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Job Corner for Non-Ethnic Chinese

Non-ethnic Chinese have equal access to government job opportunities Appointment to the civil service is based on the principle of open and fair competition.  All candidates are assessed on the basis of their ability, performance and character, and having regard to the stipulated entry requirements set according to the job requirements of the grade concerned. Heads of Department / Grade, having regard to the job requirements of the grades under their respective purview, specify appropriate Chinese and English language proficiency requirements (LPRs) as part of the entry requirements for the grades concerned.  This arrangement is in line with the guidance of the Equal Opportunities Commission issued in accordance with the Race Discrimination Ordinance.  It is Government policy to ensure the Chinese and English LPRs for all the grades of the civil service are no more than necessary for performance of the job, so that Non-ethnic Chinese, like other applicants, have equal access to government job opportunities.   Language Proficiency Requirements for Civil Service Jobs Latest Civil Service Vacancies with Lowered / Relatively Lower Language Proficiency Requirements Stories of Non-ethnic Chinese Civil Servants Useful Links   Language Proficiency Requirements for Civil Service Jobs It is the established policy to maintain a biliterate (Chinese and English) and trilingual (Cantonese, Putonghua and English) Civil Service in order to meet the long-term operational and development needs.  The language proficiency requirements of civil service grades are normally laid down as part of the entry requirements for recruitment – for degree / professional grades, the language proficiency requirements are normally set at either Level 2 or Level 1 in the two language papers (viz. Use of Chinese (UC) and Use of English (UE)) in the Common Recruitment Examination (CRE), or equivalent [Note 1];  for non-degree grades with academic qualification requirements at the Hong Kong Certificate of Education Examination (HKCEE) level or above, the language proficiency requirements are normally at least Level 2 in Chinese Language and English Language subjects in the HKCEE, or equivalent [Note 2]; for non-degree grades with academic qualification requirements lower than the HKCEE level, the language proficiency requirements are normally aligned with the minimum academic qualification prescribed for the concerned grades; and for non-degree grades that do not have any prescribed academic qualification, the language proficiency requirements are also set at a level commensurate with the job requirements of the concerned grades.   Language proficiency requirements of particular grades will be shown at the relevant recruitment advertisements.  Applicants are normally required to meet the language proficiency requirements before job applications.  Enquiries on the language proficiency requirements and recruitment plan of particular grades can be directed to the recruiting grades / departments. [Note 1] Language Proficiency Requirements Some examples of examination results which equivalent to certain level in the UE or UC paper of the CRE Level 2 in the UE paper of the CRE Level 5 or above in English Language of the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination (HKDSEE) Grade C or above in Use of English of the Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE) or in English Language of the General Certificate of Education (Advanced Level) (GCE A Level) An overall band of 6.5 or above with no subtest score below band 6 obtained in the same sitting in the Academic Module of the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) within the 2-year validity period of the test Level 2 in the UC paper of the CRE Level 5 or above in Chinese Language of the HKDSEE Grade C or above in Chinese Language and Culture or Chinese Language and Literature of the HKALE Level 1 in the UE paper of the CRE Level 4 in English Language of the HKDSEE Grade D in Use of English of the HKALE or in English Language of the GCE A Level Level 1 in the UC paper of the CRE Level 4 in Chinese Language of the HKDSEE Grade D in Chinese Language and Culture or Chinese Language and Literature of the HKALE   [Note 2] For civil service appointment purpose, Grade C and Grade E in Chinese Language and English Language (Syllabus B) in HKCEE before 2007 are accepted administratively as comparable to Level 3 and Level 2 respectively in Chinese Language and English Language in the 2007 HKCEE and henceforth.  Grade C and Grade D in Chinese Language and English Language in International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE) / General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) / General Certificate of Education (Ordinary Level)(GCE O Level) are accepted as comparable to Level 3 and Level 2 in Chinese Language and English Language respectively in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination (HKDSEE) / HKCEE for civil service appointments.  "Attained" and "Attained with Distinction" results in the Applied Learning Chinese (for non-Chinese speaking students) subject is accepted respectively as meeting the Chinese language proficiency requirements of Level 2 and Level 3 in Chinese Language in HKDSEE.       Latest Civil Service Vacancies with Lowered / Relatively Lower Language Proficiency Requirements For latest civil service vacancies with lowered / relatively lower Language Proficiency Requirements, please click here for more details.  (The list of job vacancies only serves as a summary for easy reference.  For full details and the latest position of the listed job vacancies, please visit the online Government Vacancies Enquiry system on the Civil Service Bureau website.)       Stories of Non-ethnic Chinese Civil Servants Here's a video about government job opportunities for Non-Ethnic Chinese:   Useful Links Government Vacancies Enquiry System - which provides full details and the latest position of government job vacancies. Race Relations Unit of Home Affairs Department - which provides a range of support services to ethnic minorities. Employment Services for Ethnic Minorities of Labour Department - which provides a range of employment-related support services to ethnic minorities job seekers.  

