff of the AA, had to carry out their work dutifully and be ready to handle all kinds of emergency incidents anytime. They are also aware of the importance of safety at work in times of inclement weather. Mr CHUI said that the department has provided them with guidelines on work safety. They will receive thunderstorm and lightning alerts and there are safe areas at the aprons for the maintenance personnel to take temporary shelter to ensure the safety of frontline staff. Saying "No" to being a "helicopter parent" As a young father, Mr CHUI admitted that he is still at the learning stage. As he works irregular hours, he treasures every moment he spends with his son on his days off. His son is only four years old, but Mr CHUI hopes that he will, as a grown-up, understand some basic moral principles, such as having a sense of responsibility towards self and others, as well as working hard at school and at work. He said that he has no intention of becoming a "helicopter parent" and does not want to put his son under too much pressure. Having said that, he sets a high standard for his son’s character, hoping to teach him good virtues and politeness at an early age. He would like to be his son's "close friend" and solve problems together with him on his life journey. The E&M industry offers myriad career choices. As fate has put him to work in the airport, Mr CHUI particularly feels the great responsibility of his work as it is related to aviation safety. Whenever he travels with his family by air, he especially tells his son about his work at the airport and hopes that he will develop a keen interest in aeroplanes and airports unconsciously. Keen demand for E&M talent E&M facilities are found throughout Hong Kong and are closely related to our daily lives. In addition, the development of large-scale infrastructure as well as housing and railway projects also helps the E&M industry grow steadily with a keen demand for E&M talent. Since the launch of the "Apprentice Training Scheme" (now named "Technician Training Scheme") in 1955, EMSD has successfully nurtured more than 6,000 professional technicians. Among them, many have become professionals or been promoted to the management level through continuous education and accumulation of work experience. Mr CHUI is one of the examples. (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese) . (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

Father’s Day Series: Drain Chargeman Mr KOO Wai-ming of the Drainage Services Department

As Father’s Day is approaching, we would like to share with you a frontline worker and his little story as a father, so as to show our support for all good dads. Mr KOO Wai-ming has worked in the DSD for over three decades.  Starting out as a Workman II, he was promoted to Drain Chargeman 10 years ago.  He is not only a senior staff member in our department with total dedication, but also a guardian angel for his child. Currently, the DSD has 11 teams under the Direct Labour Force for clearing blocked drains, each with four to five Leading Sewermen or Workmen II led by a Drain Chargeman to discharge their duties.  More than clearing blocked drains Sharing his job experience, Mr KOO said that when an Amber/Red/Black rainstorm warning or a typhoon signal is hoisted, the DSD colleagues have to remain on standby on a rotational basis, 24 hours a day, at the Emergency Co-ordination Centre (ECC) to receive and handle public requests for assistance.  The frontline staff, once alerted by the ECC, will rush to the scene across the territory.  Upon arriving at the scene, the DSD workers will first use devices to test for any poisonous or explosive gas before opening manholes.  After that, they will desilt the blocked drains with rattan strips or high-pressure water jets. Handling emergency cases with a clear head Talking about his most memorable experience, Mr KOO recalled that he had once received an urgent request from a member of the public.  Arriving at the scene, he found the female caller emotionally unstable.  He did his best to comfort the lady, while at the same time he had to take prompt action with his colleagues to solve the blockage problem.  He later realised that the lady, being a new mother, had made incessant phone calls simply because she was worried that the foul water would affect her baby.  The incident tells him that there are always reasons behind the requests for assistance or complaints from the public or those in need, and therefore they should help them solve their problems as fast as possible with a positive attitude. A tough man’s tender love for his son Besides his work, our tough man Mr KOO also shared with us his family life.  When he talked about his family and his love for his son, his sentimental side shone through.  He has a 12-year-old son.  As he works shifts, he sometimes has to work on Saturdays and Sundays.  Whenever there is an emergency, he is required to go on duty at all hours and even has to work overnight.  At times, his son complains that he is often not at home.  As a father, he can only explain to his son with patience that his work is to serve the community and there is a public need for his service.  He hopes that his son will understand better as he grows up.  In the past, he read his son stories.  In the blink of an eye, his son will soon become a Secondary One student and the way they get along has changed a lot.  One thing is certain, however, he just cannot be too strict with his son and they need to communicate as friends to maintain their bonds. The name of Mr KOO’s son, KOO Chung-hang, carries a special meaning.  Mr KOO believes that all parents have expectations of their children.  He said the name he picked for his son comes from Confucius, whose second name is Zhongni (Chung-nei in Cantonese), with “Chung” meaning integrity.  Although he does not expect his son to have great achievements, he hopes his son will be a good, virtuous and righteous man.  Regarding his son’s future occupation, he said it will be up to his son. (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese) (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