Summer Intern in Government 2020 (Keep updating...)

The 2020 Post-Secondary Student Summer Internship Programme has been launched. The Programme provides internship placement opportunities for students who are permanent residents of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and enrolled in full-time accredited post-secondary programmes offered by post-secondary institutions in or outside Hong Kong.Bureaux/departments would advertise their internship placement opportunities (where applicable) on their respective departmental websites and CSB's website. In addition, they may make arrangement with individual post-secondary institutions to nominate students for the Programme.Government summer internship programmes open for application as at 30/3/2020Home Affairs Department, Summer Intern Closing Date:01/04/2020 17:00:00Apply and Details Invest Hong Kong, Summer InternClosing Date:02/04/2020 17:00:00Apply and DetailsGovernment Logistics Department, Summer Intern Closing Date:02/04/2020 23:59:00Apply and DetailsEfficiency Office, Summer Intern (Customer Service) Closing Date: 02/04/2020 23:59:00Apply and Details Civil Aviation Department, Summer Internship Closing Date: 06/04/2020 23:59:00Apply and Details Audit Commission, Summer Intern Closing Date: 08/04/2020 23:59:00Apply and Details Education Bureau, Summer Intern (Educational Psychology)Closing Date: 20/04/2020 18:00:00Apply and Details Immigration Department, Summer Intern Closing Date: 22/04/2020 17:00:00Apply and Details   Application proceduresStudents who are interested in the placement opportunities advertised may download the standard application form or use the prescribed application forms as provided by individual bureaux/departments (where applicable) and submit their applications to 1) the recruiting bureaux/departments or;2) their respective institutions according to the methods as set out in the advertisements. (*Please follow the application procedures set out in the advertisements) (**To safeguard personal data privacy, students are reminded not to submit their personal data other than through the above channels)(***Please note the deadlines set by the respective institutions)Hong Kong students in non-local post-secondary institutionsHong Kong students studying in non-local post-secondary institutions must complete the application forms, which can be downloaded from the website of the Civil Service Bureau, and send the completed application form together with all necessary documents to the enquiry address of the individual bureaux/departments by post on or before the closing date of application (according to postmark). Please specify on the envelope the post being applied for. Applicants should ensure that sufficient postage is affixed before posting so as to avoid unsuccessful delivery of application. Mail items bearing insufficient postage will NOT be received by bureaux/departments and will be handled by the Hong Kong Post in accordance with the Post Office Ordinance. Late or incomplete applications will not be considered.

The pilot scheme of Tuen Mun Park inclusive play space (Architectural Services Department, Leisure and Cultural Services Department)

The Architectural Services Department (ArchSD) and the Leisure and Cultural Services Department (LCSD) have introduced the first inclusive playground in Hong Kong at Tuen Mun Park with two natural elements of “water” and “sand” in the design. This playground aims at providing a well-designed environment which allows children of different ages and abilities to equally enjoy a variety of physical, sensory and social play experiences. Children can take up challenges commensurate with their ability and interact with others while enjoying themselves in this playful environment. COMMUNITY DESIGN AND USER-ORIENTED APPROACH To respond to the demand for inclusive play spaces, ArchSD and LCSD swiftly implemented the winning schemes of the Inclusive Play Space Design Ideas Competition. Only a month after the competition, ArchSD had already completed the master layout plan and worked closely with LCSD on this project through exchange of ideas and inter-departmental design workshops. ArchSD and LCSD believe that the playground should be user-oriented. Stakeholders of various sectors were invited to join a series of focus group workshops and potential users’ views were collected. School children from Tuen Mun were invited to contribute ideas on the design of the sensory walls and the floor pattern of the water play area. The amazingly creative ideas of the children were gathered and seamlessly incorporated in the final design. The Tuen Mun District Council was also consulted and a swing area with feature swings were introduced to address the requests of the local community. COLLABORATE CLOSELY TO CATER TO DIFFERENT NEEDS To strike a balance between safety, enjoyment and inclusiveness, ArchSD and LCSD adopted an innovative approach to the design and management of the playground. Through collaborative team meetings and training workshops throughout the design and construction stages, the two departments discussed the management and maintenance arrangement of the playground, and all front-line staff were familiar with the inclusive design concept as well as the maintenance standard of the play equipment. ArchSD also customised suitable tools and accessories to facilitate the safe and effective work of LCSD’s team. Besides, ArchSD and LCSD had invited school children and professional bodies to join the experiencing workshops and trial play sessions, which not only promoted the project but also served as trial runs. Both departments could also observe the usage, survey users’ opinions, and conduct evaluation for the continuous improvement of the playground facilities and management. SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENT AND SUCCESSFUL INNOVATION The playground has been very popular and well received by the public, with extensive media coverage and shares on social media platforms. The concept of inclusive play has been successfully promoted in Hong Kong through this pilot project. It has won Gold Award 2018 presented by the Hong Kong Institute of Landscape Architects, the Special Architectural Award – Inclusive Design presented by the Hong Kong Institute of Architects, and the Annual Design Award presented by ArchSD, and has gained recognition from various government departments as well as committees on children and barrier-free affairs. Frequent site visits to the Park were held to share the experience gained. (The video is provided by Development Bureau) (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

New gear to save lives (Civil Aid Service)

Super typhoon Mangkhut left a path of destruction in Hong Kong last year when it knocked down more than 60,000 trees and caused extensive damage to the city. This year, the Government is readying for the wet season with new equipment and exercises to optimise its emergency response. One such drill, which put the Civil Aid Service’s preparedness for emergency operations to the test, saw service personnel efficiently cut apart a collapsed tree with new high-powered chainsaws in a Tsuen Wan campsite. Civil Aid Service (Department) Operations & Training Assistant Ng Shing-chiu said the new chainsaws are suitable for most scenarios involving typhoons. “The new chainsaw models have much more power and are simpler to use. “Another piece of equipment that has been introduced is the extended pole saw, which can stretch as high as 21 ft to reach broken branches on treetops.” To guarantee the chainsaw operator’s safety, the service also started using two types of protective chaps made of materials that can stop a chainsaw’s rotation, Mr Ng added. Better response Besides tree clearance, the service needs to deal with flooding, casualty evacuation, evacuation of residents and management of temporary shelters. It has introduced different types of specialised equipment to handle such scenarios, such as new and more comfortable life jackets for rescuers and victims. Previously the service only had one size of throwline, but now there are various sizes and lengths for different flood rescue scenarios. The rescuer can throw these throwlines from the shore or use them while they are in the water. Civil Aid Service (Department) Acting Principal Operations & Training Officer Chui Ka-yi said: “The service has seen all-around improvement in terms of equipment, training and relief effort strategies. “We also gained valuable experience from our deployment when super typhoons Mangkhut and Hato smashed into Hong Kong.” The service will hold talks and workshops in Kwun Tong and Sha Tin to introduce measures that residents should take when facing emergencies.” (For more details, please visit News.gov.hk website)

Butterflies add colour to HK (Field Officer II)

Tam Kin-chung joined the Agriculture, Fisheries & Conservation Department in 2012 and is an ecological surveyor in its Butterfly Working Group. The Field Officer is an expert on the winged insects and is well-versed in their behaviour. “The male butterflies usually put in a lot of effort to attract females. They try to find a plant with some special chemicals to convert them into pheromones to attract female butterflies.  “And some other butterflies, the male butterfly, will go to a hilltop. Such behaviour, we call that hill-topping. They go there to wait for a female butterfly to fly across so that they can have the courtship behaviour with them.” Survival skills The intricately detailed Tawny Mime is adept at imitating the appearance of the poisonous Chestnut Tiger to ward off predators, Mr Tam said. “They have a black forewing and a brown hindwing with some pale blue colour, colour stripes on their wings. “It is quite a beautiful butterfly but if you want to find one, it is quite difficult because the adults of Tawny Mime only appear in March and April every year. If you miss it, you will need to wait for another year to see this rare butterfly.” Mr Tam traverses the city to collect information on butterflies and finds it meaningful to help broaden people’s knowledge about the beautiful insects and to share the importance of environmental conservation. “Butterfly survey and investigation is very important to the public because butterflies are a part of our ecosystem. “When there are more butterflies, it means that there are more flowers and the vegetation should be quite good in the surrounding environment. They can support the butterflies, so that they come by. “It is very important for us to protect our environment so that more butterflies and animals can live there.” (For more details, please visit News.gov.hk Website)