Drainage Services Department's remote-controlled desilting robot

In Hong Kong, the rainy season generally starts in April. In order to further reduce flood risks during rainstorms, the Drainage Services Department (DSD) has introduced the “just-in-time clearance” arrangement this year. It has also adopted new technologies in using a new remote-controlled desilting robot for silt clearing works at box culverts to enhance the efficiency of desilting works. Preventing silt accumulation from affecting the drainage capacityHong Kong faces an average rainfall of about 2 400 millimetres a year, one of the highest among cities in the Pacific Rim. According to Mr POON Tin-yau, an engineer of the DSD, when stormwater is discharged into the sea through box culverts, the washed-off sand, stones and dust will accumulate gradually at the drains to form silt, which will in turn affect the drainage capacity and may lead to flooding in the most serious cases. To avoid the above situation, the department inspects the box culverts on a regular basis and arranges the desilting works if necessary to ensure that the drains are functioning properly. Operating as a vacuum cleanerEarly this year, a new remote-controlled desilting robot was introduced into the DSD. The DSD conducted a pilot test on the use of the robot for desilting works at the box culverts in Sham Shui Po and Tsuen Wan with its functions monitored. The robot will be lifted up with a crane and sent into the box culvert concerned through its opening. With the help of closed-circuit television and sonic survey, the operator can then observe the conditions inside the box culvert and remotely operate the robot for desilting from his workstation. Mr POON Tin-yau says that the robot, measuring approximately 3 metres in length, and 1.5 metres in both width and height, works similarly to a vacuum cleaner. Once the silt is sucked by the robot, it will be pumped to a temporary silt container on the ground through a tube connected to the robot. The silt will be transported to a landfill only after dewatering. Enhancing work safetyAccording to the traditional desilting method, workers need to go into the box culverts for installation and operation of desilting devices. Given that box culverts are confined spaces, workers working inside will face certain safety risks. The traditional method also requires interception of water flow in the culverts to allow workers to work in an environment without water flowing through, which means the work is limited mostly to dry seasons. On the contrary, the remote-controlled desilting robot can take over diving tasks to spare workers from going into confined and submerged space of the box culverts. Apart from enhancing work safety, the use of the robot allows desilting works in rainy seasons, which in turn will expedite the progress of such works, lower the costs and significantly improve the desilting efficiency. Implementation of the “just-in-time clearance” arrangementFurthermore, the DSD had analysed more than 200 flooding cases between 2017 and 2019, finding that more than 60 percent of them were due to blockage of drains by litter, fallen leaves or other washouts carried by surface runoff. This year, the department will implement the “just-in-time clearance” arrangement. Before the onset of a rainstorm, staff will be deployed to inspect about 200 drain locations in the territory which are susceptible to blockage by litter, fallen leaves or the like, and will immediately arrange for clearance if necessary. The department will also send staff to inspect and clear all major drainage intakes and river channels to prevent blockage after a rainstorm or when a typhoon signal is about to be lowered so as to prepare for the challenges of further rainstorms. Constructing more underground stormwater storage tanksApart from strengthening the responsive management measures before and after rainstorms, the DSD will continue to press ahead with its flood prevention strategy, which includes constructing more underground stormwater storage tanks to collect and temporarily store excessive rainwater during rainstorms, thus reducing the loading at downstream drains and the consequential flood risks. At present, six locations are under planning, including Shek Kip Mei Park, Tai Hang Tung Recreation Ground (extension), the Urban Council Centenary Garden in Tsim Sha Tsui, as well as Sau Nga Road Playground, Kwun Tong Ferry Pier Square and Hoi Bun Road Park in Kwun Tong District. (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese) (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