T▪PARK – Transformation: Waste-to-Energy (Environmental Protection Department)

To support the concept of “waste-to-energy” and to promote a sustainable waste management strategy, T▪PARK, the first sludge incineration facility in Hong Kong was built in Tsang Tsui, Tuen Mun by the Environmental Protection Department (EPD). The facility is capable of processing up to 2,000 tonnes of sludge per day. In the past, sludge was disposed of at landfills, and this new approach has greatly alleviated the burden of depleting limited landfill capacity in Hong Kong. T▪PARK is also the largest and most advanced facility of its kind, combining sludge incineration, power generation, seawater desalination and wastewater treatment.AN INSPIRING AND MODERN DESIGNAt the beginning of the planning stage, EPD gathered the views of the public and later set up the District Liaison Group to strengthen communication with the key stakeholders. Many valuable suggestions, such as the expansion of the education centre and the addition of spa facilities, were incorporated into the design of T▪PARK. From the naming of the facility, the venue design, to the exhibits and the promotional activities, T▪PARK adopted an inspiring and modern design which combines environmental education with lifestyle trends to make it more attractive to the public.The design of the environmental education centre is highly innovative. The most eye-catching parts are the three indoor spa pools with different temperatures, which are maintained by the energy recovered from the sludge incineration process. The pools give the public a taste of the benefits of the “waste-to-energy” concept. The exhibition hall features a 180-degree projector to simulate the sludge treatment process in an interesting and interactive way via the use of sound, films and pictures, and lets the visitors experience what it would be like inside the incinerator. There is also an indoor walkway along the key processing areas where visitors can see the plant operation. T▪PARK features many environmental and conservational elements, including a bird sanctuary and a vegetarian eco-cafe which follows Food Wise, a food waste reduction campaign.WASTE-TO-RESOURCES, AND A FURTHER UNDERSTANDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTIONLocated next to a landfill outside the city centre of Hong Kong, T▪PARK is kept attractive to visitors by incorporating various creative elements in its exhibitions. One of the best examples is the furniture used in the cafe which is crafted from fender wood of the ex-Wanchai Ferry Pier area, showcasing the “waste-to-resources” concept.     Turning Ambition into Reality: Waste-to-energyWAN Gar-ling - Environmental Protection Officer, Environmental Protection Department. (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

"Letter to Hong Kong" Feature Video by Department Representatives

    (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

Drops · Livability (Drainage Services Department)

Happy Valley and its neighbourhood are low-lying areas flanked by hills. In the past, heavy rains triggered frequent flooding, which had a significant impact on the public. To protect people from the risk of floods, the Drainage Services Department (DSD) developed an innovative scheme to enhance flood protection in the district. The project team installed a stormwater storage tank underneath the Happy Valley Recreation Ground. During heavy rains, the tank temporarily stores excessive stormwater. Conventional drainage improvement schemes in urban areas are normally upgraded in-situ and in a large scale. In comparison, building a storage tank and storing flood water below ground greatly reduces disruptions to traffic flows and the general public. Movable weir The stormwater storage tank features a movable weir, which is a mechanism deployed by DSD for the first time. The weir’s opening, closing and overall positioning are automatically adjusted according to the real-time information on tidal levels as well as the water levels in the drainage culvert upstream and downstream. This mechanism allows stormwater overflow into the storage tank at the optimal time. Harvesting system collects groundwater and rainwater The tank’s design also incorporates a sizeable water harvesting system that collects groundwater and rainwater. After undergoing some simple treatment, the water can be used for irrigating the Happy Valley Recreation Ground and for toilet flushing, thereby conserving water resources. These features ensure that the project is sustainable and in line with the concept of “Sponge City”. Fan Room and Lawn A stormwater storage scheme requires the construction of support facilities above ground such as a fan room and a pump house. The project team customised the design to make optimal use of the site in the interest of the public. With an environment-friendly design, the ground floor of the fan room is opened up as a public amenity. The pump house is covered by a lawn, providing a comfortable outside area for fun and game watching. Going the extra mile, drop by drop, the project team consolidates stakeholders’ support and the fruit of joint efforts, bringing the project smoothly towards the goal of “Smart Drainage•Green Living”: flood protection and a more livable environment in tandem.     Partnering for innovationCHENG Nga-see - Senior Engineer, Drainage Services Department (For more details, please visit Sevice Excellence Website)

The 100 civil servants commended for their outstanding work performance in 2019 are...