Enhancement of legal aid services through innovative use of information technology (Legal Aid Department)

The Legal Aid Department (LAD) commits to providing quality customer-oriented legal aid services. Aiming to improve service efficiency and provide prompt response to customers, LAD has developed new online services with the latest information technology to keep legal aid services abreast of the times. Service 1: EFFECTIVE USE OF QR CODES The pamphlet entitled How Your Financial Resources & Contribution are Calculated published by LAD contains calculation examples of different scenarios. However, as the rates of personal allowances and financial eligibility limits for legal aid are adjusted oftentimes, the calculation examples in the pamphlet require frequent updates, which are effort and time demanding but ephemeral. Resources were squandered consequently. To resolve the difficulty, LAD has added in the pamphlet relevant QR codes, through which members of the public can access the latest calculation examples on LAD’s website. When there is any adjustment to the calculation examples, it is necessary to update only the information on the website but not the pamphlet. Not only does this help protect the environment, but printing costs and staff resources could also be saved. Service 2:  MOBILE VERSION OF MEANS TEST CALCULATOR Since means assessment involves many factors concerning a legal aid applicant, LAD introduced in December 2008 an online Means Test Calculator, which provides a convenient way for members of the public to find out whether they are likely to be eligible for legal aid on means. The mobile version of the Means Test Calculator was subsequently introduced for easy access by mobile devices anytime anywhere. Service 3: ENHANCING SERVICES BY INSTANT TRANSLATION SYSTEM To overcome the language barrier faced by people of diverse race in making legal aid applications and the shortage of interpreters, LAD has developed an instant translation system, which can display and read out questions in languages commonly used by people of diverse race. The system also connects to an online translation programme which can translate the answers provided by legal aid applicants of diverse race in their own languages into English. LAD staff may then identify and provide suitable information to them to facilitate their legal aid applications. (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

Training beyond innovation (Electrical and Mechanical Services Department)

To support the implementation of this policy by various divisions, the Training Unit of the Electrical and Mechanical Services Department (EMSD) has taken the lead to apply I&T in its core training and enhanced the Technician Training Scheme to cultivate young professional teams with international vision, thereby injecting new blood into the E&M trade so as to tie in with the Government’s policy objective of building a smart city and developing I&T. IMPROVING TRAINING EFFECTIVENESS WITH I&T EMSD has converted a workshop in its headquarters building into a new digitalised Interactive Learning Centre in four months. Holographic images and three-dimensional projection technology are used to present to trainees the E&M equipment in buildings in great detail, which facilitates their clear understanding of the equipment’s structure and improves training efficiency. Moreover, the Department has tailor-designed various virtual reality training facilities, which not only enhance the flexibility, safety and coverage of training activities, but also significantly reduce the consumption of physical materials to achieve environmental benefits. JOINT TALENT TRAINING WITH THE TRADE To address the problem of an ageing workforce and manpower shortage in the E&M trade, EMSD enhanced its Technician Training Scheme, under which 100 places are added every year to nurture more young trainees so as to meet the needs arising from the digitalisation development. The Department has also collaborated with the trade and arranged for trainees to undergo internship in private organisations. Their performance has won recognition from the trade. Not only does this arrangement enrich the work experience of trainees, but it also helps solve the problem of manpower shortage in those organisations, a win-win for all. BROADENING INTERNATIONAL HORIZONS THROUGH TRAINING In order to enhance the skills of trainees and promote learning and exchange between young people in Hong Kong and Guangzhou, EMSD has signed the Memorandum of Co-operation on E&M Talent Development with the Guangzhou Municipal Human Resources and Social Security Bureau to train E&M talents for both cities and upgrade their skills as a whole. To broaden the international horizons of trainees, the Department encouraged them to participate in the biennial WorldSkills Competition. Two EMSD trainees who took part in the “Electrical Installations” and “Refrigeration and Air-conditioning” trades won in the WorldSkills Hong Kong and went on to represent Hong Kong in the WorldSkills Competition held in Kazan, Russia in August 2019. Coached by expert trainers, both trainees won Medallions for Excellence in the Competition, bringing glory to Hong Kong while proving that the technical skills of Hong Kong’s E&M personnel have attained international standards. (The video is conducted in Cantonese) (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