The civil servants commended for their outstanding work performance this year came from 39 bureaux/departments and from various professional and technical grades, disciplined services and general grades as well as Model Scale 1 grades. Here let me introduce you five of the awardees.Senior Dental Officer of the Department of Health Dr So Hon-chingWith over 25 years of service with the Government, Dr So has been dedicating great efforts to promoting oral care services for the elderly. He participated in the formulation of the Outreach Dental Care Programme for the Elderly, which provides free outreach dental services for the elderly residing in residential care homes or receiving services in day care centres. The programme is benefiting about 50 000 elderly persons each year.Assistant Officer I of the Correctional Services Department (CSD) Mr Fida HussainMr Hussain said the CSD's rehabilitation work is very meaningful. In addition to day-to-day duties, Mr Hussain, who can speak several languages, assists the department by acting as an interpreter to explain custodial procedures to non-ethnic Chinese persons in custody and counselling them whenever necessary.Chief Customs Officer of the Customs and Excise Department Ms Lau Wai-manDuring her career in law enforcement and customs clearance spanning 30-odd years, Ms Lau has detected many drug trafficking and smuggling cases. She currently works at Lok Ma Chau Control Point and is responsible for monitoring and ensuring the smooth operation of cargo and vehicle clearance. Her rich front-line experience made her understand that while enforcing the law in a professional manner, Customs officers should treat the public with empathy and spend more time on communication and explanation so as to avoid unnecessary misunderstanding and conflicts.Senior Field Assistant of the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department Mr Shek Shui-waWith over 34 years of service with the Government, Mr Shek has been tasked with duties related to the conservation of native plants since joining the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department. Mr Shek has earlier collected from the field a seedling of the rare and precious Westland's birthwort for conservation outside its habitat. With his efforts and persistence, seeds eventually germinated and propagated successfully. He will return the grown plants to nature to assist in the propagation of this rare plant in Hong Kong.Senior Waterworks Inspector Mr Wong Yiu-waiMr Wong has served in different positions in the Water Supplies Department during his 36 years of service and is currently attached to the Water Loss Management Section. With identifying leaking underground water mains in Hong Kong and Islands Region as his main duty, he has to study a lot of data collected from the water mains network every day, and at times carries out leak detection on-site late at night before determining follow-up actions so as to safeguard precious water resources.(The SCS's Commendation Award Scheme was introduced in 2004 to commend colleagues who have achieved outstanding work performance continuously for at least five years. The Scheme has a meticulous selection process which requires nominations from Permanent Secretaries, departmental heads or heads of grades, adjudication by a selection committee and final decision on the awardees' list by the SCS.)

Government Job Opportunities for Non-Ethnic Chinese

Assistant Primary School Mistress, Miss Amypreet Kaur, "I know that applicants for civil service posts at degree or professional level are required to attain specific results in the Common Recruitment Examination (CRE). At first, I was worried that my Chinese reading and writing abilities would not be sufficient for me to obtain the necessary result in the Use of Chinese paper. After two attempts, I successfully obtained “Level 2” result. I am glad that my efforts in preparing for the exam paid off." "Why don’t you give it a try like me and apply for a government job?" Please watch the video for more information about the Government measures to facilitate the employment of non-ethnic Chinese in the civil service. Official recruitment page For the English audio version, please watch the video below.

Assistant Census and Survey Officer

“I think as an Assistant Census and Survey Officer, besides enjoying chatting with others and travelling around, we must have three Ps and tight lips." Vicky, Assistant Census and Survey Officer of Census and Statistics Department. “We must possess all these qualities and professional conduct so as to gain the trust of the public and reassure them to provide us with accurate information." Ricky, Assistant Census and Survey Officer of Census and Statistics Department. Please watch our video to find out more information about the work of Assistant Census and Survey Officer of Census and Statistics Department and its career prospect. Organisation chartOfficial recruitment page