Mother's Day Series: Senior Engineer Ms LAM Sze-mei, Janet, of the Electrical and Mechanical Services Department

Here we would like to introduce another colleague from the government and also a good mother, Ms LAM Sze-mei, Janet. As a Senior Electrical and Mechanical Engineer of the Electrical and Mechanical Services Department (EMSD), she is responsible for leading more than 200 colleagues of Hong Kong Island to carry out maintenance and repair of electrical and mechanical (E&M) facilities in government buildings. She also performs standby duty around the clock to handle emergency incidents. She is going to share with us her daily work and her own feelings as a working mum. Maintenance for “Ventilation, Fire, Water and Electricity” Janet joined the EMSD as an Engineering Graduate in 1997 and has served the department for more than 20 years. Currently, she is responsible for leading her colleagues to maintain and repair the E&M facilities that are commonly known as facilities of “Ventilation, Fire, Water and Electricity”, i.e. the air-conditioning system, fire service installations, water supply system and electrical systems, inside government buildings on Hong Kong Island. For example, they provide routine repair services, carry out periodic inspection and testing, follow up on malfunction and complaint cases, and implement improvement and enhancement works. The buildings under their purview include the Central Government Offices at Tamar, the Justice Place in Central, the Hong Kong Court of Final Appeal and the three buildings at the Wan Chai Government Offices Compound, etc. Operation of real-time remote monitoring system Janet says that in recent years, the EMSD has strived to introduce advanced technology to optimise the performance of E&M systems in government buildings so as to enhance the efficiency of repair and maintenance works. One example is the implementation of a pilot project by installing the integrated Building Management System for E&M facilities of different government departments, which enables the integration of electrical, mechanical, air-conditioning and building services systems into a single platform. This allows colleagues of the EMSD to be able to remotely monitor the operation of E&M facilities in real time anywhere through an online platform. In case if any deviation from the design parameters and particular circumstances is identified, staff will be immediately deployed to follow up so as to ensure predictive maintenance is accomplished at an early stage to prevent potential failure. Enhancing energy efficiency Besides, Janet says that the above system can also work with the Building Energy Management System to collect and store building energy data, such as the efficiency, electricity consumption and carbon emission of E&M facilities. In this manner, colleagues can analyse and assist various departments to formulate the most appropriate energy optimisation strategies to save energy costs and attain the targets of energy saving and emission reduction. Recently, the department has undertaken related work at the North Point Government Offices, resulting in reduction of the electricity consumption of the building by 3 to 5%. To further enhance energy efficiency, the EMSD plans to install relevant systems to the E&M facilities of more than 400 major government buildings under the Electrical and Mechanical Services Trading Fund – The 2nd 5-year Strategic Plan (i.e., from 2018/19 to 2022/23). Unforgettable experience: Typhoon Mangkhut hitting Hong Kong Talking about unforgettable experiences in her career, Janet recalls what happened when Typhoon Mangkhut hit Hong Kong. Although her team had taken proper precautionary measures for E&M facilities in government buildings beforehand, the typhoon was so fierce that her mobile phone became inundated with group chat messages from frontline staff deployed at different locations, all reporting emergency situations to her during the typhoon. Janet describes that she felt like fighting a battle of one versus one hundred when dealing with those phone messages. While worrying about the safety of her workmates, she had to make immediate decisions to handle unexpected incidents. According to Janet, strong waves flooded the switch room in the Government Logistics Centre near Heng Fa Chuen at that time. With the series of contingency measures, such as pre-checking of circuit diagram information for emergency repairs, emergency preparations made with the power company, and backup power arrangement, having been drawn up by her team beforehand, the building was able to resume 90% of its operations immediately after the typhoon had passed. After Mangkhut, the department, in collaboration with the Architectural Services Department, identified another location as the entrance/exit of the switch room to prevent similar flooding incidents in the future. Besides, a remote monitoring system for the switch room and a remote switch control system for the emergency generator are in the pipeline. Teaching daughter to pursue dreams Janet feels the pressure of being a working mother because of her hectic work life. She also feels sorry for her daughter who has just entered secondary school. Therefore, she tries her best to spend the weekends with her daughter and travels with her family during long holidays so that they can enjoy family life together. She smilingly says that she has certain expectations for her daughter, but luckily she is not much of a “tiger mom” in her daughter’s eyes. As her daughter has had many dreams ever since an early age, Janet hopes to focus her parenting on teaching her daughter about the pursuit of dreams, so that she can find her path to happiness, enjoy learning and foster good character. Janet says that her daughter had always wanted to learn horse riding, so she arranged a riding course for her two years ago. Sometimes she is heartbroken to see her daughter fall off from the horseback, but she is pleased that her daughter is able to get up after a fall and ride back on, knowing that she can overcome difficulties and pain all by herself. No matter what her daughter does in the future, Janet hopes that she will have the courage to overcome any obstacles, look afar and jump even further. (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese) (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

Mother's Day Series: Geotechnical Engineer Ms TING Sui-man

Here we would like to introduce to you a colleague from the government who is also a good mother, Ms TING Sui-man. Ms TING Sui-man, joined the Geotechnical Engineering Office (GEO) of the Civil Engineering and Development Department (CEDD) as Geotechnical Engineer back in 2011. She has worked in two different divisions, both of which are related to landslide emergency services. A petite and cheerful lady, Ms TING is “Ting Ting” to her colleagues. Coordinating Landslide Emergency Services Currently, Ms TING is mainly responsible for assisting in the coordination of the GEO’s landslide emergency services. With over 200 geotechnical engineers and technical officers working shifts, the GEO provides 24-hour emergency services all year round to give geotechnical advice to government departments on contingency actions to be taken in case of danger arising from landslides. The GEO will, among others, assess the situation at scene and advise whether closure of roads, evacuation of residents from the affected buildings, and urgent repair works should be implemented. When a landslip warning or typhoon signal number 8 or above has been issued by the Hong Kong Observatory (HKO), the GEO’s Emergency Control Centre (ECC) in the Civil Engineering and Development Building at Homantin will be activated to handle landslide incidents, safeguard public safety, and assist government departments to restore public facilities affected by the incidents. Ms TING is responsible for the coordination of various supporting activities, such as deployment of staff to work shifts, ensuring the proper functioning of equipment and helping in the dispatch of geotechnical engineers to the landslide scenes as soon as possible for assessment. Therefore, she must be prepared to start her work anytime during the entire rainy season. Furthermore, she is also responsible for the arrangement of training on landslide emergency services for colleagues. As a matter of fact, the GEO has introduced virtual reality environment for such training this year. Climbing mountains and wading rivers under the scourging sun and in the rain Having been a geotechnical engineer for years, for a period of time in her career, Ms TING had to make a long and difficult journey to work in some remote areas. Her first position in the GEO was to operate the Landslip Warning System and manage the raingauges operated by the GEO. There are about 90 GEO automatic raingauges all over Hong Kong, with some located in places as far as Fan Lau in Lantau Island, Po Toi Island and Tap Mun. As decisions on whether to issue a landslip warning are made jointly by the HKO and GEO with reference to data collected from raingauges and other information, Ms TING and technical officers have to build and repair raingauges under the scourging sun or in the rain from time to time. This is not an easy task according to Ms TING.Motivation comes from her children A mother of a son and a daughter, Ms TING admits that she is inevitably feeling stressed as she has to fulfil the heavy commitments of both work and family life, which includes meeting her children’s education needs. That said, her children are her biggest motivation. After a day of work, her son would offer his arm for her head to rest on, while her daughter would say she is looking for a book named “100 ways to be happy” to cheer her up. Ms TING says that she does not want to be a “monster mom”, so she would never require her children to be at the top of the class, or to participate in too many talent training programmes. She wants them to be able to grow up in a relaxed and happy environment. Smilingly, she says that some of her fondest moments are seeing her children coming back from school, sweating a lot with dishevelled hair, showing that they must have had a good day at school. However, she does have a certain level of expectation on her children’s moral values, especially as our society is so full of temptations. She hopes that her children will “keep a moral compass”, whereby they can distinguish right from wrong and know what should or should not be done. She believes that by having the right thoughts, taking the right action and saying the right words, they will lead a life of abundance and success.To maintain public safety, they need to remain unfazed and always get prepared to offer emergency service in times of inclement weather. On top of that, they are also shouldering family responsibilities. We hope that everyone will continue to provide unlimited support and encouragement for all the hard-working, good mothers on earth, whether it is Mother’s Day or not. (The video is broadcasted in Cantonese) (The video is provided by Development Bureau)

Boosts employment by increasing temporary jobs (Development Bureau)

The Chief Executive has announced earlier a series of measures on job retention, job creation and job advancement under the Anti-epidemic Fund. It is suggested to create around 30000 time-limited jobs in the public and private sectors in the coming two years to reduce unemployment, the situation of which has been worsened owing to the COVID-19 epidemic. The Development Bureau and departments under it are taking proactive actions to facilitate and implement these measures by providing about 4700 temporary jobs of a wide variety in the times to come. Provide 4700 temporary jobs These temporary jobs cover various areas and people with different skills and academic qualifications, including professionals and technical and back-office support officers, will be eligible. Fresh graduates can also apply for internship programmes on building surveying, urban planning, estate surveying, land surveying and engineering, etc. Of the 4700 new job openings, more than 530 are provided by the government while 4100 and more are openings from private organisations. Some of the job openings will be in place in three months progressively. Digitailise the E&M assets Among these openings, the Electrical and Mechanical Services Department plans to recruit 1200 temporary staff with service terms of up to 18 months. Half of the employees will be responsible for cleaning electrical and mechanical (E&M) systems at several thousand governmental buildings, while the other half will assist in the digitalization of E&M assets. Inspect drainage pipes Besides, the Buildings Department will appoint consultancy firms to inspect drainage pipes at the external walls of over 20000 targeted private domestic and composite buildings in Hong Kong. The appointed firms will have to recruit extra manpower and hence are expected to create more than 400 job openings. Improve buildings safety The Buildings Department will also recruit 120 short-term staff whose job duties include: speeding up the processing of drainage repair order yet to be complied with and cases of misconnection of drainage; organising public educational and promotional activities, etc. Amid the COVID-19 epidemic, the government aims to add momentum to the labour market by increasing short-term job openings for people from all walks of life, from professionals, technical and supporting officers to fresh graduates. (The video is narrated in Cantonese) (The video is provided by the Development Bureau)